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1 - 2 of 2 results for: MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory

MATSCI 161: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 171)

From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). The course will finish with students giving presentations on the prospects of using dynamic windows and generic radiation control in cars, homes, commercial buildings or airplanes. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

MATSCI 171: Energy Materials Laboratory (MATSCI 161)

From early church architecture through modern housing, windows are passages of energy and matter in the forms of light, sound and air. By letting in heat during the summer and releasing it in winter, windows can place huge demands on air conditioning and heating systems, thereby increasing energy consumption and raising greenhouse gas levels in the atmosphere. Latest advances in materials science have enabled precise and on-demand control of electromagnetic radiation through `smart¿ dynamic windows with photochromic and electrochromic materials that change color and optical density in response to light radiance and electrical potential. In this course, we will spend the whole quarter on a project to make and characterize dynamic windows based on one of the electrochromic material systems, the reversible electroplating of metal alloys. There will be an emphasis in this course on characterization methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, four-point probe measurements of conductivity and electrochemical measurements (cyclic voltammetry). The course will finish with students giving presentations on the prospects of using dynamic windows and generic radiation control in cars, homes, commercial buildings or airplanes. Undergraduates register for 161 for 4 units; graduates register for 171 for 3 units.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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