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1 - 9 of 9 results for: psych 60

PSYCH 60: Introduction to Developmental Psychology

Psychological development from birth to adulthood, emphasizing infancy and the early and middle childhood years. The nature of change during childhood and theories of development. Recommended: PSYCH 1.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 60A: Introduction to Developmental Psychology Section

Guided observation of children age 2-5 at Bing Nursery School. Corequisite: 60.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 2

PSYCH 141: Cognitive Development

How do humans think, learn, and communicate? What are the developmental roots of these capacities, and what makes young children such remarkable learners? This course aims to offer an understanding of how human cognition - the ability to think, reason, and learn about the world - changes in the first few years of life. We will review and evaluate both classic findings and state-of-the-art research on cognitive development and understand the logic behind the scientific methods for studying cognition in young children. By the end of the course, students will gain a deeper understanding of the major theoretical accounts of intellectual growth as well as the key empirical findings that support (or refute) these accounts, understand the basic logic of scientific methods in cognitive development research, and be able to discuss implications of cognitive development research on real-world issues in education and social policy. PSYCH141 is an Area A course for 2019-2020. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1. Recommended: PSYCH 60
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

PSYCH 175: Social Cognition and Learning in Early Childhood

Social cognition - the ability to recognize others, understand their behaviors, and reason about their thoughts - is a critical component of what makes us human. What are the basic elements of social cognition, and what do children understand about other people's actions, thoughts, and feelings? How do these capacities help us understand the world, as learning unfolds in the first few years of life? This course will take a deeper look at the intersection of social cognition and cognitive development to better understand how children learn about the world.nnStudents will explore various topics on social cognition with an emphasis on (but not limited to) developmental perspectives, including face perception, action understanding, Theory of Mind, communication, and altruism, and think about how these abilities might be linked to the developmental changes in children's understanding of the world. The course will encourage students to think hard about the fundamental questions about the hum more »
Social cognition - the ability to recognize others, understand their behaviors, and reason about their thoughts - is a critical component of what makes us human. What are the basic elements of social cognition, and what do children understand about other people's actions, thoughts, and feelings? How do these capacities help us understand the world, as learning unfolds in the first few years of life? This course will take a deeper look at the intersection of social cognition and cognitive development to better understand how children learn about the world.nnStudents will explore various topics on social cognition with an emphasis on (but not limited to) developmental perspectives, including face perception, action understanding, Theory of Mind, communication, and altruism, and think about how these abilities might be linked to the developmental changes in children's understanding of the world. The course will encourage students to think hard about the fundamental questions about the human mind and how it interacts with other minds, and the value of studying young children in addressing these questions. Students should expect to read, present, and discuss theoretical and empirical research articles and to develop original research proposals as a final project. nnStudents will have an opportunity to develop their proposals into a research project in PSYCH 187, a lab course offered every other year in Spring (next offer expected to be Spring 2018) as a sequel to this course. This course fulfills the WIM requirement. nnPrerequisites Psych 60 or Psych141, or see instructor
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

PSYCH 176: Biology, Culture and Family in Early Development

Early childhood is a time of both enormous promise and vulnerability. Parents differ widely in their practices and beliefs about their role in enabling children to avoid risk and to achieve their potential for a healthy and productive life in the particular physical, social and cultural contexts of the communities and societies in which they live. In this seminar we will evaluate evidence from the biological and social sciences showing how experiences in infancy have profound and enduring effects on early brain architecture, with consequences for later language, cognitive, and socio- emotional development in childhood and adulthood. We will also consider the challenges of designing more effective social policies and programs to provide support for families in diverse socioeconomic and cultural contexts, who all want to help their children thrive. A community-service learning option, working with children as a reading tutor, is included for students taking this class for 4-units. Enrollment is limited and consent of instructor is required. Please send a brief statement of your interests, goals, and academic preparation relevant to the themes of this class to Prof. Fernald (afernald@stanford.edu). Pre-requisites: Psych 01 and Psych 60, or Human Biology 3B.
Last offered: Winter 2018

PSYCH 178: New Methods for Old Questions: Linking Social Cognition and Social Cognitive Neuroscience

Novel technology can fuel new discoveries and generate new questions for future research. For instance, looking-time methods for studying infants or response time (RT) measures in cognitive psychology have been enabled by the use of computers and video cameras. More recently, neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI) have transformed the field by offering a more direct look into the working human brain. These methods are, in a way, 'old' and 'new' ways of studying what psychologists want to study - mental representations. nnWhat are the promises and challenges of using these methods to study human cognition and its development? What have we learned, where have we fallen short, and why? Most importantly, how can we make the most out of these new methods to bear on our understanding of social cognition and its development? After the first two weeks of lectures on basic methods, each week we will consider a topic that has been extensively studied in cognitive development literature. Topics w more »
Novel technology can fuel new discoveries and generate new questions for future research. For instance, looking-time methods for studying infants or response time (RT) measures in cognitive psychology have been enabled by the use of computers and video cameras. More recently, neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI) have transformed the field by offering a more direct look into the working human brain. These methods are, in a way, 'old' and 'new' ways of studying what psychologists want to study - mental representations. nnWhat are the promises and challenges of using these methods to study human cognition and its development? What have we learned, where have we fallen short, and why? Most importantly, how can we make the most out of these new methods to bear on our understanding of social cognition and its development? After the first two weeks of lectures on basic methods, each week we will consider a topic that has been extensively studied in cognitive development literature. Topics will include: perception of agency, theory of mind, and morality; on each topic, we will compare two different ways of studying mental representations - the 'old' way (behavior) and the 'new' way (neural response) - to assess their relative benefits and shortcomings, and to discuss the promises and pitfalls for combining the two.nnThis course will be a combination of lectures, presentations, and discussions aimed primarily for upper-class undergraduate students or graduate students who do not have much background in neuroimaging methods, but interested in learning more about neuroimaging methods and think about how these methods can (and cannot) help address questions about social cognition and development. Prerequisite: Psych 60 or Psych141, or see instructor
Last offered: Autumn 2015

PSYCH 251: Experimental Methods (SYMSYS 195E)

Graduate laboratory class in experimental methods for psychology, with a focus on open science methods and best practices in behavioral research. Topics include experimental design, data collection, data management, data analysis, and the ethical conduct of research. The final project of the course is a replication experiment in which students collect new data following the procedures of a published paper. The course is designed for incoming graduate students in psychology, but is open to qualified students from other programs who have some working knowledge of the R statistical programming language. Requirement: Psych 10/ Stats 60 or equivalent
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

PSYCH 252: Statistical Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences

This course offers an introduction to advanced topics in statistics with the focus of understanding data in the behavioral and social sciences. It is a practical course in which learning statistical concepts and building models in R go hand in hand. The course is organized into three parts: In the first part, we will learn how to visualize, wrangle, and simulate data in R. In the second part, we will cover topics in frequentist statistics (such as multiple regression, logistic regression, and mixed effects models) using the general linear model as an organizing framework. We will learn how to compare models using simulation methods such as bootstrapping and cross-validation. In the third part, we will focus on Bayesian data analysis as an alternative framework for answering statistical questions. Please view course website: https:// psych252.github.io/. Open to graduate students only. Requirement: Psych 10/ Stats 60 or equivalent
Terms: Win | Units: 5

SYMSYS 195E: Experimental Methods (PSYCH 251)

Graduate laboratory class in experimental methods for psychology, with a focus on open science methods and best practices in behavioral research. Topics include experimental design, data collection, data management, data analysis, and the ethical conduct of research. The final project of the course is a replication experiment in which students collect new data following the procedures of a published paper. The course is designed for incoming graduate students in psychology, but is open to qualified students from other programs who have some working knowledge of the R statistical programming language. Requirement: Psych 10/ Stats 60 or equivalent
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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