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1 - 8 of 8 results for: CS377

CS 377: Topics in Human-Computer Interaction

Contents change each quarter. May be repeated for credit. See http://hci.stanford.edu/academics for offerings.
| Repeatable for credit

CS 377E: Designing Solutions to Global Grand Challenges

In this course we creatively apply information technologies to collectively attack Global Grand Challenges (e.g., global warming, rising healthcare costs and declining access, and ensuring quality education for all). Interdisciplinary student teams will carry out need-finding within a target domain, followed by brainstorming to propose a quarter long project. Teams will spend the rest of the quarter applying user-centered design methods to rapidly iterate through design, prototyping, and testing of their solutions. This course will interweave a weekly lecture with a weekly studio session where students apply the techniques hands-on in a small-scale, supportive environment.
Last offered: Spring 2019

CS 377G: Designing Serious Games

Over the last few years we have seen the rise of "serious games" to promote understanding of complex social and ecological challenges, and to create passion for solving them. This project-based course provides an introduction to game design principals while applying them to games that teach. Run as a hands-on studio class, students will design and prototype games for social change and civic engagement. We will learn the fundamentals of games design via lecture and extensive reading in order to make effective games to explore issues facing society today. The course culminates in an end-of- quarter open house to showcase our games. Prerequisite: CS147 or equivalent. 247G recommended, but not required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4

CS 377N: Introduction to the Design of Smart Products (ME 216M)

This course will focus on the technical mechatronic skills as well as the human factors and interaction design considerations required for the design of smart products and devices. Students will learn techniques for rapid prototyping of smart devices, best practices for physical interaction design, fundamentals of affordances and signifiers, and interaction across networked devices. Students will be introduced to design guidelines for integrating electrical components such as PCBs into mechanical assemblies and consider the physical form of devices, not just as enclosures but also as a central component of the smart product. Prerequisites include: CS106A and E40 highly recommended, or instructor approval.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 377P: Advanced User Interface Design Patterns

User interface design is about creating the most effective, intuitive design possible to help users achieve a specific goal. While understanding users is one part of the equation, the other part is a strong understanding of user interface design rules and patterns that you can apply to solve their needs. This course will deep dive into user interface design across mobile, desktop, and wearable platforms covering common patterns, when to use them, and when to break them. Each week will cover a different user interface design challenge and explore the patterns in areas such as data input, search & filters, tables and lists, content organization, navigation, dark patterns and more. Through the use of in class exercises, integrated design challenges, and an exploration of examples, students will leave the class knowing how to integrate user interface patterns into their design work to create powerful, effective digital experiences. Prerequisite: CS 147 or equivalent. 247 recommended but not required.

CS 377Q: Designing for Accessibility

Designing for accessibility is a valuable and important skill in the UX community. As businesses are becoming more aware of the needs and scope of people with some form of disability, the benefits of universal design, where designing for accessibility ends up benefitting everyone, are becoming more apparent. This class introduces fundamental Human Computer Interaction (HCI) concepts and skills in designing for accessibility. Student projects will identify an accessibility need, prototype a design solution, and conduct a user study with a person with a disability. Prerequisites: Background in human-centered design (e.g., CS 147, CS 247, ME 115A, or a d.school class) is required. Web or mobile programming experience (e.g., CS 142), or experience with qualitative user studies may be helpful. The class involves team design projects and prototyping.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

CS 377T: Topics in Human-Computer Interaction: Teaching Studio Classes

Studio teaching is a practice that dates back to the apprentice days of art studios. In this course, you will learn to teach project based classes that include critique. We will also cover effective coaching, design of projects and exercises, and curating material in order to maximize the effectiveness of a flipped classroom. Recommended for TAs in HCI.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CS 377U: Understanding Users

This project-based class focuses on understanding the use of technology in the world. Students will learn generative and evaluative research methods to explore how systems are appropriated into everyday life in a quarter-long project where they design, implement and evaluate a novel mobile application. Quantitative (e.g. A/B testing, instrumentation, analytics, surveys) and qualitative (e.g. diary studies, contextual inquiry, ethnography) methods and their combination will be covered along with practical experience applying these methods in their project. Prerequisites: CS 147, 193A/193P (or equivalent mobile programming experience).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
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