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1 - 10 of 15 results for: HISTORY 21: The History of 2021

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade. In AY 2020-21, a 'CR' grade will satisfy the WAYS requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

CSRE 151C: Ethical STEM: Race, Justice, and Embodied Practice (STS 51D, SYMSYS 151D, TAPS 151D)

What role do science and technology play in the creation of a just society? How do we confront and redress the impact of racism and bias within the history, theory, and practice of these disciplines? This course invites students to grapple with the complex intersections between race, inequality, justice, and the STEM fields. We orient to these questions from an artistically-informed position, asking how we can rally the embodied practices of artists to address how we think, make, and respond to each other. Combining readings from the history of science, technology, and medicine, ethics and pedagogy, as well as the fine and performing arts, we will embark together on understanding how our STEM practices have emerged, how we participate today, and what we can imagine for them in the future. The course will involve workshops, field trips (as possible), and invited guests. All students, from any discipline, field, interest, and background, are welcome! This course does build upon the STS 51 series from 2020-21, though it is not a prerequisite for this course. Please contact the professor if you have any questions!
Terms: Win | Units: 4

FEMGEN 143: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault (SOC 188, SOC 288)

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past decade the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successf more »
TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past decade the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of the end of that administration. At the same time, the Obama administration's heightened response led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately and appeared to be more concerned with protection the institutional brand than with stopping rape or protecting student rights. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. In an about-face that many found shocking, the Trump Administration rescinded all of the Obama-era guidance on the subject of sexual harassment and has promulgated new proposed regulations that would offer significantly greater protection to accused students and to institutions and commensurately less protection to survivors. An increasingly partisan Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue. It is unclear whether or to what extent the incoming Biden Administration will move to withdraw or amend the DeVos regulations. Meanwhile in schools have moved toward adopting an uneven patchwork of policies in which some schools cover conduct (for example, off campus conduct) that DeVos excluded from the purview of Title IX under the ambit of "supplemental" conduct policies and procedures setting up policy confusion and inequalities for students of different schools. This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault and harassment on college campuses. Each week we will read, dissect, compare and critique a set of readings that include social science, history, literature, legal, policy, journalism, and narrative explorations of the topic of campus sexual assault. We will explore the history of gender-based violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will critically explore the ways that responses to this violence have varied by the race, class, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other characteristics of parties and institutions. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, activists, journalists, and policymakers. This year we will also host special guest speaker Chanel Miller, author of the bestselling memoir Know My Name. The subject matter of this course is sensitive, and students are expected to treat the material with maturity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short reflection papers and a class presentation (section 01) or an independent research paper or project and class presentation (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 into section 02, which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here https://law.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/21-22-Win-One-in-Five-LAW-7065-FEMGEN-143-SOC-188-SOC-288-Michele-Landis-Dauber-Emma-Tsurkov-Consent-Form.docx or email etsurkov@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the class is full. Demand for the class is high and participation is capped at 18. The class usually fills quickly, so make sure to apply early. Cross-listed with the School of Law ( LAW 7065), Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies ( FEMGEN 143), and Sociology ( SOC 188/288). This course is being taught remotely over Zoom.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

GERMAN 130A: A History of German Opera

When we think of opera, and perhaps especially German opera, a list of stereotypes immediately springs to mind: tenors who refuse to die, horned helmets and blond braids, an artform so elite that it has lost all relevance in the contemporary world. While not discounting those images, this course will position opera at the center of Germany's historical and cultural development over the past three centuries - from early discussions about the country's place between the more culturally hegemonic Italy and France, to its struggle for unification in the 19th century, to the Third Reich's co-opting of all 'German' forms of expression to serve its ends. We will discuss German opera's link to movements like Romanticism and Expressionism, and to philosophers like Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Along the way, we will learn how to listen to and talk about this very strange genre, and gain fluency in a range of musical styles and periods. No musical expertise required; taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 21 or instructor permission.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Goodling, E. (PI)

HISTORY 21: The History of 2021

How can we understand the events, ideas, and conflicts that have featured in the news cycle during the past year? "The History of 2021" offers historically informed reflections on this year's momentous events, providing an opportunity to understand our world in its historic context. Each week will feature a different History faculty member speaking on a major news topic of the year, showing what we can learn by approaching it from a historical perspective. The course is open to all students (newcomers and history veterans alike) who want to reflect on the challenges and opportunities of 2021, and who are curious to consider how studying history can offer a deeper and richer understanding of tumultuous times.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade. In AY 2020-21, a 'CR' grade will satisfy the WAYS requirement.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

LAW 7065: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past decade the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successf more »
TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past decade the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of the end of that administration. At the same time, the Obama administration's heightened response led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately and appeared to be more concerned with protection the institutional brand than with stopping rape or protecting student rights. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. In an about-face that many found shocking, the Trump Administration rescinded all of the Obama-era guidance on the subject of sexual harassment and has promulgated new proposed regulations that would offer significantly greater protection to accused students and to institutions and commensurately less protection to survivors. An increasingly partisan Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue. It is unclear whether or to what extent the incoming Biden Administration will move to withdraw or amend the DeVos regulations. Meanwhile in schools have moved toward adopting an uneven patchwork of policies in which some schools cover conduct (for example, off campus conduct) that DeVos excluded from the purview of Title IX under the ambit of "supplemental" conduct policies and procedures setting up policy confusion and inequalities for students of different schools. This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault and harassment on college campuses. Each week we will read, dissect, compare and critique a set of readings that include social science, history, literature, legal, policy, journalism, and narrative explorations of the topic of campus sexual assault. We will explore the history of gender-based violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will critically explore the ways that responses to this violence have varied by the race, class, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other characteristics of parties and institutions. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, activists, journalists, and policymakers. This year we will also host special guest speaker Chanel Miller, author of the bestselling memoir Know My Name. The subject matter of this course is sensitive, and students are expected to treat the material with maturity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them. Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and either several short reflection papers and a class presentation (section 01) or an independent research paper or project and class presentation (section 02). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section 01 into section 02, which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here https://law.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/21-22-Win-One-in-Five-LAW-7065-FEMGEN-143-SOC-188-SOC-288-Michele-Landis-Dauber-Emma-Tsurkov-Consent-Form.docx or email etsurkov@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the class is full. Demand for the class is high and participation is capped at 18. The class usually fills quickly, so make sure to apply early. Cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies ( FEMGEN 143) and Sociology ( SOC 188/288). This course is being taught remotely over Zoom.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

MUSIC 40: Music History to 1600

Pre- or corequisite: 21.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

MUSIC 141K: Josquin at 500 (MUSIC 241K)

Last summer marked 500 years since the death of Josquin des Prez. This singer-composer, the son of a crooked cop, brought into being a wealth of musical techniques that we still cherish, and take for granted, today. Drawing on exciting new findings and the tools of the Josquin Research Project ( josquin.stanford.edu), this writing-in-the-major course asks what makes Josquin's music special while delving into longstanding problems concerning his life and works. Students will learn about one of the most important figures in the history of music, develop skills in reading, writing, and musical analysis, and improve their ability to reason well. Prerequisites: MUSIC 21, MUSIC 40. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Rodin, J. (PI)

MUSIC 241K: Josquin at 500 (MUSIC 141K)

Last summer marked 500 years since the death of Josquin des Prez. This singer-composer, the son of a crooked cop, brought into being a wealth of musical techniques that we still cherish, and take for granted, today. Drawing on exciting new findings and the tools of the Josquin Research Project ( josquin.stanford.edu), this writing-in-the-major course asks what makes Josquin's music special while delving into longstanding problems concerning his life and works. Students will learn about one of the most important figures in the history of music, develop skills in reading, writing, and musical analysis, and improve their ability to reason well. Prerequisites: MUSIC 21, MUSIC 40. (WIM at 4-unit level only.)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Rodin, J. (PI)
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