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1 - 10 of 10 results for: history 205

AFRICAAM 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (HISTORY 205K, HISTORY 305K)

( History 205K is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305K is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

COMPMED 205: Animal Use in Biomedical Research

How and why animals are used in biomedical science. Addresses human and animal disease entities and how animal research has contributed to the treatment and cure of disease. Significant portions of this course are devoted to documenting the humane care and treatment of laboratory animals in research, including, but not limited to such topics as law and ethics, animal behavior, animal modeling, and the animal activist movement. Course topics will also include: history of animals in research, environmental enrichment for research animals, and research animals in the media.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

EARTHSYS 205A: Fundamentals of Geobiology (ESS 205, GEOLSCI 205)

Lecture and discussion covering key topics in the history of life on Earth, as well as basic principles that apply to life in the universe. Co-evolution of Earth and life; critical intervals of environmental and biological change; geomicrobiology; paleobiology; global biogeochemical cycles; scaling of geobiological processes in space and time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

ESS 205: Fundamentals of Geobiology (EARTHSYS 205A, GEOLSCI 205)

Lecture and discussion covering key topics in the history of life on Earth, as well as basic principles that apply to life in the universe. Co-evolution of Earth and life; critical intervals of environmental and biological change; geomicrobiology; paleobiology; global biogeochemical cycles; scaling of geobiological processes in space and time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

GEOLSCI 205: Fundamentals of Geobiology (EARTHSYS 205A, ESS 205)

Lecture and discussion covering key topics in the history of life on Earth, as well as basic principles that apply to life in the universe. Co-evolution of Earth and life; critical intervals of environmental and biological change; geomicrobiology; paleobiology; global biogeochemical cycles; scaling of geobiological processes in space and time.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

HISTORY 205D: Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s (AFRICAAM 113V, AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V)

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 205K: The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti (AFRICAAM 205K, HISTORY 305K)

( History 205K is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; History 305K is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 205L: Prostitution & Sex Trafficking: Regulating Morality and the Status of Women

Examines governmental policies toward prostitution from the late 19th century to the present. Focuses on the underlying attitudes, assumptions, strategies, and consequences of various historical and current legal frameworks regulating prostitution, including: prohibitionism, abolitionism, legalization, partial decriminalization, and full decriminalization. Special focus on these policies' effects on sex trafficking, sex worker rights, and the status of women. Emphasis on Europe and the U.S., with additional cases from across the globe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

LAW 5029: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

(Formerly Law 675) This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, including trafficking for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ harvesting. In each of these areas, we will focus on human rights violations and remedies. The course aims to: 1. Provide the historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. 2. Analyze current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluate their practical implementation. 3. Examine the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. 4. Stimulate ideas for new interventions. Instruction will combine lectures and small group discussion, and uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should also enroll in History 6W/7W ( FemGen 6W/7W), a two-quarter service learning workshop. Elements used in grading: Attendance; participation; written assignments; and final exam. This class is cross-listed with Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies ( FEMGEN 5C, FEMGEN 105C), History ( HISTORY 5C, 105C), Human Biology ( HUMBIO 178T), International Relations ( INTNLREL 105C) & School of Medicine General ( SOMGEN 205).
Last offered: Winter 2017

REES 205: The Business of Socialism: Economic Life in Cold War Eastern Europe (HISTORY 227B)

This colloquium investigates the processes of buying, making, and selling goods and services in Cold War Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. We will familiarize ourselves with a variety of approaches to writing the history of economic life and discuss to what extent they are applicable to state socialist systems. Our focus will not be on theories of socialism but on empirically grounded studies that allow for insights into how the system operated in practice and interacted with capitalism. We will, among others, explore the following questions: What was the role of the state in the economies east and west of the Iron Curtain? Are socialism and capitalism two incompatible systems? How did women experience and shape economic life after the Second World War? What had a greater impact on the economies of the region: Cold War politics or globalization?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Dovern, L. (PI)
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