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1 - 10 of 15 results for: Math51

BIO 165: Quantitative Approaches in Modern Biology (BIO 265)

Modern research approaches tightly integrate experimentation with data analysis and mathematical modeling to provide unprecedented insights into the organization and functioning of living systems. This course explores the quantitative basis of major cellular processes and their coordination to form a cohesive physiological entity that is capable of rapid growth and acclimation to changing environments. Weekly lectures will be accompanied by 'dry lab sessions' in which students analyze experimental data sets and discuss the challenges of accomplishing rigorous and reproducible research. As such, students will actively develop a fundamental skill set of quantitative biology which includes knowledge in coding, dynamical systems modeling, and statistics. Assumes basic (but not advanced) familiarity with math, e.g. MATH51. Enrollment by permission of the professor, apply at https://forms.gle/j6ocJs8fQFPK1GGLA.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

BIO 265: Quantitative Approaches in Modern Biology (BIO 165)

Modern research approaches tightly integrate experimentation with data analysis and mathematical modeling to provide unprecedented insights into the organization and functioning of living systems. This course explores the quantitative basis of major cellular processes and their coordination to form a cohesive physiological entity that is capable of rapid growth and acclimation to changing environments. Weekly lectures will be accompanied by 'dry lab sessions' in which students analyze experimental data sets and discuss the challenges of accomplishing rigorous and reproducible research. As such, students will actively develop a fundamental skill set of quantitative biology which includes knowledge in coding, dynamical systems modeling, and statistics. Assumes basic (but not advanced) familiarity with math, e.g. MATH51. Enrollment by permission of the professor, apply at https://forms.gle/j6ocJs8fQFPK1GGLA.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 154: Data Analytics for Physical Systems (CEE 254)

This course introduces practical applications of data analytics and machine learning from understanding sensor data to extracting information and decision making in the context of sensed physical systems. Many civil engineering applications involve complex physical systems, such as buildings, transportation, and infrastructure systems, which are integral to urban systems and human activities. Emerging data science techniques and rapidly growing data about these systems have enabled us to better understand them and make informed decisions. In this course, students will work with real-world data to learn about challenges in analyzing data, applications of statistical analysis and machine learning techniques using MATLAB, and limitations of the outcomes in domain-specific contexts. Topics include data visualization, noise cleansing, frequency domain analysis, forward and inverse modeling, feature extraction, machine learning, and error analysis. Prerequisites: CS106A, CME 100/ Math51, Stats110/101, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CEE 254: Data Analytics for Physical Systems (CEE 154)

This course introduces practical applications of data analytics and machine learning from understanding sensor data to extracting information and decision making in the context of sensed physical systems. Many civil engineering applications involve complex physical systems, such as buildings, transportation, and infrastructure systems, which are integral to urban systems and human activities. Emerging data science techniques and rapidly growing data about these systems have enabled us to better understand them and make informed decisions. In this course, students will work with real-world data to learn about challenges in analyzing data, applications of statistical analysis and machine learning techniques using MATLAB, and limitations of the outcomes in domain-specific contexts. Topics include data visualization, noise cleansing, frequency domain analysis, forward and inverse modeling, feature extraction, machine learning, and error analysis. Prerequisites: CS106A, CME 100/ Math51, Stats110/101, or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CME 200: Linear Algebra with Application to Engineering Computations (ME 300A)

Computer based solution of systems of algebraic equations obtained from engineering problems and eigen-system analysis, Gaussian elimination, effect of round-off error, operation counts, banded matrices arising from discretization of differential equations, ill-conditioned matrices, matrix theory, least square solution of unsolvable systems, solution of non-linear algebraic equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, similar matrices, unitary and Hermitian matrices, positive definiteness, Cayley-Hamilton theory and function of a matrix and iterative methods. Prerequisite: familiarity with computer programming, and MATH51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CME 251: Geometric and Topological Data Analysis (CS 233)

Mathematical and computational tools for the analysis of data with geometric content, such images, videos, 3D scans, GPS traces -- as well as for other data embedded into geometric spaces. Linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction techniques. Graph representations of data and spectral methods. The rudiments of computational topology and persistent homology on sampled spaces, with applications. Global and local geometry descriptors allowing for various kinds of invariances. Alignment, matching, and map/correspondence computation between geometric data sets. Annotation tools for geometric data. Geometric deep learning on graphs and sets. Function spaces and functional maps. Networks of data sets and joint learning for segmentation and labeling. Prerequisites: discrete algorithms at the level of CS161; linear algebra at the level of Math51 or CME103.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3

CS 229: Machine Learning (STATS 229)

Topics: statistical pattern recognition, linear and non-linear regression, non-parametric methods, exponential family, GLMs, support vector machines, kernel methods, deep learning, model/feature selection, learning theory, ML advice, clustering, density estimation, EM, dimensionality reduction, ICA, PCA, reinforcement learning and adaptive control, Markov decision processes, approximate dynamic programming, and policy search. Prerequisites: knowledge of basic computer science principles and skills at a level sufficient to write a reasonably non-trivial computer program in Python/NumPy to the equivalency of CS106A, CS106B, or CS106X, familiarity with probability theory to the equivalency of CS 109, MATH151, or STATS 116, and familiarity with multivariable calculus and linear algebra to the equivalency of MATH51 or CS205.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 3-4

CS 233: Geometric and Topological Data Analysis (CME 251)

Mathematical and computational tools for the analysis of data with geometric content, such images, videos, 3D scans, GPS traces -- as well as for other data embedded into geometric spaces. Linear and non-linear dimensionality reduction techniques. Graph representations of data and spectral methods. The rudiments of computational topology and persistent homology on sampled spaces, with applications. Global and local geometry descriptors allowing for various kinds of invariances. Alignment, matching, and map/correspondence computation between geometric data sets. Annotation tools for geometric data. Geometric deep learning on graphs and sets. Function spaces and functional maps. Networks of data sets and joint learning for segmentation and labeling. Prerequisites: discrete algorithms at the level of CS161; linear algebra at the level of Math51 or CME103.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CS 248B: Fundamentals of Computer Graphics: Animation and Simulation

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to computer graphics, focusing on fundamental concepts and techniques in Computer Animation and Physics Simulation. Topics include numerical integration, 3D character modeling, keyframe animation, skinning/rigging, inverse kinematics, rigid body dynamics, deformable body simulation, and fluid simulation. Prerequisites: CS107 and MATH51.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

MATH 51: Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus, and Modern Applications

This course provides unified coverage of linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus, and the free course e-text connects the material to many fields. Linear algebra in large dimensions underlies the scientific, data-driven, and computational tasks of the 21st century. The linear algebra portion includes orthogonality, linear independence, matrix algebra, and eigenvalues with applications such as least squares, linear regression, and Markov chains (relevant to population dynamics, molecular chemistry, and PageRank); the singular value decomposition (essential in image compression, topic modeling, and data-intensive work in many fields) is introduced in the final chapter of the e-text. The multivariable calculus portion includes unconstrained optimization via gradients and Hessians (used for energy minimization), constrained optimization (via Lagrange multipliers, crucial in economics), gradient descent and the multivariable Chain Rule (which underlie many machine learning al more »
This course provides unified coverage of linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus, and the free course e-text connects the material to many fields. Linear algebra in large dimensions underlies the scientific, data-driven, and computational tasks of the 21st century. The linear algebra portion includes orthogonality, linear independence, matrix algebra, and eigenvalues with applications such as least squares, linear regression, and Markov chains (relevant to population dynamics, molecular chemistry, and PageRank); the singular value decomposition (essential in image compression, topic modeling, and data-intensive work in many fields) is introduced in the final chapter of the e-text. The multivariable calculus portion includes unconstrained optimization via gradients and Hessians (used for energy minimization), constrained optimization (via Lagrange multipliers, crucial in economics), gradient descent and the multivariable Chain Rule (which underlie many machine learning algorithms, such as backpropagation), and Newton's method (an ingredient in GPS and robotics). The course emphasizes computations alongside an intuitive understanding of key ideas. The widespread use of computers makes it important for users of math to understand concepts: novel users of quantitative tools in the future will be those who understand ideas and how they fit with examples and applications. This is the only course at Stanford whose syllabus includes nearly all the math background for CS 229, which is why CS 229 and CS 230 specifically recommend it (or other courses resting on it). For frequently asked questions about the differences between Math 51 and CME 100, see the FAQ on the placement page on the Math Department website. Prerequisite: Math 21 or equivalent (e.g. 5 on the AP Calculus BC test or suitable score on certain international exams: https://studentservices.stanford.edu/my-academics/earn-my-degree/undergraduate-degree-progress/test-transfer-credit/external-test-2). If you have not previously taken a calculus course at Stanford then you must have taken the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website: https://mathematics.stanford.edu/academics/math-placement) in order to register for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR
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