2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 15 results for: blockchain

CS 58: You Say You Want a Revolution (Blockchain Edition)

This project-based course will give creative students an opportunity to work together on revolutionary change leveraging blockchain technology. The course will provide opportunities for students to become operationally familiar with blockchain concepts, supported by presentation of blockchain fundamentals at a level accessible to those with or without a strong technical background. Specific topics include: incentives, ethics, crypto-commons, values, FOMO 3D, risks, implications and social good. Students will each discover a new possible use-case for blockchain and prototype their vision for the future accordingly. Application and impact areas may come from medicine, law, economics, history, anthropology, or other sectors. Student diversity of background will be valued highly.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 251: Cryptocurrencies and blockchain technologies

For advanced undergraduates and for graduate students. The potential applications for Bitcoin-like technologies is enormous. The course will cover the technical aspects of cryptocurrencies, blockchain technologies, and distributed consensus. Students will learn how these systems work and how to engineer secure software that interacts with the Bitcoin network and other cryptocurrencies. Prerequisite: CS110. Recommended: CS255.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 152: The Future of Finance (ECON 252, PUBLPOL 364)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today inclu more »
(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ECON 252: The Future of Finance (ECON 152, PUBLPOL 364)

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today inclu more »
(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GSBGEN 578: Is the Internet Broken?

This interdisciplinary course examines the promise, peril, and possible future of the Internet and the impact of the World Wide Web on our lives. We will explore the most pressing contemporary issues facing the Internet, including debates on privacy, antitrust, freedom of speech, access, neutrality, and regulation. We will also unpack the claim that "decentralization," as it has grown with new technologies such as blockchain and crypto assets, captures the original vision of the Internet. A key question we will address is: What should be the roles of markets, governments, and different stakeholders in shaping the Internet? Students will have the opportunity to reflect on their own motivations and roles as digital consumers, potential innovators, and future leaders in this process. Guests from the tech sector and elsewhere will enrich our discussion. Co-Instructor: Jonathan Dotan.
Units: 2 | Grading: GSB Student Option LTR/PF

LAW 1031: Current Issues in Business Law

This course will focus on issues in law and business that are both important to practitioners and the subject of academic or policy debates. We will cover a range of legal and economic issues, including the following topics: nonbank lending, gatekeeper liability, capital repatriation and tax policy, corporate restructuring, blockchain and smart contracts, and cyber risk management. Each of these issues will be introduced by readings and presentations, but the classes will rely on student discussion and critical evaluation of the papers and positions we examine. Students will have the opportunity to write reaction papers that critically analyze the required readings and to learn and analyze other business law issues of their choice by working in groups. Elements used in grading: Reaction papers, class participation, and performance in the group project and presentation.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 1038: The Future of Finance

If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new a more »
If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration) to the instructor(s). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration) to the instructor(s). See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Cross-listed with Economics ( ECON 152/252), Public Policy ( PUBLPOL 364), Statistics ( STATS 238).
Terms: Win, last offered Winter 2018 | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 1043: Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies: Law, Economics, Business and Policy

Blockchain and cryptocurrency technologies have spawned an extensive and rapidly growing set of businesses along with a corresponding rapidly expanding need for lawyers and regulators with the required expertise. This course provides core background for legal, policy, or business work in the field by nurturing three areas of understanding: (1) the technologies themselves; (2) the scope and nature of business applications; and (3) the pertinent legal and regulatory structures with particular emphasis on securities regulation aspects. Elements used in grading: Exam.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Strnad, J. (PI)

LAW 1044: Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies: Technical Background

Course description: TBA
Terms: not given this year | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 1051: Payment Systems: Cryptocurrencies

This seminar is designed to afford students the opportunity to study the regulation of new, cutting edge payment systems that employ blockchain technology. To do so, students will familiarize themselves with the current state of the law of payment systems as represented in the Uniform Commercial Code, the National Bank Act, and other relevant statutes. Students will then engage readings regarding the regulatory difficulties presented by the realities of cryptocurrency technology. We will start with the history of digital currency, then look at the laws, organizations, trends, and communities behind it to build a complete picture of the ecosystem surrounding blockchain technology. Each student will present and discuss a paper on a topic of interest within the world of cryptocurrencies generally. Each of the students will research and write a paper on cryptocurrency regulation or regulatory technology as the principle component of their final grades. Students have two options. Those taki more »
This seminar is designed to afford students the opportunity to study the regulation of new, cutting edge payment systems that employ blockchain technology. To do so, students will familiarize themselves with the current state of the law of payment systems as represented in the Uniform Commercial Code, the National Bank Act, and other relevant statutes. Students will then engage readings regarding the regulatory difficulties presented by the realities of cryptocurrency technology. We will start with the history of digital currency, then look at the laws, organizations, trends, and communities behind it to build a complete picture of the ecosystem surrounding blockchain technology. Each student will present and discuss a paper on a topic of interest within the world of cryptocurrencies generally. Each of the students will research and write a paper on cryptocurrency regulation or regulatory technology as the principle component of their final grades. Students have two options. Those taking the course for 2 units (Section 01) will write papers that meet the PW (Professional Writing) requirement. Students taking the course for 3 units (Section 02) will write a long research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from Section (01) into Section (02), which meets the R (Research) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
Instructors: Cole, G. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints