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CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Wood, E. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 32A: Psychology of Architecture

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 32B: Design Theory

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture. Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media. nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice. nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 80N: Engineering the Built Environment: An Introduction to Structural Engineering

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 101A: Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Linder, C. (PI)

CEE 102: Legal Principles in Design, Construction, and Project Delivery

Introduction to the key legal principles affecting design, construction and the delivery of infrastructure projects. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of law, including principles of contract, negligence, professional responsibility, intellectual property, land use and environmental law, then draws on these concepts to examine current and developing means of project delivery.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ashcraft, H. (PI)

CEE 107R: E3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 207R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400-$600). Course will take place Sunday, March 25 - Friday, March 30. Lodging and food will be covered during the course. Must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses is required: CEE 107A, CEE 207A, Earthsys 103, CEE 107S, CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ginnebaugh, D. (PI)

CEE 112A: Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction

Building upon the concept of VDC Scorecard, CEE 112A/212A investigates in the management of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) programs and projects in the building industry. Interacting with experts and professionals in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and technology providers, students will learn from the industry applications of Building Information Modeling and its relationship with Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Design and Construction. Students will conduct case studies to evaluate the maturity of VDC planning, adoption, technology and performance in practice. Students taking 3 or 4 units will be paired up with independent research or case study projects on the industry applications of VDC. No prerequisite. See CEE112B/212B in the Winter Quarter and CEE 112C/212C in the Spring Quarter.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 120B: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 220B)

This course builds upon the Building Information Model concepts introduced in 120A/220A and illustrates how BIM modeling tools are used to design, analyze, and model building systems including structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection. Course covers the physical principles, design criteria, and design strategies for each system and explores processes and tools for modeling those systems and analyzing their performance.nTopics include: building envelopes, access systems, structural systems modeling and analysis, mechanical / HVAC systems, plumbing and fire protection systems, electrical systems, and systems integration/coordination.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 120S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 220S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 122A: Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction (A/E/C)

Undergraduates serve as apprentices to graduate students in the AEC global project teams in CEE 222A. Apprentices participate in all activities of the AEC team, including the goals, objectives, constraints, tasks, and process of a crossdisciplinary global AEC teamwork in the concept development phase of a comprehensive building project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fruchter, R. (PI)

CEE 124: Sustainable Development Studio

(Graduate students register for 224A.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 124Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 224Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 126Y: Hard Earth: Stanford Graduate-Student Talks Exploring Tough Environmental Dilemmas (EARTH 126Y)

Stanford's graduate students are a trove of knowledge -- and, just as important, curiosity -- about environmental sustainability. This seminar will feature talks by graduate students that explore the biggest, most bedeviling questions about environmental sustainability locally and around the world. The course will be structured as follows: every other week, we will hear hour-long graduate student talks about sustainability questions and their research, and on the off weeks, we will discuss the unanswered, debatable questions that relate to the previous week's talk.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 130: Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Debbas, C. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 133F: Principles of Freehand Drawing

Traditional methods of depicting shape, form, and surface are applied to the discipline of architectural drawing. Students develop abilities to observe visual phenomenon analytically and translate subjects onto a two-dimensional surface in a variety of media. Drawing techniques such as modeling form, shading, rendering materials, and articulating landscaping are explored. Linear perspective exercises provide a foundation for the construction of drawings to illustrate cohesive design proposals. Step-by-step constructions, quick freehand sketches from slides, and on-location studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Azgour, M. (PI); Lin, D. (GP)

CEE 134B: Intermediate Arch Studio (CEE 234B)

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 141B: Infrastructure Project Delivery (CEE 241B)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 146S: Engineering Economics and Sustainability (ENGR 60)

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 155: Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE (CEE 255)

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 156: Building Systems (CEE 256)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 159: Managing Construction Innovation - Practicum (CEE 259)

CEE 159/259 students join Stanford researchers in developing performance metrics and key performance indicators, which inform the assessment and management of productivity policies, industry initiatives, progressive enterprises, global projects or experimental processes in the construction industry. This project-based practicum builds upon a global network of government agencies, professional institutions and member companies collaborating with the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (CIFE). Through a series of Global Construction Innovation Case Studies, students will develop applied research skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice, while gaining insights into innovative and industrialized construction practice, such as the industry applications of Building Information Modeling (BIM), Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), Lean Methodology, Prefabricated Pre-finished Volumetric Construction (PPVC), Smart Cities or Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). nNote to students: this course may be taken repeat for credit for up to 9 cumulative units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 162F: Coastal Engineering

Introduction to the relevant processes that shape the coastline, including the hydrodynamical forcing and the resultant coastal morphology. Discussion of the natural response of coastal systems to forcing by the environment (e.g. waves, tides, storms) and how this forcing affects the sediment budget along the coast. Engineering solutions for mitigation of erosion and the associated advantages and disadvantages of such solutions. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fringer, O. (PI)

CEE 166B: Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts (CEE 266B)

Sociotechnical systems associated with human use of water as a resource and the hazards posed by too much or too little water. Potable and non-potable water use and conservation. Irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, rural and urban water supply systems, storm water management, flood damage mitigation, and water law and institutions. Emphasis is on engineering design. Prerequisite: 166A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 166D: Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips (CEE 266D)

Introduction to water use and water hazards via weekly field trips to local and regional water resources facilities (dams, reservoirs, fish ladders and hatcheries, pumping plants, aqueducts, hydropower plants, and irrigation systems) and flood damage mitigation facilities (storm water detention ponds, channel modifications, flood control dams, and reservoirs). Each trip preceded by an orientation lecture.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freyberg, D. (PI)

CEE 174B: Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI); King, J. (TA)

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Masters, G. (PI)

CEE 177X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 277X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 179A: Water Chemistry Laboratory (CEE 273A)

(Graduate students register for 273A.) Laboratory application of techniques for the analysis of natural and contaminated waters, emphasizing instrumental techniques
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 182: Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures

Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel; behavior of structural elements subject to bending moments, shear forces, torsion, axial loads, and combined actions; design of beams, slabs, columns and footings; strength design and serviceability requirements; design of simple structural systems for buildings. Prerequisite: 180.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199A: Special Projects in Architecture

Faculty-directed study or internship. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 199B: Directed Studies in Architecture

Projects may include studio-mentoring activities, directed reading and writing on topics in the history and theory of architectural design, or investigations into design methodologies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199H: Undergraduate Honors Thesis

For students who have declared the Civil Engineering B.S. honors major and have obtained approval of a topic for research under the guidance of a CEE faculty adviser. Letter grade only. Written thesis or oral presentation required.n (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 199L: Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 200B: Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 202: Construction Law and Claims

Concepts include the preparation and analysis of construction claims, cost overrun and schedule delay analysis, general legal principles, contracts, integrated project delivery, public private partnerships and the resolution of construction disputes through ADR and litigation. Requires attendance of the ten weeks of Monday classes and the first five weeks of Wednesday classes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 207R: E3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 107R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break 2018 at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! The course will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400-$600). Course will take place Sunday, March 25 - Friday, March 30. Lodging and food will be covered during the course. Must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses is required: CEE 107A, CEE 207A, Earthsys 103, CEE 107S, CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ginnebaugh, D. (PI)

CEE 220B: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 120B)

This course builds upon the Building Information Model concepts introduced in 120A/220A and illustrates how BIM modeling tools are used to design, analyze, and model building systems including structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection. Course covers the physical principles, design criteria, and design strategies for each system and explores processes and tools for modeling those systems and analyzing their performance.nTopics include: building envelopes, access systems, structural systems modeling and analysis, mechanical / HVAC systems, plumbing and fire protection systems, electrical systems, and systems integration/coordination.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 220S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 120S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 222A: Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) Global Teamwork

AEC students engage in a crossdisciplinary, collaborative, geographically distributed, and multicultural project-based teamwork. AEC teams exercise their domain knowledge and information technologies in a multidisciplinary context focusing on the design and construction concept development phase of a comprehensive building project. Prerequisite: interview with Instructor in Autumn Quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fruchter, R. (PI)

CEE 224A: Sustainable Development Studio

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 224S: Sustainable Urban Systems Seminar

The Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Seminar Series will feature speakers from academia, practice, industry, and government who are on the forefront of research and innovation in sustainable urban systems. The SUS Seminar will be open to the public; students will have the option of obtaining 1 unit of course credit based on attendance and completion of writing assignments.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 224Y: Sustainable Urban Systems Project (CEE 124Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y)

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for an upcoming new SUS M.S. Program within CEE. Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. To view project descriptions and apply, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses/.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 227: Global Project Finance

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 230: Urban Development and Governance

Introduction to urban planning, policy, politics, and governance by a lecture team from SPUR. Focus on the U.S., California, and the Bay Area.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 234B: Intermediate Arch Studio (CEE 134B)

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 235: CapaCity Design Studio

Silicon Valley's rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges. Students will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservation) combined with advanced sustainable design concepts (such as resource co-optimization, and adaptable infrastructure platforms, and high performance urban ecology) by working with expert lecturers and in small groups. Students will ultimately develop a series of visual and technical presentations to propose a final thesis for a local intervention that could be replicated in other coastal contexts globally. This course has been designed to develop student learning through a project-based format. Students will be organized into design teams of 3 or 4 and will have the semester to collaborate with partners on an interdisciplinary proposal including policy and design recommendations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Varga, L. (PI)

CEE 241: Managing Fabrication and Construction

Methods to manage the physical production of construction projects; design, analysis, and optimization of the fabricate-assemble process including performance metrics. Project management techniques and production system design including: push versus pull methods; master scheduling and look-ahead scheduling; scope, cost, and schedule control; earned value analysis; critical path method; location-based scheduling; 4D modeling; workflow; trade coordination; methods to understand uncertainty and reduce process variability; and supply chain systems including made-to-stock, engineered-to-order, and made-to-order. Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Recommended corequisite: 240.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 241B: Infrastructure Project Delivery (CEE 141B)

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Sedar, B. (PI)

CEE 242: Organization Design for Projects and Companies

Introduction to organizational behavior and organizational design for construction projects and companies. Class incorporates readings, individual, small group and large group case study assignments. Students use computer simulation to design real-world project organizations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 249: Labor and Industrial Relations: Negotiations, Strikes, and Dispute Resolution

Labor/management negotiations, content of a labor agreement, strikes, dispute resolution, contemporary issues affecting labor and management, and union versus open shop competitiveness in the marketplace. Case studies; presentations by union leaders, legal experts, and contractor principals. Simulated negotiation session with union officials and role play in an arbitration hearing.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Walton, M. (PI)

CEE 255: Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE (CEE 155)

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 256: Building Systems (CEE 156)

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kolderup, E. (PI)

CEE 259: Managing Construction Innovation - Practicum (CEE 159)

CEE 159/259 students join Stanford researchers in developing performance metrics and key performance indicators, which inform the assessment and management of productivity policies, industry initiatives, progressive enterprises, global projects or experimental processes in the construction industry. This project-based practicum builds upon a global network of government agencies, professional institutions and member companies collaborating with the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering (CIFE). Through a series of Global Construction Innovation Case Studies, students will develop applied research skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice, while gaining insights into innovative and industrialized construction practice, such as the industry applications of Building Information Modeling (BIM), Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), Lean Methodology, Prefabricated Pre-finished Volumetric Construction (PPVC), Smart Cities or Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). nNote to students: this course may be taken repeat for credit for up to 9 cumulative units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Kam, C. (PI)

CEE 259B: Construction Problems

Group-selected problems in construction techniques, equipment, or management; preparation of oral and written reports. Guest specialists from the construction industry. See 299 for individual studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in CEM program and consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 260C: Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport (ESS 221)

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 261B: Physics of Wind Energy (ENERGY 262, ME 262)

Formerly CEE 261. An introduction to the analysis and modeling of wind energy resources and their extraction. Topics include the physical origins of atmospheric winds; vertical profiles of wind speed and turbulence over land and sea; the wind energy spectrum and its modification by natural topography and built environments; theoretical limits on wind energy extraction by wind turbines and wind farms; modeling of wind turbine aerodynamics and wind farm performance. Final project will focus on development of a new wind energy technology concept. Prerequisites: CEE 262A or ME 351A
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 262B: Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows

Application of fluid mechanics to problems of pollutant transport and mixing in the water environment. Mathematical models of advection, diffusion, and dispersion. Application of theory to problems of transport and mixing in rivers, estuaries, and lakes and reservoirs. Recommended: 262A and CME 102 (formerly ENGR 155A), or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 263D: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 64)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 263S: Atmosphere/Energy Seminar

Interdisciplinary seminar with talks by researchers and practitioners in the fields of atmospheric science and renewable energy engineering. Addresses the causes of climate, air pollution, and weather problems and methods of addressing these problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 265A: Sustainable Water Resources Development

Alternative criteria for judging the sustainability of projects. Application of criteria to evaluate sustainability of water resources projects in several countries. Case studies illustrate the role of political, social, economic, and environmental factors in decision making. Influence of international aid agencies and NGOs on water projects. Evaluation of benefit-cost analysis and environmental impact assessment as techniques for enhancing the sustainability of future projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental and Water Studies, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ortolano, L. (PI)

CEE 266B: Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts (CEE 166B)

Sociotechnical systems associated with human use of water as a resource and the hazards posed by too much or too little water. Potable and non-potable water use and conservation. Irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, rural and urban water supply systems, storm water management, flood damage mitigation, and water law and institutions. Emphasis is on engineering design. Prerequisite: 166A or equivalent. (Freyberg)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 266D: Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips (CEE 166D)

Introduction to water use and water hazards via weekly field trips to local and regional water resources facilities (dams, reservoirs, fish ladders and hatcheries, pumping plants, aqueducts, hydropower plants, and irrigation systems) and flood damage mitigation facilities (storm water detention ponds, channel modifications, flood control dams, and reservoirs). Each trip preceded by an orientation lecture.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Freyberg, D. (PI)

CEE 268: Groundwater Flow

Flow and mass transport in porous media. Applications of potential flow theory and numerical modeling methods to practical groundwater problems: flow to and from wells, rivers, lakes, drainage ditches; flow through and under dams; streamline tracing; capture zones of wells; and mixing schemes for in-situ remediation. Prerequisites: calculus and introductory fluid mechanics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 269B: Environmental Engineering Seminar

Presentations on current research, practice and thinking in environmental engineering by visiting academics and practitioners.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ong, C. (PI)

CEE 271A: Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes

Physical and chemical unit operations for water treatment, emphasizing process combinations for drinking water supply. Application of the principles of chemistry, rate processes, fluid dynamics, and process engineering to define and solve water treatment problems by flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, disinfection, oxidation, aeration, and adsorption. Investigative paper on water supply and treatment. Prerequisites: CEE 101B (or CEE 162A); CEE 270. Recommended: 273.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Luthy, R. (PI)

CEE 271B: Environmental Biotechnology

Stoichiometry, kinetics, and thermodynamics of microbial processes for the transformation of environmental contaminants. Design of dispersed growth and biofilm-based processes. Applications include treatment of municipal and industrial waste waters, detoxification of hazardous chemicals, and groundwater remediation. Prerequisites: 270; 177 or 274A or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 272: Coastal Contaminants

Coastal pollution and its effects on ecosystems and human health. The sources, fate, and transport of human pathogens and nutrients. Background on coastal ecosystems and coastal transport phenomena including tides, waves, and cross shelf transport. Introduction to time series analysis with MATLAB. Undergraduates require consent of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 272T: SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar (EE 292T)

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Rajagopal, R. (PI)

CEE 273A: Water Chemistry Laboratory (CEE 179A)

(Graduate students register for 273A.) Laboratory application of techniques for the analysis of natural and contaminated waters, emphasizing instrumental techniques
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 273B: The Business of Water

One of the fastest growing economic sectors is the water field, and private water companies are playing an increasingly important role in improving water management around the world. In some cases, however, the involvement of private companies in the water sector has also proven controversial (e.g., when private companies have taken over public water supply systems in developing countries such as Bolivia). This course will look at established or emerging businesses in the water sector and the legal, economic, and social issues that they generate. These businesses include investor-owned water utilities, water technology companies (e.g., companies investing in new desalination or water recycling technologies), water-right funds (who directly buy and sell water rights), social impact funds, innovative agricultural operations, water concessionaires, and infrastructure construction companies and investors. Each week will focus on a different business and company. Company executives will attend the class session and discuss their business with the class. In most classes, we will examine (1) the viability and efficacy of the company's business plan, (2) the legal and/or social issues arising from the business' work, and (3) how the business might contribute to improved water management and policy. Each student will be expected to write (1) two short reflection papers during the course of the quarter on businesses that present to the class, and (2) a 15-page paper at the conclusion on the class on either a water company of the student's choice or a policy initiative that can improve the role that business plays in improving water management (either in a particular sector or more generally). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 274B: Microbial Bioenergy Systems (CHEMENG 456)

Introduction to microbial metabolic pathways and to the pathway logic with a special focus on microbial bioenergy systems. The first part of the course emphasizes the metabolic and biochemical principles of pathways, whereas the second part is more specifically directed toward using this knowledge to understand existing systems and to design innovative microbial bioenergy systems for biofuel, biorefinery, and environmental applications. There also is an emphasis on the implications of rerouting of energy and reducing equivalents for the fitness and ecology of the organism. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 174 or 181 and organic chemistry, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Spormann, A. (PI)

CEE 275K: The Practice of Environmental Consulting

Class consists of eight interactive two-hour seminars with discussions, and will cover the evolution of the environmental consulting business, strategic choices and alternative business models for private and public firms, a review of the key operational issues in managing firm, organizational strategies, knowledge management and innovation, and ethical issues in providing professional services. Case studies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Selected reading materials drawn from the technical and business literature on the consulting business. Student groups will prepare and present an abbreviated business plan for an environmental based business. Enrollment limited to CEE MS and PHD students.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 277F: Advanced Field Methods in Water, Health and Development

Field methods for assessing household stored water quality, hand contamination, behaviors, and knowledge related to water, sanitation and health. Limited enrollment. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-10 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 277X: Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering (CEE 177X)

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center). Instructor consent required.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 278A: Air Pollution Fundamentals

The sources and health effects of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The influence of meteorology on pollution: temperature profiles, stability classes, inversion layers, turbulence. Atmospheric diffusion equations, downwind dispersion of emissions from point and line sources. Removal of air pollutants via settling, diffusion, coagulation, precipitation, Mechanisms for ozone formation, in the troposphere versus in the stratosphere. Effects of airborne particle size and composition on light scattering/absorption, and on visual range. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or equivalent. Recommended: 101B, CHEM 31A, or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Hildemann, L. (PI)

CEE 281: Mechanics and Finite Elements

Fluid conduction and solid deformation; conservation laws: balance of mass and balance of momentum; generalized Darcy's law and Hooke's law in 3D; the use of tensors in mechanics; finite element formulation of boundary-value problems; variational equations and Galerkin approximations; basic shape functions, numerical integration, and assembly operations.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 282: Nonlinear Structural Analysis

Introduction to methods of geometric and material nonlinear analysis, emphasizing modeling approaches for framed structures. Large-displacement analysis, concentrated and distributed plasticity models, and nonlinear solution methods. Applications to frame stability and performance-based seismic design. Assignments emphasize computer implementation and applications. Prerequisites: 280 and an advanced course in structural behavior (e.g., 285A, 285B or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 283: Structural Dynamics

Vibrations and dynamic response of simple structures under time dependent loads; dynamic analysis of single and multiple degrees of freedom systems; support motion; response spectra.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Law, K. (PI)

CEE 285B: Advanced Structural Steel Behavior and Design

Advanced topics in structural steel design. Topics include composite floor systems; bolted and welded connections; beam-column connections; innovative lateral load resisting systems. As part of this course students design a 15-story steel building. Prerequisite: basic course in structural steel design CEE181 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Miranda, E. (PI)

CEE 288: Introduction to Performance Based Earthquake Engineering

Earthquake phenomena, faulting, ground motion, earthquake hazard formulation, effects of earthquakes on manmade structures, response spectra, Fourier spectra, soil effects on ground motion and structural damage, methods for structural damage evaluation, and formulation of the performance-based earthquake engineering problems. Prerequisites: 203, 283.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Kiremidjian, A. (PI)

CEE 293: Foundations and Earth Structures

Types, characteristics, analysis, and design of shallow and deep foundations; rigid and flexible retaining walls; braced excavations; settlement of footings in sands and clays; slope stability analysis by method of slices including search algorithms for the critical slip surface. Prerequisite: 101C or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Wren, J. (PI)

CEE 298: Structural Engineering and Geomechanics Seminar

Recommended for all graduate students. Lectures on topics of current interest in professional practice and research.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Baker, J. (PI)

CEE 299L: Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 301: The Energy Seminar (ENERGY 301, MS&E 494)

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Weyant, J. (PI)

CEE 308: Topics in Disaster Resilience Research (GEOPHYS 308)

This seminar will explore past and current research on disaster risk and resilience, towards the development of new frontiers in resilience engineering science research. Designed for graduate students engaged in the topic of risk and resilience research, the seminar will be organized around weekly readings and discussion groups. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Baker, J. (PI); Soden, R. (PI)

CEE 323B: Infrastructure Finance and Governance

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Levitt, R. (PI)

CEE 324: Industrialized Construction

The course will present driving forces, comprehensive concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction. Further a series of case studies of successful and failed industry implementations in Sweden, North America and Japan will be presented, showcasing process and technology platforms; use of renewable resources and other sustainable design and construction practices. The contrast between industrialized construction practices in Sweden, the U.S. and other countries is highlighted. Project-orientated vs. product-oriented approaches are essential, along with business models and strategies for industrialized construction companies and their opportunities for innovations. The course includes lectures, case studies, and course group-project assignments with leading companies in the industry.nnVisiting lecturer Dr Jerker Lessing, one of Sweden's leading experts on industrialized construction with more than 15 years of experience in this field, is giving this course. This is a unique opportunity to learn about this comprehensive, emerging construction concept. Dr Lessing's research at Lund University has pioneered the area of industrialized construction and established models and strategic perspectives that are widely adopted throughout academia and industry. Dr Lessing has published articles and books and he frequently lectures on the topic in Sweden and internationally. He is the Director and General manager of Research and Development at BoKlok, an industrialized house-building company which is a joint venture of the construction company SKANSKA and furniture giant IKEA. The class will be taught as a condensed two week course. Readings and discussions will be organized in the weeks before the lecture component of the class, a group project after. During weeks 1-5, class will not meet regularly and only meet a few times for reading discussions and guest speakers. When they occur, these meetings will be held either Tuesday or Thursday 8-9am in Y2E2 292A. A detailed class schedule will be available before the start of the quarter.nnNotes:nAttendance Mandatory. No Exam. Case and Problem Discussion. CR/NC and Auditing Not Allowed.nEligible for SDC Building & Infrastructure Development concentration area requirement.nnNumber of students limited to 20; prerequisites: CEE100 or equivalent. Please direct questions to jerker.lessing@boklok.se or adusser@stanford.edu and co
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 325: CapaCity Design Studio

Silicon Valley¿s rapid expansion has created explosive urban development in a fragile and under-prepared natural context. Delicate coastal ecology and rapid urbanization (expanding technology headquarters, new residential housing, parking, services, etc.) are competing for space. The same land also serves the regional functions of transport, open space, recreation, water supply, flood protection and wastewater treatment. Compounding the problems between these competing factors are global climate change instabilities increasing the certainty of catastrophic flooding, infrastructure collapse, and other urban resilience challenges.nnStudents will be immersed in a process that allows them to understand and spatially identify these risks, develop a vocabulary and an understanding of innovative tools to respond to them, and then work with expert practitioners to create unique design responses. Students will be provided with urban design frameworks (for planning, site development, and conservation) combined with advanced sustainable design concepts (such as resource co-optimization, adaptable infrastructure platforms, and high performance urban ecology) by working with expert lecturers and in small groups. Students will ultimately develop a series of visual and technical presentations to propose a final thesis for a local intervention that could be replicated in other coastal contexts globally.nnThis course has been designed to develop student learning through a project-based format. Students will be organized into design teams of 3 or 4 and will have the semester to collaborate with partners on an interdisciplinary proposal including policy and design recommendations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 326: Autonomous Vehicle Frameworks Developing and Applying Comparison Metrics

Autonomous vehicles have been a fast-growing area of interest for research, development, and commercialization. This interdisciplinary research-based class explores methods for evaluating and comparing autonomous vehicles. Research teams find, define and assess metrics, including reaction time, time efficiency, error rate, safety, and information sharing. Collaborate with national and international experts. Consideration of economic, social and environmental implications. Independent and team projects will contribute to ongoing research.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Fischer, M. (PI); Fu, E. (PI)

CEE 362A: Uncertainty Quantification (ME 470)

Uncertainty analysis in computational science. Probabilistic data representation, propagation techniques and validation under uncertainty. Mathematical and statistical foundations of random variables and processes for uncertainty modeling. Focus is on state-of-the-art propagation schemes, sampling techniques, and stochastic Galerkin methods. The concept of model validation under uncertainty and the determination of confidence bounds estimates. Prerequisite: basic probability and statistics at the level of CME 106 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Gorle, C. (PI)

CEE 363B: Chaos and Turbulence

An overview of the statistical analysis of unsteady flows, with a focus on chaos and turbulence. Topics will include random variables and statistical analysis; self-similarity, scaling, and symmetries; the turbulent energy cascade and the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses; intermittency, refined similarity, and multifractal analysis; mixing and transport in chaotic and turbulent flows; and an overview of the effects of additional conservation laws on flow statistics. Prerequisites: CEE 262A or ME 351A, or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: ; Ouellette, N. (PI)

CEE 365B: Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 370B: Environmental Research

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.
Terms: Win | Units: 5-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 371L: Helminthic Disease Monitoring and Control.

Assessment will be based upon weekly written and/or oral reports, with a final written critical review due at the end of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Criddle, C. (PI)

CEE 374B: Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-6 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Criddle, C. (PI)

CEE 374M: Advanced Topics in Watershed Systems Modeling

Basic principles of watershed systems analysis is required for water resources evaluation, watershed-scale water quality issues, and watershed-scale pollutant transport problems. The dynamics of watershed-scale processes and the human impact on natural systems, and for developing remediation strategies are studied, including terrain analysis and surface and subsurface characterization procedures and analysis.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: ; Luthy, R. (PI)

CEE 374S: Advanced Topics in Microbial Pollution

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 374T: Advanced Topics in Coastal Pollution

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 374U: Advanced Topics in Submarine Groundwater Discharge

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 374V: Advanced Topics in Microbial Source Tracking

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Boehm, A. (PI)

CEE 374W: Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 374X: Advanced Topics in Multivariate Statistical Analysis

Analysis of experimental and non-experimental data using multivariate modeling approaches. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required for enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-6 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: ; Davis, J. (PI)

CEE 377: Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 398: Report on Civil Engineering Training

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors; meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser as per I-Center procedures.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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