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1 - 10 of 474 results for: pwr

AFRICAAM 194: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures (PWR 194AJ)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. This course will examine Black engagements with digital culture as sites for community building, social action and individual and collective identity formation. By studying phenomena like #BlackTwitter, memes, Vine, selfie culture, blogging, "social watching," and more, we will explore how Black technology use addresses questions like identity performance and expression, hyper visibility and invisibility of Black lives, Black feminisms, misogynoir and Black women/femme leadership in social movements, the roles and influence of Black Queer cultures online, and social activism and movements in online spaces. nnFrom #YouOKSis, #BlackLivesMatter and #AfroLatinidad to the Clapback, roasts and "reads," we will work from the serious to the silly, from individuals to collectives, from activism to everyday life, and from distinct Black cultures to diasporic connections and exchange. Participants in the course will create a social media autobiography, a "read/ing" of a Black cultural practice or phenomenon online, host an online discussion, and prepare a pitch for a longer research project they might pursue as a thesis or an ongoing study. Bring your GIFs, memes, and emoji, and a willingness to be in community both online and off for this new course! Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 144: Design and Innovation for the Circular Economy

The last 150 years of our industrial evolution have been material and energy intensive. The linear model of production and consumption manufactures goods from raw materials, wells and uses them, and then discards the products as waste. Circular economy provides a framework for systems-level redesign. It builds on schools of thought including regenerative design, performance economy industrial ecology, blue economy, biomimicry, and cradle to cradle. This course introduces the concepts of the circular economy and applies them to case studies of consumer products, household goods, and fixed assets.n nStudents will conduct independent projects on circular economy. Students may work alone or in small teams under the guidance of the teaching team and various collaborators worldwide. Class is limited to 14 students. All disciplines are welcome. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 94: Topics in Writing and Rhetoric: Empathy, Ethics, and Compassion Meditation (PWR 194DH)

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. In this course, we'll extend this discussion by expanding our thinking about rhetoric as a means of persuasion to consider its relation to empathy-as a mode of listening to and understanding audiences and communities we identify with as well as those whose beliefs and actions can be lethal. We'll also practice compassion medication and empathetic rhetoric to see how these ethical stances affect us individually and investigate the ways they may and may not be scaled to address social justice more broadly. Finally, with the course readings and discussions in mind, you will explore a social justice issue and create an essay, a workshop, campaign or movement strategy, podcast, vlog, infographic, Facebook group, syllabus, etc. to help move us closer to positive change. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Autumn 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 194KT: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Last Hopi On Earth: The Rhetoric of Entertainment Inequity (PWR 194KT)

While #OscarsSoWhite brought attention to the Academy's overwhelmingly White, male membership, the underbelly of the entertainment industry itself is rife with inequitable hiring of not only on-camera and on-stage performers but also directors, writers, and others behind the scenes. While there are several organizations from Racebending.com to the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media that seek to usher in more equitable representation, push back against the Industry's disparate employment practices has been documented for more than fifty years with what many argue is not proportionally positive movement. White males still garner almost half of all theatrical and television roles and represent more than 80% of episodic directors while entertainment hubs Los Angeles and New York City are more than 50% people of color and female. What will it take to attain equity in the entertainment industry? Why does it matter? nnIn this course, students will examine rhetorical issues in promoting, defending, and opposing entertainment industry practices - writing and speaking across genres in persuasive response - and ultimately develop a collaborative 5-year strategic plan to usher in equity.n nThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For video course description, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/last-hopi-earth-rhetoric-entertainment-inequity.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 194SS: Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Making Rhetoric Matter: Human Rights at Home (PWR 194SS)

'Human rights' often sounds like it needs defending in far-off places: in distant public squares where soldiers menace gatherings of citizens, in dark jails where prisoners are tortured for their politics, in unknown streets where gender inequality has brutal consequences. But Bryan Stevenson, a lawyer fighting for social and racial justice in the jails of Alabama, proposes that we try 'proximity': that we get close to the injustices that are already close to us. This class thus takes human rights as a local issue, focusing on how terms like 'human' and 'rights' are interpreted on our campus and in our neighborhoods, cities, and region. Instead of a traditional human rights policy framework, we'll use the lens of intersectional ethics to explore specific rhetorical issues in gender politics, citizenship, higher education, police brutality, and mass incarceration. We will write, speak, and move across genres, responding to the work of incarcerated artists, creating embodied workshops, 'translating' ideas into new media (does someone you know need an animated video about gender pronouns? Or maybe it's time for a podcast about #PrisonRenaissance?), doing collaborative research, and 'writing back' to our audiences. For course video and full description see: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-courses/making-rhetoric-matter-human-rights-home.nnThis course is part of the PWR advanced elective track in Social and Racial Justice (SRJ). Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EARTHSYS 154: Intermediate Writing: Communicating Climate Change: Navigating the Stories from the Frontlines (PWR 91EP)

In the next two decades floods, droughts and famine caused by climate change will displace more than 250 million people around the world. In this course students will develop an increased understanding of how different stakeholders including scientists, aid organizations, locals, policy makers, activists, and media professionals communicate the climate change crisis. They will select a site experiencing the devastating effects and research the voices telling the stories of those sites and the audiences who are (or are not) listening. Students might want to investigate drought-ridden areas such as the Central Valley of California or Darfur, Sudan; Alpine glaciers melting in the Alps or in Alaska; the increasingly flooded Pacific islands; the hurricane ravaged Gulf Coast, among many others. Data from various stakeholders will be analyzed and synthesized for a magazine length article designed to bring attention to a region and/or issue that has previously been neglected. Students will write and submit their article for publication.nnFor students who have completed the first two levels of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first two levels of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/explore/notation-science-writing.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2016 | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENGLISH 90: Fiction Writing

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENGLISH 92: Reading and Writing Poetry

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.nNOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 86Q: Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism (JEWISHST 86Q)

Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

JEWISHST 86Q: Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism (HISTORY 86Q)

For over two millennia, Jews and Judaism have been the object of sustained anxieties, fears, and fantasies, which have in turn underpinned repeated outbreaks of violence and persecution. This course will explore the development and impact of antisemitism from Late Antiquity to the Enlightenment, including the emergence of the Blood libel, the association between Jews and moneylending, and the place of Judaism in Christian and Islamic theology. No prior background in history or Jewish studies is necessary. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI, Writing 2 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)
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