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1 - 10 of 16 results for: PUBLPOL 1: Introduction to Public Policy

EDUC 202I: International Education Policy Workshop (EDUC 102I)

This is a project-based workshop. Practical introduction to issues in educational policy making, education reform, educational planning, implementation of policy interventions, and monitoring and evaluation in developing country contexts. Preference to students enrolled in ICE/IEAPA, but open to other students interested in international development or comparative public policy with instructor's consent. Attendance at first class required for enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Thomas, C. (PI)

ETHICSOC 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (INTNLREL 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

HUMBIO 129S: Global Public Health

The class is an introduction to the fields of international public health and global medicine. It focuses on resource poor areas of the world and explores major global health problems and their relation to policy, economic development, culture and human rights. We discuss technical solutions as well as the importance of the social determinants of health, and emphasize multi-sectoral approaches to care. The course is intended to challenge all students to think globally, and is geared for students interested in exploring how their major interests cold be directed to solve global health issues. We provide opportunities for in-depth discussion and interaction with experts in the field. This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

LAW 7502: Economic Analysis of Law

This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differ from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict more »
This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differ from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict liability; property rules; remedies for breach of contract; and the American rule versus the English rule for allocating litigation costs. There is no formal economics prerequisite to take this course, though some prior training in economics will be helpful. Elements used in grading: Final exam (open-book) plus three short take-home problems during the quarter. Cross-listed with Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 302B). (For students interested in a shorter introduction to economic analysis of law, see Law 7503, "Introduction to Law and Economics," which is a one-unit course also offered during the winter quarter that is graded on a mandatory pass-fail basis.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Polinsky, A. (PI)

POLISCI 150B: Machine Learning for Social Scientists (POLISCI 355B)

Machine learning - the use of algorithms to classify, predict, sort, learn and discover from data - has exploded in use across academic fields, industry, government, and the non-profit sector. This course provides an introduction to machine learning for social scientists. We will introduce state of the art machine learning tools, show how to use those tools in the programming language R, and demonstrate why a social science focus is essential to effectively apply machine learning techniques in social, political, and policy contexts. Applications of the methods will include forecasting social phenomena, evaluating the use of algorithms in public policy, and the analysis of social media and text data. Prerequisite: POLISCI 150A/355A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

POLISCI 150C: Causal Inference for Social Science (POLISCI 355C)

Causal inference methods have revolutionized the way we use data, statistics, and research design to move from correlation to causation and rigorously learn about the impact of some potential cause (e.g., a new policy or intervention) on some outcome (e.g., election results, levels of violence, poverty). This course provides an introduction that teaches students the toolkit of modern causal inference methods as they are now widely used across academic fields, government, industry, and non-profits. Topics include experiments, matching, regression, sensitivity analysis, difference-in-differences, panel methods, instrumental variable estimation, and regression discontinuity designs. We will illustrate and apply the methods with examples drawn from various fields including policy evaluation, political science, public health, economics, business, and sociology. Prerequisite: POLISCI 150A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR

PUBLPOL 1: Introduction to Public Policy

Public Policy 1 is an introduction to the wide range of fields and methods used in Public Policy analysis including economics, political science, social psychology, justice, ethics and organizations. The course will have weekly speakers who will provide examples of policy analysis from a variety of perspectives. Attendance mandatory.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 55N: Public Policy and Personal Finance (ECON 25N)

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Rosston, G. (PI)

PUBLPOL 100: Hoover Institution National Security Affairs Fellows Mentorship Program

This course is designed to give Stanford undergraduates an introduction to civil-military relations, leadership development, and operational aspects of American foreign policy. Admitted undergraduates will be mentored by a distinguished leader from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, or State Department for the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters of the 2020-21 academic year. Participation in all three quarters is required. These military leaders and diplomats are part of the Hoover Institution¿s National Security Affairs Fellows program. The course will be held on Zoom and the scheduled class time will be used for group activities, lectures from the National Security Affairs Fellows on their experiences in the military and the State Department, small group meetings with mentees and mentors, and special sessions with senior American foreign policy leaders. At the end of each quarter, students write short reflection papers. No expertise in international affairs is necessary to apply and all majors are welcome. Selection is based on academic excellence, extracurricular leadership, and interest in international affairs. The program is directed by Dr. Amy Zegart. To apply, send a cover letter and resume to Taylor McLamb (twj@stanford.edu) by September 1, 2020.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
Instructors: Zegart, A. (PI)

PUBLPOL 101: Introduction to American Politics and Policy: In Defense of Democracy (AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 201)

This is a course about American politics. Traditionally, it has been taught as an introduction to various concepts and theoretical frameworks that help us understand the foundations of our political system. We take a different approach. In recent years, American democracy has faced a series of unprecedented challenges. Our objective is to work together to identify the greatest areas of weakness in the American political system, make sense of the most pressing threats facing democracy, and contemplate how democracy might be saved.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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