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1 - 10 of 10 results for: play and games educ

BIOE 196: INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAMES (BIOPHYS 196, CS 544)

Interactive media and games increasingly pervade and shape our society. In addition to their dominant roles in entertainment, video games play growing roles in education, arts, and science. This seminar series brings together a diverse set of experts to provide interdisciplinary perspectives on these media regarding their history, technologies, scholarly research, industry, artistic value, and potential future.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

BIOPHYS 196: INTERACTIVE MEDIA AND GAMES (BIOE 196, CS 544)

Interactive media and games increasingly pervade and shape our society. In addition to their dominant roles in entertainment, video games play growing roles in education, arts, and science. This seminar series brings together a diverse set of experts to provide interdisciplinary perspectives on these media regarding their history, technologies, scholarly research, industry, artistic value, and potential future.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

CS 227B: General Game Playing

A general game playing system accepts a formal description of a game to play it without human intervention or algorithms designed for specific games. Hands-on introduction to these systems and artificial intelligence techniques such as knowledge representation, reasoning, learning, and rational behavior. Students create GGP systems to compete with each other and in external competitions. Prerequisite: programming experience. Recommended: 103 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

ECON 162: Games Developing Nations Play (POLISCI 247A, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weingast, B. (PI)

EDUC 414: Play and Games (SOC 301)

Social life would be unimaginable without play and games. Students will be introduced to social theories of play and games; the history of games and their variation; readings concerned with how play and games affect interaction and socialization; how race and gender are enacted in and through play and games; how play and games relate to creativity and innovation; and how games can be designed for engrossment and the accomplishment of various tasks and learning goals. Course intended mainly for doctoral students, though master¿s and undergraduate students are welcome. This is a new course, so please expect collaboration with instructor and other students to shape the course content.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

GERLANG 20R: German Conversation through Drama

Want to practice your German by playing improvisation games, reading dialogues and performing short scenes? In this German conversation course, for students anywhere from intermediate to advanced, we'll read scenes from Friedrich Dürrenmatt's Die Physiker, a hilarious dark comedy from the 1960's about three "scientists" in an insane asylum who want to save the world from the nuclear danger of scientific progress. We'll work through the play, discussing the broader issues and performing for each other different interpretations of important scenes. This is a great way to practice reading and speaking in German, learn new vocab, and play around with a fascinating, cold-war era text that has a lot to say about scientific ethics today.
Last offered: Spring 2016

OB 115N: Games, Decisions and Negotiations

Human thinking is geared toward understanding and mastering social interactions. OB 115N explores cognitive, affective, behavioral, social and organizational processes that shape how we manage strategic interactions. The course builds on concepts and research findings from decision theory, behavioral game theory, negotiation research, and other relevant streams of investigation in the social sciences. By the end of this course, participants should have a better understanding of the structural and psychological factors that underlie competition and cooperation, bargaining, contracting, social influence, dispute resolution, and other types of social and organizational interactions. In addition to understanding how to analyze human thinking, feeling, and action in interactive contexts, participants will have opportunities to develop their behavioral skills through in-class exercises and simulations. Participants will play assigned roles in simulated interactions that will allow them to t more »
Human thinking is geared toward understanding and mastering social interactions. OB 115N explores cognitive, affective, behavioral, social and organizational processes that shape how we manage strategic interactions. The course builds on concepts and research findings from decision theory, behavioral game theory, negotiation research, and other relevant streams of investigation in the social sciences. By the end of this course, participants should have a better understanding of the structural and psychological factors that underlie competition and cooperation, bargaining, contracting, social influence, dispute resolution, and other types of social and organizational interactions. In addition to understanding how to analyze human thinking, feeling, and action in interactive contexts, participants will have opportunities to develop their behavioral skills through in-class exercises and simulations. Participants will play assigned roles in simulated interactions that will allow them to try out tactics that might feel uncomfortable trying in actual situations, get constructive feedback from other participants, and learn how they come across. The course readings, which are aimed to complement the in-class exercises, debriefs, and discussions, are aimed to further stimulate participants' interest in human cognition, emotion, and behavior in interactive contexts.To understand how decisions happen, we will use a combination of experiential exercises in class and in-depth discussions of theory and new and exciting research findings on cognitive and emotional aspects of decision making (e.g., what does "bounded-rationality" mean? how does power shape our negotiation behavior? how do our emotions influence our decisions?). We will play interactive games in our meetings to understand how various conditions, such as time pressure, power and uncertainty, influence our decisions. So, if you enjoy in-class exercises, you will enjoy our simulations. At the same time, if you enjoy analyzing human behavior and social interactions, you will like the readings and our discussions. After taking this course, you will be better able to identify and avoid common traps in strategic decision making and have a deeper understanding of other people's thinking and decision making processes.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

POLISCI 247A: Games Developing Nations Play (ECON 162, POLISCI 347A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SI
Instructors: Weingast, B. (PI)

POLISCI 347A: Games Developing Nations Play (ECON 162, POLISCI 247A)

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Weingast, B. (PI)

TAPS 124D: Acting for Non-Majors

Formerly TAPS 20. Creative play, ensemble work in a supportive environment. Designed for the student to experience a range of new creative skills, from group improvisation to partner work. Introductory work on freeing the natural voice and physical relaxation. Emphasis on rediscovering imaginative and creative impulses. Movement improvisation, listening exercises, and theater games release the energy, playfulness and willingness to take risks that is the essence of free and powerful performance. Course culminates with work on dramatic text.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce
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