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1 - 10 of 24 results for: global heritage

AFRICAST 115: Excavating Enslavement (AFRICAST 215)

This is a project-based course, intended to scaffold a joint initiative, Aftermaths of Enslavement: curating legacies publicly. Both course and project seek to better understand enslaved pasts by (a) curating materials that advance scholarly research, using technologies that maximize access and utility; and (b) by developing learning materials for schools and popular audiences by working with heritage professionals and teachers. The focus is on the Indian Ocean World, particularly the Cape (South Africa) and Mauritius, within global and comparative frameworks. Readings for each week will juxtapose Cape and other slave systems. Project partners and other guests will join individual sessions. Students unable to attend the sessions should contact the instructor to discuss asynchronous alternatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

AFRICAST 215: Excavating Enslavement (AFRICAST 115)

This is a project-based course, intended to scaffold a joint initiative, Aftermaths of Enslavement: curating legacies publicly. Both course and project seek to better understand enslaved pasts by (a) curating materials that advance scholarly research, using technologies that maximize access and utility; and (b) by developing learning materials for schools and popular audiences by working with heritage professionals and teachers. The focus is on the Indian Ocean World, particularly the Cape (South Africa) and Mauritius, within global and comparative frameworks. Readings for each week will juxtapose Cape and other slave systems. Project partners and other guests will join individual sessions. Students unable to attend the sessions should contact the instructor to discuss asynchronous alternatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)

ANTHRO 77: Heritage Theory and Practice: Current Approaches to Tangible and Intangible Heritage (ARCHLGY 77)

This is an introductory course to heritage studies that aims at familiarizing undergraduates with how heritage has been theorized and utilized by multi-disciplinary practitioners in the present global context. It will walk students through how heritage conversations evolved from being primarily dedicated to material tangibility that was rooted in inherent 'heritage value', to a deeper understanding of given value through intangibility of heritage. The focus will be on familiarizing students with the multi-disciplinary and agentic approach to heritage studies in the present day, which manifests in critical conversations in architecture, archaeology, and, anthropology, which are instrumentalized within issues of policy, conflict, urban & non-urban development, museums, social fabric & culture, etc.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Gupta, S. (PI)

ANTHRO 114: Rights and Ethics in Heritage (ANTHRO 214, ARCHLGY 114)

Heritage is a human thing: made by people and mobilized for their own purposes, it has a range of effects on communities. This course focuses on the human dimension of heritage with special attention to questions of rights and ethics. Where can we locate the intersections of heritage and rights? How do communities and governing structures negotiate control over and participation in heritage, and with what impacts on people? Which ethical challenges arise and how have archaeologists, heritage managers, museums, legislators, community leaders, and others approached these issues?The first half of this seminar course focuses on the theoretical and contextual basis for these discussions. We will address topics such as cultural ownership and participation as well as the global and governing contexts within which heritage is mobilized. Building on this, the second half examines cases in which different rights, needs, and goals come into conflict: museum practice, public memory, upheaval stemming from violence or disaster, and the ethics of the material world itself. Throughout, we will highlight heritage in relation to communities, rights, and responsibilities, all while thinking through ethical modes of heritage research and practice.
Last offered: Autumn 2020

ANTHRO 118C: Heritage Development in the Global South (ARCHLGY 116)

Heritage is a site of both promise and contestation in the Global South. These nations use it for a wide range of purposes: Peru¿s thriving tourism sector rests on a basis of heritage attractions, South Africa negotiates a post-apartheid identity through heritage, and India places increasing numbers of sites on the World Heritage List. Outlining different modes of heritage production and interpretation, this class investigates heritage regimes on scales ranging from local communities and national governance to international recognition. We will examine the role of heritage in building communities and identity; the place of heritage within economic development; the efforts of Global South countries to negotiate the legacies of colonialism and global inequality through managing their pasts; and the deployment of heritage as part of international power struggles within worldwide structures like UNESCO. Drawing on anthropology, heritage studies, and archaeology, students will gain a deeper understanding of how heritage is used by Global South countries to produce identity, support development, domesticate the past, and build the future.
Last offered: Winter 2019

ANTHRO 129C: A Deep Dive Into the Indian Ocean: From Prehistory to the Modern Day (ANTHRO 229C, ARCHLGY 129C, OCEANS 129C, OCEANS 229C)

The Indian Ocean has formed an enduring connection between three continents, countless small islands and a multitude of cultural and ethnic groups and has become the focus of increasing interest in this geographically vast and culturally diverse region. This course explores a range of topics and issues, from the nature and dynamics of colonization and cultural development as a way of understanding the human experience in this part of the world, to topics such as religion, disease, and heritage The course guides studies in the many ways in which research in the Indian Ocean has a direct impact on our ability to compare developments in the Atlantic and Pacific. Significant work outside of class time is expected of the student for this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Seetah, K. (PI)

ANTHRO 136C: Latin American Pasts: Archaeology and Cultural Heritage (ARCHLGY 136)

Latin America is vast in pre-colonial and colonial monuments. Past societies defined by archaeologists - Aztecas, Chavin, Chinchorro, Inka, Maya, Moche, Nazca, Tiahuanaco, among others - cohabit with Spanish colonial era structures and contemporary human settlements. Most studies on Latin America have focused on monuments, conservation and sustainability, overlooking economic and social struggles related to heritage use and management. Selecting certain case studies of famous archaeological sites, this class will explore the main characteristics of pre-Hispanic cultures from an archaeological perspective as well as from critical heritage studies. Currently, Latin American regions and entire states have adopted some of these 'archaeological cultures' and redefined them as their 'ancestors', adopting archaeological discourses in their daily lives. In addition to learning about these sites archaeologically, this class will analyze native communities´ claims, development projects, education narratives, nation-branding documentaries and marketing spots, memes, and other resources. The class will also consider the accelerated urban growth of these areas - a major feature of Latin American and global south countries - and the consequences for the development of heritage and its sustainable conservation in the Spanish-speaking Americas.
Last offered: Spring 2022 | UG Reqs: WAY-EDP, WAY-SI

ANTHRO 147B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 247B, ARCHLGY 147B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Last offered: Winter 2018

ANTHRO 214: Rights and Ethics in Heritage (ANTHRO 114, ARCHLGY 114)

Heritage is a human thing: made by people and mobilized for their own purposes, it has a range of effects on communities. This course focuses on the human dimension of heritage with special attention to questions of rights and ethics. Where can we locate the intersections of heritage and rights? How do communities and governing structures negotiate control over and participation in heritage, and with what impacts on people? Which ethical challenges arise and how have archaeologists, heritage managers, museums, legislators, community leaders, and others approached these issues?The first half of this seminar course focuses on the theoretical and contextual basis for these discussions. We will address topics such as cultural ownership and participation as well as the global and governing contexts within which heritage is mobilized. Building on this, the second half examines cases in which different rights, needs, and goals come into conflict: museum practice, public memory, upheaval stemming from violence or disaster, and the ethics of the material world itself. Throughout, we will highlight heritage in relation to communities, rights, and responsibilities, all while thinking through ethical modes of heritage research and practice.
Last offered: Autumn 2020

ANTHRO 247B: World Heritage in Global Conflict (ANTHRO 147B, ARCHLGY 147B)

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Last offered: Winter 2018
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