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1 - 10 of 28 results for: musical theater

DANCE 102: Musical Theater Dance Styles (MUSIC 184E)

Students will be able to demonstrate period specificity, character of style through learning different musical theater dances from the early 20th C.to the present. ALL students will participate in an end of quarter showing of the choreography developed and composed in class. Class will be supplemented with the occasional guest, DJ accompaniment and video viewing.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, way_ce | Repeatable for credit

DANCE 114: Movement for Actors/Acting for Dancers: Techniques for the Contemporary Performer

Designed for the performing artist in the contemporary theatrical environment, this class will expose students to various training modalities from contemporary dance, popular dance styles, physical theater, musical theater, Greek theater and other somatic techniques. Students will undertake various practices such as, but not limited to: Viewpoints, Laban, Gaga, Butoh and Grotowski in a workshop format. Other activities include creating studies from widely sourced prompts as given by the instructor and developing a personal performance preparation playbook. The course will include special guests from the TAPS faculty in Dance, Theater and Performance. In an age where the triple threat performer is in high demand, and movement, text, narrative, production and space are not necessarily treated hierarchically, the well-rounded performer will be better equipped to handle current multi-genre stages. While all levels are welcomed, the committed dance and/or theater student is especially encouraged to apply. Questions? Contact: Aleta Hayes (ahayes1@stanford.edu)
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: way_ce

FEMGEN 98: Queer Music

This course explores the cultural and historical overlap of two marginal categories - the queer, the musical - with a focus on what these critical concepts can teach us much about identity, identification, and belonging. We will discuss genres including classical, musical theater, rap, pop, country, and punk as well as queer socialities formed in and through these musical scenes. We will think critically about the subtleties of musical language and queer affect, the circulation of gay rumors, and the diva as an object of queer obsession while asking how race, gender, and class as well as elitism, status, and taste inform such inquiries.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Crandall, M. (PI)

FILMEDIA 137: Love in the Time of Cinema (FILMEDIA 337, GLOBAL 110, GLOBAL 211)

Romantic coupling is at the heart of mainstream film narratives around the world. Through a range of film cultures, we will examine cinematic intimacies and our own mediated understandings of love and conjugality formed in dialog with film and other media. We will consider genres, infrastructures, social activities (for example, the drive-in theater, the movie date, the Bollywood wedding musical, 90s queer cinema), and examine film romance in relation to queerness, migration, old age, disability, and body politics more broadly.
| UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FILMEDIA 337: Love in the Time of Cinema (FILMEDIA 137, GLOBAL 110, GLOBAL 211)

Romantic coupling is at the heart of mainstream film narratives around the world. Through a range of film cultures, we will examine cinematic intimacies and our own mediated understandings of love and conjugality formed in dialog with film and other media. We will consider genres, infrastructures, social activities (for example, the drive-in theater, the movie date, the Bollywood wedding musical, 90s queer cinema), and examine film romance in relation to queerness, migration, old age, disability, and body politics more broadly.

GLOBAL 110: Love in the Time of Cinema (FILMEDIA 137, FILMEDIA 337, GLOBAL 211)

Romantic coupling is at the heart of mainstream film narratives around the world. Through a range of film cultures, we will examine cinematic intimacies and our own mediated understandings of love and conjugality formed in dialog with film and other media. We will consider genres, infrastructures, social activities (for example, the drive-in theater, the movie date, the Bollywood wedding musical, 90s queer cinema), and examine film romance in relation to queerness, migration, old age, disability, and body politics more broadly.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

GLOBAL 211: Love in the Time of Cinema (FILMEDIA 137, FILMEDIA 337, GLOBAL 110)

Romantic coupling is at the heart of mainstream film narratives around the world. Through a range of film cultures, we will examine cinematic intimacies and our own mediated understandings of love and conjugality formed in dialog with film and other media. We will consider genres, infrastructures, social activities (for example, the drive-in theater, the movie date, the Bollywood wedding musical, 90s queer cinema), and examine film romance in relation to queerness, migration, old age, disability, and body politics more broadly.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

MUSIC 34N: Performing America: The Broadway Musical

Musical theater and the representation of American identities in the twentieth century to the present. Issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality; intersections with jazz, rock, and pop; roles of lyricist, composer, director, choreographer, producer, performers. Individual shows (Showboat, Oklahoma, West Side Story, Company, Les Mis¿rables, Into the Woods, Wicked, Hamilton, Dear Evan Hansen, Heathers); musical theater "song types" across eras; show tunes in popular culture at large; musicals on film, television, and social media. Opportunities for performance and attending local productions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Grey, T. (PI)

MUSIC 183C: Interpretation of Musical Theater Repertoire (TAPS 183C)

By audition only: Contact instructor prior to enrolling (mlcats@stanford.edu). Ability to read music expected, but students with experience singing in musical theater can be accepted. For singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting along with lecture/discussion of important eras of musical theater history. Composers include Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers, Sondheim, Lloyd Weber, Jason Robert Brown and others. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists).
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)
Instructors: Catsalis, M. (PI)

MUSIC 183CZ: Interpretation of Musical Theater Repertoire

By audition only: Contact instructor prior to enrolling (mlcats@stanford.edu). Ability to read music expected, but students with experience singing in musical theater can be accepted. For singers and pianists as partners. Performance class in a workshop setting along with lecture/discussion of important eras of musical theater history. Composers include Kern, Porter, Gershwin, Rodgers, Sondheim, Lloyd Weber, Jason Robert Brown and others. May be repeated for credit a total of 2 times. Enrollment limit: 20 (ten singers maximum). Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Recommended prerequisite: 170 (pianists).
Terms: Win | Units: 0 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 0 units total)
Instructors: Catsalis, M. (PI)
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