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1 - 4 of 4 results for: CS248

CS 248: Interactive Computer Graphics

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to interactive computer graphics, focusing on fundamental concepts and techniques, as well as their cross-cutting relationship to multiple problem domains in interactive graphics (such as rendering, animation, geometry, image processing). Topics include: 2D and 3D drawing, sampling theory, interpolation, rasterization, image compositing, the real-time GPU graphics pipeline (and parallel rendering), VR rendering, geometric transformations, curves and surfaces, geometric data structures, subdivision, meshing, spatial hierarchies, image processing, time integration, physically-based animation, and inverse kinematics. The course will involve several in-depth programming assignments and a self-selected final project that explores concepts covered in the class. Prerequisite: CS 107, MATH 51.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 348A: Computer Graphics: Geometric Modeling & Processing

The mathematical tools needed for the geometrical aspects of computer graphics and especially for modeling smooth shapes. The course covers classical computer-aided design, geometry processing, and data-driven approaches for shape generation. Fundamentals: homogeneous coordinates and transformation. Theory of parametric and implicit curve and surface models: polar forms, Bézier arcs and de Casteljau subdivision, continuity constraints, B-splines, tensor product, and triangular patch surfaces. Subdivision surfaces and multi-resolution representations of geometry. Surface reconstruction from scattered data points. Geometry processing on meshes, including simplification and parametrization. Deep neural generative models for 3D geometry: parametric and implicit approaches, VAEs and GANs. Prerequisite: linear algebra at the level of CME103. Recommended: CS248.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Guibas, L. (PI)

CS 348I: Computer Graphics in the Era of AI

This course introduces deep learning methods and AI technologies applied to four main areas of Computer Graphics: rendering, geometry, animation, and computational photography. We will study a wide range of problems on content creation for images, shapes, and animations, recently advanced by deep learning techniques. For each problem, we will understand its conventional solutions, study the state-of-the-art learning-based approaches, and critically evaluate their results as well as the impacts to researchers and practitioners in Computer Graphics. The topics include differentiable rendering/neural rendering, BRDF estimation, texture synthesis, denoising, procedural modeling, mesh segmentation, view prediction, colorization, style transfer, sketch simplification, character animation, physics simulation, and facial animation. Through programming projects and homework, students who successfully complete this course will be able to use neural rendering algorithms for image manipulation, to apply neural procedural modeling for shape and scene synthesis, to implement policy learning algorithms for creating character animation, and to exploit data-driven methods for simulating physical phenomena. Recommended Prerequisites: CS248, CS231N, CS229, CS205A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 348K: Visual Computing Systems

Visual computing tasks such as computational photography, image/video understanding, and real-time 3D graphics are key responsibilities of modern computer systems ranging from sensor-rich smart phones, autonomous robots, and large data centers. These workloads demand exceptional system efficiency and this course examines the key ideas, techniques, and challenges associated with the design of parallel, heterogeneous systems that execute and accelerate visual computing applications. This course is intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate-level students interested in architecting efficient graphics, image processing, and computer vision systems (both new hardware architectures and domain-optimized programming frameworks) and for students in graphics, vision, and ML that seek to understand throughput computing concepts so they can develop scalable algorithms for these platforms. Students will perform daily research paper readings, complete simple programming assignments, and compet more »
Visual computing tasks such as computational photography, image/video understanding, and real-time 3D graphics are key responsibilities of modern computer systems ranging from sensor-rich smart phones, autonomous robots, and large data centers. These workloads demand exceptional system efficiency and this course examines the key ideas, techniques, and challenges associated with the design of parallel, heterogeneous systems that execute and accelerate visual computing applications. This course is intended for graduate and advanced undergraduate-level students interested in architecting efficient graphics, image processing, and computer vision systems (both new hardware architectures and domain-optimized programming frameworks) and for students in graphics, vision, and ML that seek to understand throughput computing concepts so they can develop scalable algorithms for these platforms. Students will perform daily research paper readings, complete simple programming assignments, and compete a self-selected term project. Prerequisites: CS 107 or equivalent. Highly recommended: Parallel Computing ( CS149) or Computer Architecture ( EE 282). Students will benefit from some background in deep learning ( CS 230, CS 231N), computer vision ( CS 231A), digital image processing ( CS 232) or computer graphics ( CS248).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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