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1 - 2 of 2 results for: SOC 330: Sociology of Science

LAW 2023: Law, Order & Algorithms

Human decision making is increasingly being displaced by predictive algorithms. Judges sentence defendants based on statistical risk scores; regulators take enforcement actions based on predicted violations; advertisers target materials based on demographic attributes; and employers evaluate applicants and employees based on machine-learned models. One concern with the rise of such algorithmic decision making is that it may replicate or exacerbate human bias. This course surveys the legal and ethical principles for assessing the equity of algorithms, describes statistical techniques for designing fair systems, and considers how anti-discrimination law and the design of algorithms may need to evolve to account for machine bias. Concepts will be developed in part through guided in-class coding exercises. Admission is by consent of instructor and is limited to 20 students. CONSENT APPLICATION: To enroll in the class, please complete the course application by March 15, 2021 available at: https://5harad.com/mse330/. Elements used in grading: Grading is based on response papers, class participation, and a final project. Cross-listed with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity ( CSRE 230), Management Science & Engineering (MS&E 330), Sociology ( SOC 279).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

SOC 330: Sociology of Science (EDUC 120, EDUC 320, STS 200Q)

The sociology of science concerns the social structures and practices by which human beings interpret, use and create intellectual innovations. In particular we will explore the claim that scientific facts are socially constructed and ask whether such a characterization has limits. Course readings will concern the formation and decline of various thought communities, intellectual social movements, scientific disciplines, and broader research paradigms. A special focus will be placed on interdisciplinarity as we explore whether the collision of fields can result in new scientific advances. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
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