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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 9 of 9 results for: stanford at sea

BIOHOPK 182H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIOHOPK 291H: Teaching of Stanford at Sea

Only open to graduate students who are teaching assistants for Stanford at Sea. Provides practical experience in teaching field oceanography and marine biology. Serving as an assistant in a lecture course (five weeks) is coupled with acting as a laboratory teaching assistant on board an oceanographic research vessel during a five-week research cruise with the Stanford at Sea course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Spring 2019

BIOHOPK 323H: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, EARTHSYS 323, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16

CHEM 31A: Chemical Principles I

31A is the first course in a two-quarter sequence designed to provide a robust foundation in key chemical principles for students with limited background in chemistry. The course engages students in group problem-solving activities throughout the class periods to deepen their ability to analyze and solve chemical problems. Students will also participate in weekly labs that will apply and expand upon class content. Due to social distancing guidelines, labs will be held over live Zoom. Students can opt-in to receive an at home lab kit that will allow them to conduct low-risk portions of the labs from their location. TAs will demonstrate and guide students through hands-on portions, as well as supplement with further in-depth video labs, virtual simulations, and problem solving practice. n31A will provide practice developing conceptual models that can explain qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of chemical phenomena and will be immediately applied to real world challenges. Stude more »
31A is the first course in a two-quarter sequence designed to provide a robust foundation in key chemical principles for students with limited background in chemistry. The course engages students in group problem-solving activities throughout the class periods to deepen their ability to analyze and solve chemical problems. Students will also participate in weekly labs that will apply and expand upon class content. Due to social distancing guidelines, labs will be held over live Zoom. Students can opt-in to receive an at home lab kit that will allow them to conduct low-risk portions of the labs from their location. TAs will demonstrate and guide students through hands-on portions, as well as supplement with further in-depth video labs, virtual simulations, and problem solving practice. n31A will provide practice developing conceptual models that can explain qualitatively and quantitatively a wide range of chemical phenomena and will be immediately applied to real world challenges. Students practice dimensional analysis, stoichiometry, and molecular naming that enables them to write chemical reactions, quantify reaction yield, and calculate empirical and molecular formulas. Using these skills, students estimate carbon efficiency of fossil fuels and identify unknowns in forensic analysis. Stoichiometry is reinforced through study of gases and their properties, through which students calculate the pressure exerted on a deep-sea diver. Students examine atomic and molecular structure by quantifying interactions among nuclei, electrons, atoms and molecules and explain trends in reactivity, such as why potassium metal catches fire in water. They explore how these interactions determine the structures and properties of pure substances, mixtures, proteins, and even DNA using three conceptual models for bonding: Lewis Dot, VSEPR, and Molecular Orbital Theory. They investigate the types and amounts of energy changes that accompany these interactions, phase changes, and chemical reactions, such as measuring the caloric content of food and dissecting an instant hand warmer. By the end of the course, students will be prepared to explore chemical reactivity in greater depth in 31B. nAll students who are interested in taking general chemistry at Stanford must take the Autumn 2020 General Chemistry Placement Test before Autumn quarter begins, regardless of chemistry background. Students with no AP/IB background are given enrollment priority in the 31A/B sequence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 323: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, BIOHOPK 323H, ESS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

ESS 323: Stanford at Sea (BIOHOPK 182H, BIOHOPK 323H, EARTHSYS 323)

(Graduate students register for 323H.) Five weeks of marine science including oceanography, marine physiology, policy, maritime studies, conservation, and nautical science at Hopkins Marine Station, followed by five weeks at sea aboard a sailing research vessel in the Pacific Ocean. Shore component comprised of three multidisciplinary courses meeting daily and continuing aboard ship. Students develop an independent research project plan while ashore, and carry out the research at sea. In collaboration with the Sea Education Association of Woods Hole, MA. Only 6 units may count towards the Biology major. 2020-21 academic year offering of this course is dependent on COVID-19 regulations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 16

GLOBAL 102: The Mamluks: Slave-Soldiers and Sultans of Medieval Egypt (GLOBAL 210, HISTORY 249, HISTORY 349A)

Known as ghulam or mamluk in Arabic, the slave-soldier was a ubiquitous phenomenon in the world of medieval Islam. Usually pagan steppe nomads, mamluks were purchased in adolescence, converted to Islam, taught Arabic, and trained to lead armies. Sometimes manumitted and sometimes not, in either case mamluks rose to positions of privilege and prominence in numerous regimes in the medieval Middle East.nnNowhere was the mamluk institution so fundamental as it was in Egypt between 1250 and 1517 CE, when Cairo was ruled by these slave-soldiers, their ranks constantly renewed by imports of new mamluks from the Black Sea and Caucuses. Born in the age of the crusades and ultimately conquered by the Ottoman Empire, the Mamluk Sultanate can be understood as a bridge between the worlds of medieval and early modern Islam, as well as between East and West, sitting astride the major Nile-Red Sea route that linked the Mediterranean world to that of the Indian Ocean and beyond. This class will investigate the rise and fall of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt and its key roles in the commercial, diplomatic, and political history both of the medieval Middle East and the wider world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

GLOBAL 210: The Mamluks: Slave-Soldiers and Sultans of Medieval Egypt (GLOBAL 102, HISTORY 249, HISTORY 349A)

Known as ghulam or mamluk in Arabic, the slave-soldier was a ubiquitous phenomenon in the world of medieval Islam. Usually pagan steppe nomads, mamluks were purchased in adolescence, converted to Islam, taught Arabic, and trained to lead armies. Sometimes manumitted and sometimes not, in either case mamluks rose to positions of privilege and prominence in numerous regimes in the medieval Middle East.nnNowhere was the mamluk institution so fundamental as it was in Egypt between 1250 and 1517 CE, when Cairo was ruled by these slave-soldiers, their ranks constantly renewed by imports of new mamluks from the Black Sea and Caucuses. Born in the age of the crusades and ultimately conquered by the Ottoman Empire, the Mamluk Sultanate can be understood as a bridge between the worlds of medieval and early modern Islam, as well as between East and West, sitting astride the major Nile-Red Sea route that linked the Mediterranean world to that of the Indian Ocean and beyond. This class will investigate the rise and fall of the Mamluk Sultanate in Egypt and its key roles in the commercial, diplomatic, and political history both of the medieval Middle East and the wider world.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Izzo, J. (PI)

OSPOXFRD 86: From the hills to the sea

This course would focus on the Thames River, at least since Roman times arguably the most important waterway in Britain. The basis of the class would be an exploration of the Thames from different angles both scientific and historical. The science side of the course would consider the following topics: the geology/geographic setting that gave rise to the Thames; its hydrology including a history of its floods and droughts as well as climate change trends; aspects of the hydrodynamics of tides and the estuarine environment of the Thames; the effects on the Thames of human modification such as loss of wetlands associated with building of the Docklands in the 18th and 19th centuries; sea level rise and the Thames including the design basis of the Thames Tidal Barrier. The history side of the course would consider how the Thames has played a role in the history of Britain, e.g., as an inland transportation corridor, as a barrier between states, as the site of the signing of the Magna Carta, as the heart of the global trade enterprise that built the British Empire, as a challenge to important engineering feats in Victorian London, as a subject for landscape painters like Turner, and as a spur of public policies of environmental protection and restoration.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5
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