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1 - 10 of 51 results for: POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

ECON 221: Political Economy II (POLISCI 460B)

Continuation of ECON 220 / POLISCI 460A. Preparation for advanced research in political economy. This quarter will focus on topics related to culture, institutions, political and economic development, historical evolution, nondemocratic politics, conflict and cooperation. We will cover both empirical and theoretical work. Prerequisite for Political Science PhDnstudents: POLISCI 356A.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

LAW 7036: Law of Democracy

This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 361) International Policy ( INTLPOL 351), and Political Science ( POLISCI 327C).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Persily, N. (PI)

LAW 7057: Policy, Politics and the 2020 Elections: What 2020 Means for Future Campaigns and Elections

This course looks back at the 2020 election campaign and tries to discern lessons and takeaways for future campaigns and elections. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns, including the Trump and Biden teams. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Final Paper. Cross-listed with Communication ( COMM 153A, 253A), Political Science ( POLISCI 72), and Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 146, 246).
Terms: Win | Units: 2

LAW 7096: Law and Politics of Bureaucracy

Modern government is bureaucratic government. In the words of Justice Jackson, the rise of the administrative state is likely "the most significant legal trend of the last century and perhaps more values today are affected by [agency] decisions than by those of all the courts." This seminar will survey the major ways in which law and political science have grappled with bureaucratic governance. How do we understand the rise of the administrative state? Why are bureaucracies designed the way they are? How do bureaucracies work in the face of legal and political constraints? And what avenues are there for meaningful regulatory reform? The class is cross-listed in political science and the law school and course enrollment will be by consent of instructor. Students will be responsible for writing short reflection papers and a research paper. Students may take the course for either 3, 4, or 5 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Admission based on application. Instructor consent required. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply, please complete the following webform by TBA: https://forms.gle/ZBtFE5Xdh2UwBEHb8. Cross-listed with Political Science ( POLISCI 228C/428C).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Ho, D. (PI)

POLISCI 1: The Science of Politics

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 13N: Identity Politics 101

How do we understand the political choices citizens make? Why do Black and White Americans disagree so vehemently about racially-charged incidents like officer-involved shootings? What explains disagreements over policies like welfare and immigration? How do we understand ethnic conflict, both in the United States and around the world? What explains our commitments to salient social groups? Under what conditions should we expect group members to join in solidarity with one another? When does solidarity break down? And what helps us make sense of this strange time we find ourselves in? Identity does that--or at least it does a lot of it. But what is an identity? What are the conditions under which identities becomenpoliticized? How do identities work to structure attitudes and affect behavior? Over the course of the quarter, we will read a series of scholarly papers from across academic disciplines that provide some answers to these important questions.nStudents will be expected to enga more »
How do we understand the political choices citizens make? Why do Black and White Americans disagree so vehemently about racially-charged incidents like officer-involved shootings? What explains disagreements over policies like welfare and immigration? How do we understand ethnic conflict, both in the United States and around the world? What explains our commitments to salient social groups? Under what conditions should we expect group members to join in solidarity with one another? When does solidarity break down? And what helps us make sense of this strange time we find ourselves in? Identity does that--or at least it does a lot of it. But what is an identity? What are the conditions under which identities becomenpoliticized? How do identities work to structure attitudes and affect behavior? Over the course of the quarter, we will read a series of scholarly papers from across academic disciplines that provide some answers to these important questions.nStudents will be expected to engage the readings carefully and to participate in classroom discussions. Assignments will include reaction papers and a final presentation. By the end of our time together, I hope to convince you that all politics is identity politics, and that identity--in all of its complexity--is a thing worth thinking rigorously about. All students are encouraged to join, as we will benefit from the diversity of experiences and backgrounds that each of us brings to thenclassroom.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

POLISCI 46N: Contemporary African Politics

Africa has lagged behind the rest of the developing world in terms of three consequential outcomes: economic development, the establishment of social order through effective governance, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and to examine recent examples of success pointing to a more hopeful future. Students will be asked to develop expertise on one or two African countries and report regularly to fellow students on the progress (or lack thereof) of their countries on each outcome and the reasons for it.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED
Instructors: Laitin, D. (PI)

POLISCI 57E: State of the Union 2014 (HISTORY 57E)

This course will examine major themes that contribute to the health, or disease, of the US body politic. Challenges and opportunities abound: we live in an age of rising inequality, dazzling technological innovation, economic volatility, geopolitical uncertainty, and the accumulating impact of climate change. These conditions confront our political leaders and us as citizens of a democracy plagued by dysfunction. What are the implications for the body politic? Led by Rob Reich (Political Science, Stanford), David Kennedy (History, Stanford), and James Steyer (CEO, Common Sense Media), the course will bring together distinguished analysts of American politics. Together, we will examine the following topics: inequality; energy and the environment; media and technology; the economy; and the 2014 midterm elections. The course is designed for the entire Stanford community: jointly offered for undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford (through listings in Political Science and History) and for community members through the Continuing Studies Program. For students, the course is available for 1 credit. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.
Last offered: Autumn 2014

POLISCI 72: Policy, Politics and the 2020 Elections: What 2020 Means for Future Campaigns and Elections (COMM 153A, COMM 253A, PUBLPOL 146, PUBLPOL 246)

(Same as LAW 7057). This course looks back at the 2020 election campaign and tries to discern lessons and takeaways for future campaigns and elections. It will provide students with a behind-the-scenes understanding of how campaigns work. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to high-profile campaigns -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature prominent guest speakers who have served and will serve in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns, including the Trump and Biden teams.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
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