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  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 10 results for: EE102A

BIOE 313: Neuromorphics: Brains in Silicon (EE 207)

(Formerly EE 304) Neuromorphic systems run perceptual, cognitive and motor tasks in real-time on a network of highly interconnected nonlinear units. To maximize density and minimize energy, these units--like the brain's neurons--are heterogeneous and stochastic. The first half of the course covers learning algorithms that automatically synthesize network configurations to perform a desired computation on a given heterogeneous neural substrate. The second half of the course surveys system-on-a-chip architectures that efficiently realize highly interconnected networks and mixed analog-digital circuit designs that implement area and energy-efficient nonlinear units. Prerequisites: EE102A is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CS 349T: Project Lab: Video and Audio Technology for Live Theater in the Age of COVID (EE 192T)

This class is part of a multi-disciplinary collaboration between researchers in the CS, EE, and TAPS departments to design and develop a system to host a live theatrical production that will take place over the Internet in the winter quarter. The performing arts have been greatly affected by a transition to theater over Zoom and its competitors, none of which are great at delivering low-latency audio to actors, or high-quality audio and video to the audience, or feedback from the audience back to actors. These are big technical challenges. During the fall, we'll build a system that improves on current systems in certain areas: audio quality and latency over spotty Internet connections, video quality and realistic composited scenes with multiple actors, audience feedback, and perhaps digital puppetry. Students will learn to be part of a deadline-driven software development effort working to meet the needs of a theater director and creative specialists -- while communicating the effect o more »
This class is part of a multi-disciplinary collaboration between researchers in the CS, EE, and TAPS departments to design and develop a system to host a live theatrical production that will take place over the Internet in the winter quarter. The performing arts have been greatly affected by a transition to theater over Zoom and its competitors, none of which are great at delivering low-latency audio to actors, or high-quality audio and video to the audience, or feedback from the audience back to actors. These are big technical challenges. During the fall, we'll build a system that improves on current systems in certain areas: audio quality and latency over spotty Internet connections, video quality and realistic composited scenes with multiple actors, audience feedback, and perhaps digital puppetry. Students will learn to be part of a deadline-driven software development effort working to meet the needs of a theater director and creative specialists -- while communicating the effect of resource limits and constraints to a nontechnical audience. This is an experimental hands-on laboratory class, and our direction may shift as the creative needs of the theatrical production evolve. Based on the success of class projects and subsequent needs, some students may be invited to continue in the winter term with a research appointment (for pay or credit) to operate the system you have built and instruct actors and creative professionals how to work with the system through rehearsals and the final performance before spring break. Prerequisites: CS110 or EE102A. Recommended: familiarity with Linux, C++, and Git.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 101B: Circuits II

Continuation of EE101A. Introduction to circuit design for modern electronic systems. Modeling and analysis of analog gain stages, frequency response, feedback. Filtering and analog to digital conversion. Fundamentals of circuit simulation. Prerequisites: EE101A, EE102A. Recommended: CME102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Murmann, B. (PI)

EE 102A: Signal Processing and Linear Systems I

Concepts and tools for continuous- and discrete-time signal and system analysis with applications in signal processing, communications, and control. Mathematical representation of signals and systems. Linearity and time invariance. System impulse and step responses. System frequency response. Frequency-domain representations: Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Filtering and signal distortion. Time/frequency sampling and interpolation. Continuous-discrete-time signal conversion and quantization. Discrete-time signal processing. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or CME 102.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR
Instructors: Kahn, J. (PI)

EE 155: Green Electronics (EE 255)

Many green technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This course examines this technology and uses green-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovol-taic systems, and design of magnetic components. The course involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project. Formerly EE 152. Required: EE101B, EE102A, EE108. Recommended: ENGR40 or EE122A.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

EE 169: Introduction to Bioimaging

Bioimaging is important for both clinical medicine, and medical research. This course will provide a introduction to several of the major imaging modalities, using a signal processing perspective. The course will start with an introduction to multi-dimensional Fourier transforms, and image quality metrics. It will then study projection imaging systems (projection X-Ray), backprojection based systems (CT, PET, and SPECT), systems that use beam forming (ultrasound), and systems that use Fourier encoding (MRI). Prerequisites: EE102A, EE102B
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 192T: Project Lab: Video and Audio Technology for Live Theater in the Age of COVID (CS 349T)

This class is part of a multi-disciplinary collaboration between researchers in the CS, EE, and TAPS departments to design and develop a system to host a live theatrical production that will take place over the Internet in the winter quarter. The performing arts have been greatly affected by a transition to theater over Zoom and its competitors, none of which are great at delivering low-latency audio to actors, or high-quality audio and video to the audience, or feedback from the audience back to actors. These are big technical challenges. During the fall, we'll build a system that improves on current systems in certain areas: audio quality and latency over spotty Internet connections, video quality and realistic composited scenes with multiple actors, audience feedback, and perhaps digital puppetry. Students will learn to be part of a deadline-driven software development effort working to meet the needs of a theater director and creative specialists -- while communicating the effect o more »
This class is part of a multi-disciplinary collaboration between researchers in the CS, EE, and TAPS departments to design and develop a system to host a live theatrical production that will take place over the Internet in the winter quarter. The performing arts have been greatly affected by a transition to theater over Zoom and its competitors, none of which are great at delivering low-latency audio to actors, or high-quality audio and video to the audience, or feedback from the audience back to actors. These are big technical challenges. During the fall, we'll build a system that improves on current systems in certain areas: audio quality and latency over spotty Internet connections, video quality and realistic composited scenes with multiple actors, audience feedback, and perhaps digital puppetry. Students will learn to be part of a deadline-driven software development effort working to meet the needs of a theater director and creative specialists -- while communicating the effect of resource limits and constraints to a nontechnical audience. This is an experimental hands-on laboratory class, and our direction may shift as the creative needs of the theatrical production evolve. Based on the success of class projects and subsequent needs, some students may be invited to continue in the winter term with a research appointment (for pay or credit) to operate the system you have built and instruct actors and creative professionals how to work with the system through rehearsals and the final performance before spring break. Prerequisites: CS110 or EE102A. Recommended: familiarity with Linux, C++, and Git.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

EE 207: Neuromorphics: Brains in Silicon (BIOE 313)

(Formerly EE 304) Neuromorphic systems run perceptual, cognitive and motor tasks in real-time on a network of highly interconnected nonlinear units. To maximize density and minimize energy, these units--like the brain's neurons--are heterogeneous and stochastic. The first half of the course covers learning algorithms that automatically synthesize network configurations to perform a desired computation on a given heterogeneous neural substrate. The second half of the course surveys system-on-a-chip architectures that efficiently realize highly interconnected networks and mixed analog-digital circuit designs that implement area and energy-efficient nonlinear units. Prerequisites: EE102A is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Boahen, K. (PI)

EE 255: Green Electronics (EE 155)

Many green technologies including hybrid cars, photovoltaic energy systems, efficient power supplies, and energy-conserving control systems have at their heart intelligent, high-power electronics. This course examines this technology and uses green-tech examples to teach the engineering principles of modeling, optimization, analysis, simulation, and design. Topics include power converter topologies, periodic steady-state analysis, control, motors and drives, photovol-taic systems, and design of magnetic components. The course involves a hands-on laboratory and a substantial final project. Formerly EE 152. Required: EE101B, EE102A, EE108. Recommended: ENGR40 or EE122A.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

EE 278: Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing

Review of basic probability and random variables. Random vectors and processes; convergence and limit theorems; IID, independent increment, Markov, and Gaussian random processes; stationary random processes; autocorrelation and power spectral density; mean square error estimation, detection, and linear estimation. Formerly EE 278B. Prerequisites: EE178 and linear systems and Fourier transforms at the level of EE102A,B or EE261.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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