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1 - 10 of 20 results for: Understanding Race & Ethnicity

AFRICAAM 118X: Exploring Race and Ethnicity through Family History (AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S, CSRE 118S)

Who determines which narratives of race and difference are included in the national memory? In what ways does the family represent an archive for understanding race and social power in the United States? How does your own family history support or subvert dominant historical narratives of race and difference in the United States? Approaching race as an intersectional construct always defined by class, gender, and sexuality, this course examines family history as a site for understanding race, social power, and difference in American society. Topics to be discussed will include the family as an archive for understanding racial difference; family photo collections as sites through which ideas of race and ethnicity are contested and reinforced; and oral history as a tool for documenting family memories of race and social difference. Assignments will encourage students to apply course theories and readings to their own family histories as a means of better understanding the history of race and difference in the United States.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

AMSTUD 118: Exploring Race and Ethnicity through Family History (AFRICAAM 118X, ASNAMST 118S, CSRE 118S)

Who determines which narratives of race and difference are included in the national memory? In what ways does the family represent an archive for understanding race and social power in the United States? How does your own family history support or subvert dominant historical narratives of race and difference in the United States? Approaching race as an intersectional construct always defined by class, gender, and sexuality, this course examines family history as a site for understanding race, social power, and difference in American society. Topics to be discussed will include the family as an archive for understanding racial difference; family photo collections as sites through which ideas of race and ethnicity are contested and reinforced; and oral history as a tool for documenting family memories of race and social difference. Assignments will encourage students to apply course theories and readings to their own family histories as a means of better understanding the history of race and difference in the United States.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

ANTHRO 32: Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective (CSRE 32)

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ASNAMST 107: Asian American Leadership: Controversies, Dilemmas, and Decision-Making Strategies

This course examines the experiences of Asian Americans in a variety of contemporary leadership contexts to identify the complexities of race, gender, class, and ethnicity for both understanding and responding to social relations of power. Through seminar discussion, readings, guest speakers, case studies, and experiential activities, students evaluate situated practices of Asian American leadership in consideration of longstanding themes that have animated the field of Asian American Studies: self- and collective identification, representation and equality, community organizing and advocacy, interracial coalition-building, and minority empowerment. Students explore how Asian American leadership is conceptualized, practiced, and assessed in relation to the following contexts: campus and community activism o f the Asian American movement of the 1960s to the present, institutional settings of employment, electoral politics, the field of Asian American Studies, and public intellectual life. A multidisciplinary approach will draw upon anthropology, psychology, political science, sociology, and Asian American Studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2015 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ASNAMST 118S: Exploring Race and Ethnicity through Family History (AFRICAAM 118X, AMSTUD 118, CSRE 118S)

Who determines which narratives of race and difference are included in the national memory? In what ways does the family represent an archive for understanding race and social power in the United States? How does your own family history support or subvert dominant historical narratives of race and difference in the United States? Approaching race as an intersectional construct always defined by class, gender, and sexuality, this course examines family history as a site for understanding race, social power, and difference in American society. Topics to be discussed will include the family as an archive for understanding racial difference; family photo collections as sites through which ideas of race and ethnicity are contested and reinforced; and oral history as a tool for documenting family memories of race and social difference. Assignments will encourage students to apply course theories and readings to their own family histories as a means of better understanding the history of race and difference in the United States.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

COMPLIT 183: Self-Impersonation: Fiction, Autobiography, Memoir (ENGLISH 183E)

Course will examine the intersecting genres of fiction, autobiography, and memoir. Topics will include the literary construction of selfhood and its constituent categories (gender, race, ethnicity, religion, etc.); the role of language in the development of the self; the relational nature of the self (vis-à-vis the family, "society," God); the cultural status of "individuality"; the concept of childhood; and the role of individual testimony in our understanding of family, religious and national history. In addition to short theoretical works, authors will include Knausgaard, Nabokov, Hoffman, Winterson, Said, Levi, Barthes, and Duras.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 32: Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective (ANTHRO 32)

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2018 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 45Q: Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society (SOC 45Q)

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Snipp, C. (PI)

CSRE 118S: Exploring Race and Ethnicity through Family History (AFRICAAM 118X, AMSTUD 118, ASNAMST 118S)

Who determines which narratives of race and difference are included in the national memory? In what ways does the family represent an archive for understanding race and social power in the United States? How does your own family history support or subvert dominant historical narratives of race and difference in the United States? Approaching race as an intersectional construct always defined by class, gender, and sexuality, this course examines family history as a site for understanding race, social power, and difference in American society. Topics to be discussed will include the family as an archive for understanding racial difference; family photo collections as sites through which ideas of race and ethnicity are contested and reinforced; and oral history as a tool for documenting family memories of race and social difference. Assignments will encourage students to apply course theories and readings to their own family histories as a means of better understanding the history of race and difference in the United States.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Gow, W. (PI)

CSRE 227: Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice

Juveniles are accorded special status under the American legal system. This introductory course will examine the historical precedents and philosophical reasons for treating juveniles differently from adults, and review empirical evidence about child development that can illuminate the reasons for their special status within the court system. Students will learn about the distribution of juvenile delinquency and the impact of significant social and institutional influences on delinquency: family, school, peers, and drugs. The course will also provide a detailed overview of the juvenile system, from its beginning to the current state of the institution, which will include a review of police work with juveniles, pretrial procedures, and the juvenile court and corrections systems. Major court rulings that have shaped contemporary juvenile justice will be presented. Finally, the course will consider dispositional options available to Courts, and will identify the most effective in reducing more »
Juveniles are accorded special status under the American legal system. This introductory course will examine the historical precedents and philosophical reasons for treating juveniles differently from adults, and review empirical evidence about child development that can illuminate the reasons for their special status within the court system. Students will learn about the distribution of juvenile delinquency and the impact of significant social and institutional influences on delinquency: family, school, peers, and drugs. The course will also provide a detailed overview of the juvenile system, from its beginning to the current state of the institution, which will include a review of police work with juveniles, pretrial procedures, and the juvenile court and corrections systems. Major court rulings that have shaped contemporary juvenile justice will be presented. Finally, the course will consider dispositional options available to Courts, and will identify the most effective in reducing delinquency. By the conclusion of this course, students should have an understanding of the juvenile justice system and how it compares with the adult justice system, what programs work to reduce recidivism, and be cognizant of some of the major legal and policy issues confronting that system today. The course format will combine lecture, group discussions, and guest presentations. Students may also have the opportunity to observe the juvenile justice system first hand by attending a juvenile court session, visiting a correctional facility for adjudicated delinquents, and hearing directly from those who work with high-risk youth on probation or in the community. Written Work. Each student will write four reflection papers, 5-7 pages each (about 1,700 words) over the quarter. Due dates will be listed in the class syllabus. Elements used in grading: Final grades will be based on the four reflection papers (20% each) and class participation (20%). This course is open to 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. Cross-listed with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity ( CSRE 227); open to Juniors and Seniors.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2015 | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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