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1 - 10 of 13 results for: mabuchi

APPPHYS 189: Physical Analysis of Artworks (ARCHLGY 189)

Students explore the use of Stanford Nano Shared Facilities (SNSF) for physical analysis of material samples of interest for art conservation, technical art history and archaeology. Weekly SNSF demonstrations will be supplemented by lectures on intellectual context by Stanford faculty/staff and conservators from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco (FAMSF). Students will undertake analysis projects derived from ongoing conservation efforts at FAMSF, including training on the use of relevant SNSF instruments and data analysis.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Mabuchi, H. (PI)

APPPHYS 290: Directed Studies in Applied Physics

Special studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May include lab work or directed reading.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Allen, S. (PI) ; Baccus, S. (PI) ; Baer, T. (PI) ; Beasley, M. (PI) ; Bienenstock, A. (PI) ; Block, S. (PI) ; Boneh, D. (PI) ; Brongersma, M. (PI) ; Bucksbaum, P. (PI) ; Byer, R. (PI) ; Chu, S. (PI) ; Clark, S. (PI) ; Clemens, B. (PI) ; Das, R. (PI) ; Devereaux, T. (PI) ; Digonnet, M. (PI) ; Dionne, J. (PI) ; Doniach, S. (PI) ; Dresselhaus-Marais, L. (PI) ; Druckmann, S. (PI) ; Dunne, M. (PI) ; El Gamal, A. (PI) ; Fan, S. (PI) ; Fejer, M. (PI) ; Feldman, B. (PI) ; Fetter, A. (PI) ; Fisher, D. (PI) ; Fisher, I. (PI) ; Fox, J. (PI) ; Ganguli, S. (PI) ; Geballe, T. (PI) ; Glenzer, S. (PI) ; Goldhaber-Gordon, D. (PI) ; Good, B. (PI) ; Haroush, K. (PI) ; Harris, J. (PI) ; Harrison, W. (PI) ; Heinz, T. (PI) ; Hesselink, L. (PI) ; Hogan, D. (PI) ; Hogan, J. (PI) ; Hollberg, L. (PI) ; Hong, G. (PI) ; Huang, Z. (PI) ; Hwang, H. (PI) ; Jackson, R. (PI) ; Kachru, S. (PI) ; Kapitulnik, A. (PI) ; Kasevich, M. (PI) ; Kenny, T. (PI) ; Khemani, V. (PI) ; Khuri-Yakub, B. (PI) ; Kuo, C. (PI) ; Lee, Y. (PI) ; Lev, B. (PI) ; Levin, C. (PI) ; Lindenberg, A. (PI) ; Linderman, S. (PI) ; Lobell, D. (PI) ; Mabuchi, H. (PI) ; Manoharan, H. (PI) ; Marinelli, A. (PI) ; Miller, D. (PI) ; Moerner, W. (PI) ; Moler, K. (PI) ; Nanni, E. (PI) ; Nilsson, A. (PI) ; Osheroff, D. (PI) ; Palanker, D. (PI) ; Pease, R. (PI) ; Petrosian, V. (PI) ; Prakash, M. (PI) ; Quake, S. (PI) ; Quate, C. (PI) ; Raghu, S. (PI) ; Raubenheimer, T. (PI) ; Reed, E. (PI) ; Reis, D. (PI) ; Safavi-Naeini, A. (PI) ; Schnitzer, M. (PI) ; Shen, Z. (PI) ; Solgaard, O. (PI) ; Spakowitz, A. (PI) ; Stohr, J. (PI) ; Sturrock, P. (PI) ; Su, D. (PI) ; Suzuki, Y. (PI) ; Tantawi, S. (PI) ; Vuckovic, J. (PI) ; Wang, B. (PI) ; Winick, H. (PI) ; Yamamoto, Y. (PI) ; Zhang, S. (PI)

APPPHYS 291: Practical Training

Opportunity for practical training in industrial labs. Arranged by student with research adviser's approval. Summary of activities required.
Terms: Aut, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit

APPPHYS 390: Dissertation Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

APPPHYS 802: TGR PhD Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit

JAPAN 126: Japanese Functional Objects (JAPAN 226)

This course focuses on the creation of objects at the boundary between the aesthetic allure of fine art and the utilitarian practicality of everyday life. It is also about how we value the objects with which we surround ourselves, connected to issues that go from sustainability to the intimacy of the handmade - of the little but precise tool marks that evoke the skilled expertise of years spent at the workbench.n nTraditionally in Japan the distinction between a work of art and a utilitarian object was inessential. An aesthetic object acquired its cultural identity and social value precisely because it could be used. Famous examples of this duality can be found in tea ceremony ceramics, complex architectural joinery, lavish fabric design, and fine temple-inspired cuisine. This is true even for painting and calligraphy: illustrated paper-covered architectural partitions were as useful in keeping a room warm as in serving as the highlight of a social gathering; hanging scrolls and flower more »
This course focuses on the creation of objects at the boundary between the aesthetic allure of fine art and the utilitarian practicality of everyday life. It is also about how we value the objects with which we surround ourselves, connected to issues that go from sustainability to the intimacy of the handmade - of the little but precise tool marks that evoke the skilled expertise of years spent at the workbench.n nTraditionally in Japan the distinction between a work of art and a utilitarian object was inessential. An aesthetic object acquired its cultural identity and social value precisely because it could be used. Famous examples of this duality can be found in tea ceremony ceramics, complex architectural joinery, lavish fabric design, and fine temple-inspired cuisine. This is true even for painting and calligraphy: illustrated paper-covered architectural partitions were as useful in keeping a room warm as in serving as the highlight of a social gathering; hanging scrolls and flower arrangements displayed in a purpose-built alcove (tokonoma) conveyed delicate political and cultural messages.n nAt a modern museum, as soon as an object is acquired and accessioned into the collection, it ceases to be available to be touched, smelled, or weighed in one's hands. The only contact with warm bodies comes now through the gloved hands of a few trained professionals. A tokonoma alcove, by contrast, has no glass. What is more, a mere hint by the guest will prompt the host to retrieve the object displayed and offer it for close examination, or, as was often the case, actual use by the guests.n nThe sense of closeness between object and body in premodern Japan was intensified by the fact that users were often makers themselves. Socialized utilization became the perfect venue for the assessment, evaluation, and explication of both the techniques of fabrication and the decisions inherent to artistic creation.n nFor these reasons, the ideal way to study Japanese functional objects is to immerse oneself in the tradition by trying one's hand at the fundamental tools and techniques.n nThis course will combine readings, lectures, and practical hands-on training in two core traditional disciplines: woodworking and ceramics. Traditional hand tools will be provided for students to customize and keep. This dimension of the course is made possible by the generous support of the Halpern Family Foundation.n nAttempts to broker a place for traditional craftsmanship in a context of mass production are at the core of modern movements such as William Morris's Arts and Crafts, Walter Gropius's Bauhaus, and Yanagi Soetsu's Mingei. This course is designed for students with interests in making, art history, engineering, anthropology, studio, intellectual history, and the material culture of East Asia more generally.n nNo previous technical expertise required. Course taught in English. Venue: PRL
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-A-II

JAPAN 226: Japanese Functional Objects (JAPAN 126)

This course focuses on the creation of objects at the boundary between the aesthetic allure of fine art and the utilitarian practicality of everyday life. It is also about how we value the objects with which we surround ourselves, connected to issues that go from sustainability to the intimacy of the handmade - of the little but precise tool marks that evoke the skilled expertise of years spent at the workbench.n nTraditionally in Japan the distinction between a work of art and a utilitarian object was inessential. An aesthetic object acquired its cultural identity and social value precisely because it could be used. Famous examples of this duality can be found in tea ceremony ceramics, complex architectural joinery, lavish fabric design, and fine temple-inspired cuisine. This is true even for painting and calligraphy: illustrated paper-covered architectural partitions were as useful in keeping a room warm as in serving as the highlight of a social gathering; hanging scrolls and flower more »
This course focuses on the creation of objects at the boundary between the aesthetic allure of fine art and the utilitarian practicality of everyday life. It is also about how we value the objects with which we surround ourselves, connected to issues that go from sustainability to the intimacy of the handmade - of the little but precise tool marks that evoke the skilled expertise of years spent at the workbench.n nTraditionally in Japan the distinction between a work of art and a utilitarian object was inessential. An aesthetic object acquired its cultural identity and social value precisely because it could be used. Famous examples of this duality can be found in tea ceremony ceramics, complex architectural joinery, lavish fabric design, and fine temple-inspired cuisine. This is true even for painting and calligraphy: illustrated paper-covered architectural partitions were as useful in keeping a room warm as in serving as the highlight of a social gathering; hanging scrolls and flower arrangements displayed in a purpose-built alcove (tokonoma) conveyed delicate political and cultural messages.n nAt a modern museum, as soon as an object is acquired and accessioned into the collection, it ceases to be available to be touched, smelled, or weighed in one's hands. The only contact with warm bodies comes now through the gloved hands of a few trained professionals. A tokonoma alcove, by contrast, has no glass. What is more, a mere hint by the guest will prompt the host to retrieve the object displayed and offer it for close examination, or, as was often the case, actual use by the guests.n nThe sense of closeness between object and body in premodern Japan was intensified by the fact that users were often makers themselves. Socialized utilization became the perfect venue for the assessment, evaluation, and explication of both the techniques of fabrication and the decisions inherent to artistic creation.n nFor these reasons, the ideal way to study Japanese functional objects is to immerse oneself in the tradition by trying one's hand at the fundamental tools and techniques.n nThis course will combine readings, lectures, and practical hands-on training in two core traditional disciplines: woodworking and ceramics. Traditional hand tools will be provided for students to customize and keep. This dimension of the course is made possible by the generous support of the Halpern Family Foundation.n nAttempts to broker a place for traditional craftsmanship in a context of mass production are at the core of modern movements such as William Morris's Arts and Crafts, Walter Gropius's Bauhaus, and Yanagi Soetsu's Mingei. This course is designed for students with interests in making, art history, engineering, anthropology, studio, intellectual history, and the material culture of East Asia more generally.n nNo previous technical expertise required. Course taught in English. Venue: PRL
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MATSCI 200: Master's Research

Participation in a research project.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

PHYSICS 205: Senior Thesis Research

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit
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