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1 - 3 of 3 results for: CS234

CS 234: Reinforcement Learning

To realize the dreams and impact of AI requires autonomous systems that learn to make good decisions. Reinforcement learning is one powerful paradigm for doing so, and it is relevant to an enormous range of tasks, including robotics, game playing, consumer modeling and healthcare. This class will briefly cover background on Markov decision processes and reinforcement learning, before focusing on some of the central problems, including scaling up to large domains and the exploration challenge. One key tool for tackling complex RL domains is deep learning and this class will include at least one homework on deep reinforcement learning. Prerequisites: proficiency in python, CS 229 or equivalents or permission of the instructor; linear algebra, basic probability.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CS 422: Interactive and Embodied Learning (EDUC 234A)

Most successful machine learning algorithms of today use either carefully curated, human-labeled datasets, or large amounts of experience aimed at achieving well-defined goals within specific environments. In contrast, people learn through their agency: they interact with their environments, exploring and building complex mental models of their world so as to be able to flexibly adapt to a wide variety of tasks. One crucial next direction in artificial intelligence is to create artificial agents that learn in this flexible and robust way. Students will read and take turns presenting current works, and they will produce a proposal of a feasible next research direction. Prerequisites: CS229, CS231N, CS234 (or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3

EDUC 234A: Interactive and Embodied Learning (CS 422)

Most successful machine learning algorithms of today use either carefully curated, human-labeled datasets, or large amounts of experience aimed at achieving well-defined goals within specific environments. In contrast, people learn through their agency: they interact with their environments, exploring and building complex mental models of their world so as to be able to flexibly adapt to a wide variety of tasks. One crucial next direction in artificial intelligence is to create artificial agents that learn in this flexible and robust way. Students will read and take turns presenting current works, and they will produce a proposal of a feasible next research direction. Prerequisites: CS229, CS231N, CS234 (or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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