2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 1 of 1 results for: POLISCI 235N: Topics in Comparative Political Theory

POLISCI 235N: Topics in Comparative Political Theory

Comparative Political Theory (CPT) has emerged as one of the most important fields in political theory. Scholars working on CPT generally agree that "mainstream" political theorizing, which is dominated by modern Western way of thinking, fails to recognize the unique contributions of non-Western intellectual traditions, and is insufficient in coping with new and pressing issues in a globalized world. To study political theory from a comparative perspective, they argue, is to learn from non-Western classics and thinkers and bring non-Western political experiences to the forefront of normativenpolitical reflections. This course is an introduction to comparative political theory as a field and an exploration of several non-Western traditions and their perspectives on politics. Instead of surveying the canons in each religion or civilization, such as foundational texts in Buddhism, Catholicism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, we will try to understand non-Western perspectives b more »
Comparative Political Theory (CPT) has emerged as one of the most important fields in political theory. Scholars working on CPT generally agree that "mainstream" political theorizing, which is dominated by modern Western way of thinking, fails to recognize the unique contributions of non-Western intellectual traditions, and is insufficient in coping with new and pressing issues in a globalized world. To study political theory from a comparative perspective, they argue, is to learn from non-Western classics and thinkers and bring non-Western political experiences to the forefront of normativenpolitical reflections. This course is an introduction to comparative political theory as a field and an exploration of several non-Western traditions and their perspectives on politics. Instead of surveying the canons in each religion or civilization, such as foundational texts in Buddhism, Catholicism, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, and Judaism, we will try to understand non-Western perspectives by examining key political issues in contemporary political theory and world politics, including but not limited to human rights, democracy, political legitimacy, law, toleration, and world order. Attention is given to how non-Western thinkers conceive of modernity and the West and how they reinterpret their respective traditions to answer the challenges fromnliberalism and democracy. We will see that non-Western societies are active and dynamic arenas of political debate, rather than passive receivers of Western political ideas.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Jiang, D. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints