2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 3 of 3 results for: CSRE146

CSRE 146A: Designing Research for Social Justice: Writing a Community-Based Research Proposal (URBANST 123)

This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges invol more »
This course will support students in designing and writing a community-engaged research proposal. In contrast to "traditional" forms of research, community-engaged research uses a social justice lens in seeking to apply research to benefit communities most impacted. Community-engaged researchers also aim to challenge the power relationship between "researchers" and "researched" by working side by side with community partners in the design, conceptualization, and actualization of the research process. In this course, students will learn how to write a community-engaged research proposal. This involves forming a successful community partnership, generating meaningful research questions, and selecting means of collecting and analyzing data that best answer your research questions and support community partners. The course will also support students in developing a grounding in the theory and practice of community-engaged research, and to consider the ethical questions and challenges involved. By the end of the course, students should have a complete research proposal that can be used to apply for a number of summer funding opportunities including the Chappell Lougee Scholarship, the Community-Based Research Fellowship, Cardinal Quarter fellowships, and Major Grants. Please note that completion of the course does not guarantee funding-- rather, the course supports you in learning how to write a strong community-engaged research proposal that you can use to apply to any number of fellowships). This course is also useful for students in any academic year who are interested in pursuing community-engaged theses or capstone projects.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Tien, J. (PI)

CSRE 146B: Approaching Research in the Community: Design and Methods (URBANST 123B)

This course focuses on issues of research design and how to select specific methodological strategies to assure ethical and effective partnership-based research. In this course, students will plan for their own participation in a CBRF project. Topical themes will include best practice strategies for (a) defining and selecting community problems or issues to be addressed, (b) generating relevant and useful research questions, (c) choosing specific means and methods for data collection [e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc.], (d) storing, organizing and analyzing data, (e) reflecting on and critiquing research findings, and (f) carrying out dissemination in ways that can be expected to enhance community power and advance community development. Students will be provided with opportunities to workshop their respective projects-in-development, (e.g., developing and sharing research questions, data collection instruments, strategies for engaging community constituents as co-researchers, etc.). This is a required course for students participating in the Haas Center for Public Service Community-based Research Fellows Program, but enrollment is open to all Stanford students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

CSRE 146D: New Keywords in African Sound (AFRICAAM 146D, AFRICAST 146M, MUSIC 146M, MUSIC 246M)

This course identifies and considers new keywords for the study of contemporary African music and sound. Each week we will foster discussion around a keyword and a constellation of case studies. The sonic practices we will encounter range from South African house music to Ghanaian honk horns; from Congolese rumba bands to Tunisian trance singers; from listening to the radio in a Tanzanian homestead to making hip hop music videos on the Kenyan coast. By exploring the unexpected interconnections between contemporary African musical communities, we will discuss new keywords arising in current scholarship, including technologies like the amplifier and the hard drive, spaces like the studio and the city, and analytics like pleasure and hotness. We will also engage with established concepts for the study of postcolonial African cultures, including nationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, diaspora, and Pan-Africanism. This is a seminar-based course open to graduate students, upper level undergraduate students, and other students with consent of the instructor. Proficiency in music is not required. WIM at 4 units only.
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints