2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 11 results for: MATH 21: Calculus

CHEM 4: Biochemistry: Chemistry of Life

A four-week intensive biochemistry course from a chemical perspective. The chemical basis of life, including the biomolecular chemistry of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, as well as enzyme kinetics and mechanisms, thermodynamics, and core metabolism, control, and regulation. Recitation includes group work on case studies that support the daily lecture material. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, 121, 123 or 1 year of organic chemistry; Math 19, 20, 21 or 1 year of single variable calculus.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Summer 2018 | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 100: Vector Calculus for Engineers (ENGR 154)

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green's, divergence, and Stokes' theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: knowledge of single-variable calculus equivalent to the content of Math 19-21 (e.g., 5 on Calc BC, 4 on Calc BC with Math 21, 5 on Calc AB with Math21). Placement diagnostic (recommendation non binding) at:( https://exploredegrees.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptext).
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CME 102: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (ENGR 155A)

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields.Prerequisites: knowledge of single-variable calculus equivalent to the content of Math 19-21 (e.g., 5 on Calc BC, 4 on Calc BC with Math 21, 5 on Calc AB with Math21). Placement diagnostic (recommendation non binding) at:( https://exploredegrees.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptext). Recommended: CME100.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 154: Vector Calculus for Engineers (CME 100)

Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGR 155A: Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (CME 102)

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields.Prerequisites: knowledge of single-variable calculus equivalent to the content of Math 19-21 (e.g., 5 on Calc BC, 4 on Calc BC with Math 21, 5 on Calc AB with Math21). Placement diagnostic (recommendation non binding) at:( https://exploredegrees.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptext). Recommended: CME100.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 21: Calculus

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 21A: Calculus, ACE

Students attend MATH 21 lectures with different recitation sessions: two hours per week instead of one, emphasizing engineering applications. Prerequisite: application; see https://web.stanford.edu/dept/soe/osa/ace.fb
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

MATH 51: Linear Algebra, Multivariable Calculus, and Modern Applications

This course provides unified coverage of linear algebra and multivariable differential calculus. It discusses applications connecting the material to many quantitative fields. Linear algebra in large dimensions underlies the scientific, data-driven, and computational tasks of the 21st century. The linear algebra portion of the course includes orthogonality, linear independence, matrix algebra, and eigenvalues as well as ubiquitious applications: least squares, linear regression, Markov chains (relevant to population dynamics, molecular chemistry, and PageRank), singular value decomposition (essential in image compression, topic modeling, and data-intensive work in the natural sciences), and more. The multivariable calculus material includes unconstrained optimization via gradients and Hessians (used for energy minimization in physics and chemistry), constrained optimization (via Lagrange multipliers, crucial in economics), gradient descent and the multivariable Chain Rule (which underlie many machine learning algorithms, such as backpropagation), and Newton's method (a crucial part of how GPS works). The course emphasizes computations alongside an intuitive understanding of key ideas, making students well-prepared for further study of mathematics and its applications to other fields. The widespread use of computers makes it more important, not less, for users of math to understand concepts: in all scientific fields, novel users of quantitative tools in the future will be those who understand ideas and how they fit with applications and examples. This is the only course at Stanford whose syllabus includes nearly all the math background for CS 229, which is why CS 229 and CS 230 specifically recommend it (or other courses resting on it). For frequently asked questions about the differences between Math 51 and CME 100, see the FAQ on the placement page on the math department website. Prerequisite: 21, 42, or the math placement diagnostic (offered through the Math Department website) in order to register for this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-FR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 41: Mechanics

How are motions of objects in the physical world determined by laws of physics? Students learn to describe the motion of objects (kinematics) and then understand why motions have the form they do (dynamics). Emphasis on how the important physical principles in mechanics, such as conservation of momentum and energy for translational and rotational motion, follow from just three laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion. Distinction made between fundamental laws of nature and empirical rules that are useful approximations for more complex physics. Problems drawn from examples of mechanics in everyday life. Skills developed in verifying that derived results satisfy criteria for correctness, such as dimensional consistency and expected behavior in limiting cases. Discussions based on language of mathematics, particularly vector representations and operations, and calculus. Physical understanding fostered by peer interaction and demonstrations in lecture, and discussion sections based on interactive group problem solving. In order to register for this class students must EITHER have already taken an introductory Physics class (20, 40, or 60 sequence) or have taken the Physics Placement Diagnostic at https://physics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-students/placement-diagnostic. Prerequisite: High school physics and MATH 20 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent. Minimum co-requisite: MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

PHYSICS 43: Electricity and Magnetism

Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints