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1 - 10 of 59 results for: museums

AFRICAST 127: African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present (ARTHIST 127A)

This course explores the relationship between art and politics in twentieth century Africa. Artistic production and consumption is considered in the context of various major political shifts, from the experience of colonialism to the struggle against Apartheid. Each week we will look closely at different works of art and examine how artists and designers responded to such challenges as independence, modernization and globalization. We will look at painting, sculpture, religious art, public and performance art, photography and film. How western perceptions and understanding of African art have shifted, and how museums have framed African art throughout the twentieth century will remain important points of discussion throughout the course.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

AMSTUD 226X: Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums (CSRE 226X, EDUC 226)

In an age when some 50% of museum visitors only "visit" museums online and when digital technologies have broken open archival access, anyone can be a curator, a critic, an historian, an archivist. In this context, how do museums create experiences that teach visitors about who they are and about the world around them? What are the politics of representation that shape learning in these environments? Using an experimental instructional approach, students will reconsider and redefine what it means to curate experience. (This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.)
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ANTHRO 123A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 223A, ARCHLGY 123A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ANTHRO 223A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 123A, ARCHLGY 123A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 97: Archaeology Internship

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-10 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 106A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 306A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 123A: Debating Repatriation (ANTHRO 123A, ANTHRO 223A)

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2017 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ARCHLGY 134: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 234: Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present (ARCHLGY 134, ARTHIST 284B)

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Hodge, C. (PI)

ARCHLGY 306A: Museums and Collections (ARCHLGY 106A)

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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