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1 - 10 of 546 results for: film

AFRICAAM 37: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads Performance Project (DANCE 30)

An interdisciplinary project-based class to develop dance technique, collaborative choreography, and associated visual and musical arts. We invite dancers, movers, and emerging creators of all styles and backgrounds. The Autumn 21-22 project theme will be Chocolate Heads at the Cantor: Dance, Upcycled Fashion, and the Cinematic Eye. The Chocolate Heads will continue the practice of creating intermedia events using dance, film projection on bodies and surfaces, live DJ, vocals, and runway presentation. This site-specific dance performance will feature upcycled costumes co-constructed by the students under the designer's supervision. Students chosen to participate will engage in interrelated choreographic and art-making collaborations which address street performance, fashion ecologies, and social platforms. To be presented Feb. 2022 at the Cantor Art Center, we will reimagine the runway space as an arena for collective moving performance, while modeling ways of being that are body positive, transcultural, and gender expansive. All levels of experience are welcome. Week 1: TU 9/21--Introduction to project, creative team & CHs Band; THU 9/23--1st Audition Workshop. Contact Instructor (Aleta Hayes ahayes1@stanford.edu) for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 49S: African Futures: Nationalism, Pan-Africanism, and Beyond (HISTORY 49S)

This course examines decolonization and its aftermath in sub-Saharan Africa. With a "wind of change" sweeping the continent, how did Africans imagine their futures together? From W.E.B. Du Bois to Black Panther, this course will engage in historical readings of political essays, speeches, film, and literature to consider how Africans envisioned their communities beyond empire. Topics will include a variety of projects for African unity, from experiments with Pan-Africanism, to religious revivalism, to Afrofuturist art and aesthetics.
Last offered: Autumn 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 53S: Black San Francisco (HISTORY 53S)

For over a century African-Americans have shaped the contours of San Francisco, a globally recognized metropolis, but their histories remain hidden. While endangered, Black San Francisco is still very much alive, and its history is an inextricable piece of the city's social and cultural fabric. This course aims to uncover the often-overlooked history of African-Americans in the city of San Francisco. The history of Black San Francisco unravels the myth of San Francisco liberalism showing how systemic racial oppression greatly limited the social mobility of non-whites well into the 20th century. Conversely, this course will also highlight the rich cultural and artistic legacies of Black San Franciscans with special attention on their ability to create social. Starting with the small, but influential middle and upper classes of African-Americans, who supported abolitionism from the West in the mid-late nineteenth century, to the rapid growth of the black population during WWII and moving more »
For over a century African-Americans have shaped the contours of San Francisco, a globally recognized metropolis, but their histories remain hidden. While endangered, Black San Francisco is still very much alive, and its history is an inextricable piece of the city's social and cultural fabric. This course aims to uncover the often-overlooked history of African-Americans in the city of San Francisco. The history of Black San Francisco unravels the myth of San Francisco liberalism showing how systemic racial oppression greatly limited the social mobility of non-whites well into the 20th century. Conversely, this course will also highlight the rich cultural and artistic legacies of Black San Franciscans with special attention on their ability to create social. Starting with the small, but influential middle and upper classes of African-Americans, who supported abolitionism from the West in the mid-late nineteenth century, to the rapid growth of the black population during WWII and moving through post-war struggles against the forces of Jim Crow and environmental racism. This course will explore: What is Black San Francisco? How did African-Americans shape the culture and politics of San Francisco, and where does the history of Black San Francisco fit into the broader national historical narrative? Conversely, what is unique about San Francisco and similar black communities in the West? How do we reconstruct the past of people going South to West as opposed to South to North? And finally, as raised in the critically acclaimed 2019 film, The Last Black Man in San Francisco and eluded by the late Dr. Martin Luther King, where does black San Franciscans, go from here?
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

AFRICAAM 101Q: Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film (AMSTUD 42Q, CSRE 41Q)

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books? NOTE: Students must attend the first day; admission to the class will be determined based on an in class essay.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 114C: America Never was America to me: Race and Equity in US Public Schools (CSRE 114C, EDUC 114C, EDUC 314C)

This cross-disciplinary course will use the 10-part docu-series "America to Me" to discuss the complexities of race and equity in US schools. The series follows a year in the life of a racially diverse, well-resourced high school outside Chicago, providing an in-depth look at the effects of race, equity, culture and privilege on educational opportunities, and offers insights into the teenage search for personal identity in today's climate. Two of the people featured in the series will be a part of the class, and after screening each episode, a Stanford professor will give a short talk inspired by the content of that episode. The talks will span several disciplines and theoretical perspectives, including Critical Race Theory, History, Psychology, Youth Development, Film Studies, Linguistics, and Teacher Education. Following each talk, students will engage in critical discussion around race and equity in education. Episode 10 will air during Final Exam week, but there will be no final exam.
Last offered: Spring 2019

AFRICAAM 117J: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film (AMSTUD 117, ASNAMST 117D, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F)

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since 2000, students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States. Readings include work by Michael Omi & Howard Winant, Patricia Hill Collins, Jodi Melamed, Stuart Hall, Lisa Duggan and bell hooks. Films to be discussed include Moonlight, Mosquita y Mari, Kumu Hina, Hustlers, and Crazy Rich Asians. To enroll in the course, please fill out the following form: https://forms.gle/RKqURW6niyB1LRyEA
Last offered: Winter 2021 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 145B: Africa in the 20th Century (HISTORY 145B)

(Same as HISTORY 45B. Students taking 5 units, register for 145B.) CREATIVITY. AGENCY. RESILIENCE. This is the African history with which this course will engage. African scholars and knowledge production of Africa that explicitly engages with theories of race and global Blackness will take center stage. TRADE. RELIGION. CONQUEST. MIGRATION. These are the transformations of the 20th century which we shall interrogate and reposition. Yet these groundbreaking events did not happen in a vacuum. As historians, we also think about the continent's rich traditions and histories prior to the 20th century.. FICTION. NONFICTION. FILM. MUSIC. Far from being peripheral to political transformation, African creative arts advanced discourse on gender, technology, and environmental history within the continent and without. We will listen to African creative artists not only as creators, but as agents for change.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI, GER:DB-SocSci

AFRICAAM 244: Re(positioning) Disability: Historical, Cultural, and Social Lenses (CSRE 143, EDUC 144, PEDS 246D)

This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students of any major to important theoretical and practical concepts regarding special education, disability, and diversity. This course primarily addresses the social construction of disability and its intersection with race and class through the critical examination of history, law, social media, film, and other texts. Students will engage in reflection about their own as well as broader U.S. discourses moving towards deeper understanding of necessary societal and educational changes to address inequities. Successful completion of this course fulfills one requirement for the School of Education minor in Education.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

AFRICAAM 291: Riot: Visualizing Civil Unrest in the 20th and 21st Centuries (AFRICAAM 491, ARTHIST 291, ARTHIST 491, CSRE 290, CSRE 390, FILMEDIA 291, FILMEDIA 491)

This seminar explores the visual legacy of civil unrest in the United States. Focusing on the 1965 Watts Rebellion, 1992 Los Angeles Riots, 2014 Ferguson Uprising, and 2020 George Floyd Uprisings. Students closely examine photographs, television broadcasts, newspapers, magazines, and film and video representations of unrest. Additionally, students will visually analyze the works of artists who have responded to the instances of police brutality and challenged the systemic racism, xenophobia, and anti-Black violence leading to and surrounding these events.nNOTE: Instructor consent required for undergraduate students. Please contact the instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)

AFRICAAM 491: Riot: Visualizing Civil Unrest in the 20th and 21st Centuries (AFRICAAM 291, ARTHIST 291, ARTHIST 491, CSRE 290, CSRE 390, FILMEDIA 291, FILMEDIA 491)

This seminar explores the visual legacy of civil unrest in the United States. Focusing on the 1965 Watts Rebellion, 1992 Los Angeles Riots, 2014 Ferguson Uprising, and 2020 George Floyd Uprisings. Students closely examine photographs, television broadcasts, newspapers, magazines, and film and video representations of unrest. Additionally, students will visually analyze the works of artists who have responded to the instances of police brutality and challenged the systemic racism, xenophobia, and anti-Black violence leading to and surrounding these events.nNOTE: Instructor consent required for undergraduate students. Please contact the instructor for permission to enroll.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Salseda, R. (PI)
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