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1 - 6 of 6 results for: rothe

EARTHSYS 119B: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align wit more »
Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

EARTHSYS 119C: Will Work for Food: Designing Your Pathway to Impact in the Food System

Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align wit more »
Offered exclusively for juniors and seniors, the goal of this course is to help you align your Stanford experience with potential pathways for creating impact in the food system after Stanford. This course builds on the "paced education" model that emerged from the d.school's landmark exploration of education at Stanford known as Stanford 2025. It is comprised of three phases of learning, which will unfold over six to nine months, at a pace that is determined by the amount of time you need to move from one phase to the next. In the first phase (119A and/or 119B) you will assess your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities and you will broadly explore a systemic problem of interest in the food system. In the second phase (119B), you will deepen your knowledge on a specific problem by creating a personal learning plan, a series of experiments to explore the ways in your knowledge, experience, abilities, interests, and development opportunities align with solving your problem of interest, and by developing a board of advisors to support you along the journey. In the third phase (119C), you will scope, in collaboration with a project partner, a project of real-world consequence. You must enroll in either 119A or 119B to enroll in 119C and the expectation is that you complete four units of work in total. This is a highly selective and hands-on course led by a teaching team with deep professional connections in the food system and who will act as your coaches, mentors, and connectors. Please visit http://feedcollaborative.org/classes/ to apply. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Select applicants will be interviewed. Decisions will be made one week prior to the start of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 187A: The Future of Food & Farming Technology

"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural system more »
"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural systems, where each student will step into the role of a modern, large scale farmer under simulated conditions. Through gamified scenarios based on real-world challenges faced by farmers, students will gain a deeper understanding of the problems facing our agriculture. Based on this nuanced understanding, students will propose new and novel uses of existing and/or emerging technologies to solve these problems. These ideas will be circulated in the marketplace of your peer farmers, where ideas will either be adopted, modified and built upon, or abandoned. This process will tap into, challenge, and hone your creative problem solving abilities. In the end, we will see who has what it takes to fundamentally shift the course of our food system,nnThis class is for students who are (a) aspiring ag-tech entrepreneurs (b) generally interested in emerging technologies or (c) seeking a deeper understanding of how large scale agriculture works.nnThe application for this course can be found on the d.school¿s website: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/nnCourse meets : Saturday May 4th, 10 am to 3pm, Saturday May 11th, 10am to 3pm, Saturday May 25th, 10am to 3pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Rothe, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 250: Directed Research

Independent research. Student develops own project with faculty supervision. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Benson, S. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boggs, C. (PI) ; Boucher, A. (PI) ; Cain, B. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Carlisle, L. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Curran, L. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Egger, A. (PI) ; Ehrlich, P. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hayden, T. (PI) ; Hilley, G. (PI) ; Ingle, J. (PI) ; Jamieson, A. (PI) ; Jones, J. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knight, R. (PI) ; Konings, A. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Litvak, L. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Lynham, J. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Milroy, C. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Nevle, R. (PI) ; Orr, F. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Payne, J. (PI) ; Peay, K. (PI) ; Phillips, K. (PI) ; Rajaratnam, B. (PI) ; Root, T. (PI) ; Rothe, M. (PI) ; Schneider, S. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Seto, K. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Somero, G. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Switzer, P. (PI) ; Tabazadeh, A. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Victor, D. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Watanabe, J. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; Wiederkehr, S. (PI) ; Wilber, C. (PI) ; Woodward, J. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)

EARTHSYS 289: FEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation

Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 297: Directed Individual Study in Earth Systems

Under supervision of an Earth Systems faculty member on a subject of mutual interest.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-9 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Anderson, M. (PI) ; Archie, P. (PI) ; Ardoin, N. (PI) ; Arrigo, K. (PI) ; Asner, G. (PI) ; Banerjee, B. (PI) ; Barry, M. (PI) ; Block, B. (PI) ; Boggs, C. (PI) ; Boucher, A. (PI) ; Cain, B. (PI) ; Caldeira, K. (PI) ; Caldwell, M. (PI) ; Carlisle, L. (PI) ; Casciotti, K. (PI) ; Chamberlain, P. (PI) ; Curran, L. (PI) ; Daily, G. (PI) ; Davis, J. (PI) ; Denny, M. (PI) ; Diffenbaugh, N. (PI) ; Dirzo, R. (PI) ; Dunbar, R. (PI) ; Durham, W. (PI) ; Egger, A. (PI) ; Ernst, W. (PI) ; Falcon, W. (PI) ; Fendorf, S. (PI) ; Field, C. (PI) ; Francis, C. (PI) ; Frank, Z. (PI) ; Freyberg, D. (PI) ; Fukami, T. (PI) ; Gardner, C. (PI) ; Gerritsen, M. (PI) ; Gilly, W. (PI) ; Gordon, D. (PI) ; Gorelick, S. (PI) ; Goulder, L. (PI) ; Hadly, E. (PI) ; Hawk, S. (PI) ; Hayden, T. (PI) ; Hecker, S. (PI) ; Hilley, G. (PI) ; Hoagland, S. (PI) ; Ihme, M. (PI) ; Ingle, J. (PI) ; Jackson, R. (PI) ; Jacobson, M. (PI) ; Jamieson, A. (PI) ; Jones, J. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, D. (PI) ; Kennedy, J. (PI) ; Knight, R. (PI) ; Koseff, J. (PI) ; Kovscek, A. (PI) ; Lambin, E. (PI) ; Lawrence, K. (PI) ; Litvak, L. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Long, S. (PI) ; Lutomski, P. (PI) ; Lynham, J. (PI) ; Lyons, E. (PI) ; Masters, G. (PI) ; Matson, P. (PI) ; Micheli, F. (PI) ; Monismith, S. (PI) ; Mooney, H. (PI) ; Mormann, F. (PI) ; Naylor, R. (PI) ; Nelson, J. (PI) ; Nevle, R. (PI) ; Novy-Hildesley, J. (PI) ; Orr, F. (PI) ; Ortolano, L. (PI) ; Osborne, M. (PI) ; Palumbi, S. (PI) ; Payne, J. (PI) ; Phillips, K. (PI) ; Polk, E. (PI) ; Rajaratnam, B. (PI) ; Root, T. (PI) ; Rothe, M. (PI) ; Saltzman, J. (PI) ; Schneider, S. (PI) ; Schoolnik, G. (PI) ; Seto, K. (PI) ; Shiv, B. (PI) ; Siegel, R. (PI) ; Simon, G. (PI) ; Somero, G. (PI) ; Sweeney, J. (PI) ; Switzer, P. (PI) ; Tabazadeh, A. (PI) ; Thomas, L. (PI) ; Thompson, B. (PI) ; Truebe, S. (PI) ; Victor, D. (PI) ; Vitousek, P. (PI) ; Walbot, V. (PI) ; Watanabe, J. (PI) ; Weyant, J. (PI) ; Wiederkehr, S. (PI) ; Wight, G. (PI) ; Wolak, F. (PI) ; Woodward, J. (PI) ; Zoback, M. (PI)
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