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1 - 3 of 3 results for: comm153

COMM 153: Political Campaigning in the Internet Age (COMM 253)

This course will acquaint students with the changing environment for campaigns posed by the rise of the Internet. So much of the traditional way analysts have understood campaigns has revolved around television as the primary mode of campaign communication. The rise of the Internet, nonlinear television programming, and mobile communication enables new forms of campaigning. This course will examine the relevant social science on these topics, while at the same time bringing in guest lecturers from industry, campaigns, and media. Requirements: Students will be required to complete a 25 page research paper on a topic relevant to the course.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMM 153A: What The 2018 Elections Told Us And How They Help Us See How Campaigns Can Win In 2020 (COMM 253A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 146, PUBLPOL 246)

(Same as LAW 7057). The frequency of American elections means that we¿re never that far away from the next contest. This course is situated shortly after the conclusion of the 2018 midterm elections at the very start of the invisible primary that precedes the 2020 presidential campaign. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Our goal is to discern the lessons learned from the 2018 midterm elections, and how they will inform our understanding of what will happen in the 2020 presidential contest
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

COMM 153B: Free Speech, Democracy and the Internet (COMM 253B)

Crosslisted with LAW 7082. This course will cover contemporary challenges to democracy presented by the Internet. Topics will include disinformation, polarization, hate speech, media transformation, election integrity, and legal regulation of internet platforms in the U.S. and abroad. Guest speakers from academia and industry will present on these topics in each class session, followed by a discussion. Students will be responsible for one-page papers each week on the readings and a research paper to be turned in at the fall paper deadline. Students can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the research paper length. This class is limited to 30 students, with an effort made to have students from SLS (20 students will be selected by lottery) and 10 non-law students by consent of instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)
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