2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 1 of 1 results for: EE 376D: Wireless Information Theory

EE 376D: Wireless Information Theory

Information theory forms the basis for the design of all modern day communication systems. The original theory was primarily point-to-point, studying how fast information can flow across an isolated noisy communication channel. Until recently, there has been only limited success in extending the theory to a network of interacting nodes. Progress has been made in the past decade driven by engineering interest in wireless networks. The course provides a unified overview of this recent progress made in information theory of wireless networks. Starting with an overview of the capacity of fading and multiple-antenna wireless channels, we aim to answer questions such as: What is the optimal way for users to cooperate and exchange information in a wireless network? How much benefit can optimal cooperation provide over traditional communication architectures? How can cooperation help to deal with interference between multiple wireless transmissions? Formerly EE361. Prerequisites: EE376A
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints