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1 - 6 of 6 results for: PHIL227

PHIL 227: Kant's Foundations of Morality, 2nd Critique (PHIL 127)

(Graduate students enroll in 227.) A study of Kant's ethical thought, focusing on The Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, The Critique of Practical Reason, and The Metaphysics of Morals. Prerequisite: Phil. 2, Phil. 170, or equivalent (consult the instructor). Designed for undergraduate department majors and graduate students.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Friedman, M. (PI)

PHIL 227A: Kant's Value Theory (PHIL 127A)

(Graduate students register for 227A.) The role of autonomy, principled rational self-governance, in Kant's account of the norms to which human beings are answerable as moral agents, citizens, empirical inquirers, and religious believers. Relations between moral values (goodness, rightness) and aesthetic values (beauty, sublimity).
Last offered: Autumn 2014

PHIL 227B: Kant's Anthropology and Philosophy of History (PHIL 127B)

Kant's conception of anthropology or human nature, based on his philosophy of history, which influenced and anticipated 18th- and 19th-century philosophers of history such as Herder, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx. Texts include Idea for a Universal History, Conjectural Beginning of Human History, and Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View. Topics include: Kant's pragmatic approach to the study of human nature; the difficulty of human self knowledge; the role of regulative and teleological principles in studying human history; and Kant's theory of race.

PHIL 227C: Rousseau and Kant

Kant considered Rousseau ¿the Newton of the moral world.¿ A portrait of Rousseau was reportedly the only decoration in Kant¿s study, and it was Kant¿s reading of Émile, or On Education and On the Social Contract in the early 1760s which, more than anything else, first awakened Kant¿s interest in moral philosophy. In a three-day intensive mini-course, we will explore the relation between Rousseau¿s philosophy and Kant¿s on such topics as the standards of right and virtue, human equality, the relation of reason and feeling in human nature, and the philosophy of history.

PHIL 227M: Richard Rufus of Cornwall (PHIL 127M)

Metaphysics and Epistemology, readings from Rufus' newly translated Contra Averroem & Speculum animae. In these works, Rufus solves a problem for Aristotelian epistemology that was to bedevil later scolastics such as Thomas Aquinas. He also states for the first time a theory of individuation by form that was subsequently adopted by Duns Scotus. Though Scotus like Rufus preferred to speak of individual forms, the theory itself is often identified by a term very seldom used by Scotus, `haeceitas' or thisness. Taughtly jointly by Rega Wood and Calvin Normore.
Last offered: Spring 2014

PHIL 227W: Introducing Ockham & His Razor: Mind & Metaphysics, Logic, Epistemology, & Ethics

Three day mini course on topics in Medieval Philosophy. This year's topic is "Introducing Ockham & His Razor: Mind & Metaphysics, Logic, Epistemology, & Ethics." Course runs June 2-4, 2017. Guest lectures by Peter King (Toronto), Elizabeth Karger (CNRS, Paris).n We begin with a general introduction to Ockham's place in the history of philosophy from Democritus to Descartes. Then we turn to Ockham's logic and his most popular work, the Summa logicae. In this connection we will discuss Ockham's distinction between absolute and connotative terms and his theory of supposition, a theory that corresponds roughly to modern reference theory. n On day two we take up Ockham's Epistemology, the distinction he drew between intuitive & abstractive cognition, his approach to problems of certainty and judgment, and his response to skeptical worries. In this connection we will discuss the razor in its application of sensible species. That afternoon our topic will be nominalist metaphysics & the razor more »
Three day mini course on topics in Medieval Philosophy. This year's topic is "Introducing Ockham & His Razor: Mind & Metaphysics, Logic, Epistemology, & Ethics." Course runs June 2-4, 2017. Guest lectures by Peter King (Toronto), Elizabeth Karger (CNRS, Paris).n We begin with a general introduction to Ockham's place in the history of philosophy from Democritus to Descartes. Then we turn to Ockham's logic and his most popular work, the Summa logicae. In this connection we will discuss Ockham's distinction between absolute and connotative terms and his theory of supposition, a theory that corresponds roughly to modern reference theory. n On day two we take up Ockham's Epistemology, the distinction he drew between intuitive & abstractive cognition, his approach to problems of certainty and judgment, and his response to skeptical worries. In this connection we will discuss the razor in its application of sensible species. That afternoon our topic will be nominalist metaphysics & the razor as Ockham deploys the principle of parsimony to justify his denial of common natures and his rejection of some of the Aristotelian categories, such as motion and relation. More generally we see an approach to physics with minimal reliance on metaphysics.n Day three begins with philosophy of mind. Here we will see Ockham refusing to posit faculties of will and intellect distinct from the intellective soul itself, while admitting a distinction between the sensitive and intellective souls. The course will close with a discussion of Ockham's ethics and politics. In ethics we will consider the ground of the good and the connection of the virtues; in politics we will focus on property rights, a major source of controversy within the church.n Undergraduates are welcome to take the course, but must have the instructor's permission.
Last offered: Spring 2017 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 10 units total)
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