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1 - 2 of 2 results for: SOC177

SOC 177: THE SOCIOLOGY OF POPULAR CULTURE

Why do some songs become popular, but not others? Why are music genres that were wildly popular in the 1950s no longer popular today? Trends and fads and can be found nearly everywhere in our daily lives movie tropes, skirt lengths, styles of shoes, internet memes, hot stock-picks all of these go in and out of fashion. But, why should they? Did something change? And if so¿what? This course seeks to understand how and why things become (un)popular. The course begins with early 20th century theories on the massification and commodification of culture and traces development of this literature over time. Topics covered include propaganda, social influence, and significant responses to questions such as: What constitutes high/low culture? Does popular culture manifest--"from the bottom-up", for the people by the people--or is popular culture dictated--"from the top down", by elites and commercial interests? To what extent do social networks (and the status and power of the people within the more »
Why do some songs become popular, but not others? Why are music genres that were wildly popular in the 1950s no longer popular today? Trends and fads and can be found nearly everywhere in our daily lives movie tropes, skirt lengths, styles of shoes, internet memes, hot stock-picks all of these go in and out of fashion. But, why should they? Did something change? And if so¿what? This course seeks to understand how and why things become (un)popular. The course begins with early 20th century theories on the massification and commodification of culture and traces development of this literature over time. Topics covered include propaganda, social influence, and significant responses to questions such as: What constitutes high/low culture? Does popular culture manifest--"from the bottom-up", for the people by the people--or is popular culture dictated--"from the top down", by elites and commercial interests? To what extent do social networks (and the status and power of the people within them) influence these relationships? How is popular culture received, interpreted, and used? Today, the media landscape looks significantly different than it did in the early 20th century, and in the final portion of the course we will consider the extent to which new technologies, media platforms, hyper-focused advertising, and cluster-based similarity algorithms have impacted the way we think about and answer these questions. In the final portion of the course, we will critically examine active and ongoing debates in the literature related to this question and produce a final paper that contributes to the discussion. No final exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

SOC 177D: Economic Elites in the 21st Century (SOC 277D)

Elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy over the past two decades, leading to serious concerns about inequality and to protests against the 1% in several countries. This course addresses the role of economic elites in the world economy and their relationship to global inequality. Topics include the evolution and consequences of global inequality, the composition of economic elites in various countries, and economic elites¿ impact on politics, education, culture, and the economy in the US and abroad. We also discuss potential solutions to global inequality.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2016 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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