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1 - 9 of 9 results for: family stories

ENGLISH 15Q: Family Trees: The Intergenerational Novel

The vast majority of novels feature a central protagonist, or a cast of characters whose interactions play out over weeks or months. But some stories overflow our life spans, and cannot be truthfully told without the novelist reaching far back in time. In this Sophomore Seminar, we will consider three novels that seek to tell larger, more ambitious stories that span decades and continents. In the process, we will discuss how novelists build believable worlds, craft memorable characters, keep us engaged as readers, and manage such ambitious projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Smith, A. (PI)

ENGLISH 16Q: Family Stories

This creative writing workshop will explore the idea of family. We¿ll begin with our questions: How do we conceptualize the word family? How do family histories, stories, mythologies, and languages shape our narratives? What does family have to do with the construction of a self? How can we investigate the self and all of its many contexts in writing? We¿ll consider how we might work from our questions in order to craft work that is meaningful and revealing. Students will have the opportunity to write in both poetry and prose, as well as to develop their own creative cross-genre projects. Along the way, we¿ll discuss elements of craft essential to strong writing: how to turn the self into a speaker; how create the world of a piece through image, detail, and metaphor; how to craft beautiful sentences and lines; how to find a form; and many other topics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Perham, B. (PI)

FEMGEN 180: Gender Relations in Islam (RELIGST 180)

This course investigates the ways in which gender identities and relationships between men and women have been articulated, constructed, and refashioned throughout the Muslim world. Starting with problematizing the fixed notions of gender and sexuality, we map the attitudes toward these notions through visiting a diverse array of sources from the Qur¿an, Sunna, and legal documents to historical and anthropological case studies, literature, and film from South East Asia to Europe and North America. We examine the notions of femininity and masculinity in the Qur¿an, family laws, and attitudes toward homosexuality and transgendered populations. We read examples of ambiguous use of language with regards to gender and sexuality in Persian poetry and mystical traditions. We study the dynamic relationship between Islam and Feminism in the Muslim world. Finally, we witness the implications of these attitudes in our case studies and stories, from a divorce court in Iran to a wedding in Sudan.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

PSYCH 141S: The Psychology of Health: Culture, Self, and Society

What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertis more »
What is health? How does someone become healthy or maintain good health? In the US, mainstream narratives about health tend to focus on individual choices and behavior. In this course, we take a broader focus, examining how individual health is shaped by social interactions (e.g., with family, friends, doctors), institutions (e.g., media, policy, advertising), and broad cultural ideas and values (e.g., personal responsibility, independence). Drawing from psychological research, we will examine topics at the intersection of self and society, including: the role of stress, stigma and blame in shaping health and wellbeing, cultural processes contributing to health disparities, attitudes about the proper role of government in shaping public health, and the erosion of trust in medical authority (e.g. anti-vaccination attitudes). We will also consider how race, gender, and socioeconomic status impact health outcomes. Throughout the course, we will analyze cultural products including advertisements, media stories, health PSAs, and government statements to better understand the transmission of cultural ideas of health. Finally, we will discuss various opportunities and barriers to creating social and cultural change regarding health. The course will empower students learn to recognize and analyze the influence of culture on everyday functioning and apply that understanding to improving their own and other people's health outcomes.
Last offered: Summer 2019

PWR 91E: Intermediate Writing: The Oral Tradition: Myth, Folklore, and Fairy Tale

Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response more »
Contemporary storytelling covers a variety of media - from movies to novels, theatre and beyond. What this course offers is an in depth study of the roots of that practice - the oral tradition.nnnOver the course we will explore many different motifs and structures that arise in the oral tradition, myth, folklore and fairy tale. What universal themes do we detect, and what separates the progression of a pacific north west Trickster story from an Arthurian romance? Why is it that in the early twenty first century many of our most acclaimed art forms carry narrative forms that are thousands of years old? Star Wars, Lord of the Rings and the recent broadway show Jerusalem, all follow scenic progressions informed by myth.nnnThe first encounter with the story will be an oral narrative - the myth told unscripted in the classroom. The stories, which range from the Arthurian romance Parzival to Trickster folk tales, will be told in several sections - with a running exegesis and student response alongside. Many of these stories are now transcripts and have become works of literature. We will explore both the complementary aspects of this development, and areas of tension.nnnDuring the course each student will embark on a project that demonstrates a thorough understanding of the topics covered, and utilizes those elements in their wider practice of writing and rhetoric. nnnThe project will be to research a story handed down within the family - an adventure of some distant relative, or a family migration from one country to another. Factoring in elements from the taught class, the student will mythologize the story: by writing an in depth commentary on its implications - factoring in contemporary, psychological and metaphorical associations. The second element will be to tell the story to the class. In these way we experience myth as a living principle, not something just from `a long time ago.¿
Last offered: Winter 2014 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

PWR 91F: Finding Your Story

Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks an more »
Life challenges us to become aware of the stories that shape us--family stories, cultural mythologies, even popular movies, television shows, and songs--and then create and live our own story. We face this challenge throughout our lives but perhaps most acutely as we move into adulthood; this is the period when we most need to become conscious of stories and their power, to gather wisdom, practices, and resources for finding our own story. This class, designed with seniors in mind, will illuminate and explore these resources and give you the opportunity to reflect deeply, in discussion and writing, on what truly calls to you in this life. We will engage with some of the world's great stories--myths, parables, teaching tales, modern fiction, even aphorisms, koans, and riddles. In them we can find both elements that resonate with our own story and provocations that help us unearth and cultivate our native gifts--the genius in each of us. We will look at short excerpts from masterworks and myths from around the world, all voices in the largest conversation we have as humans, the one that asks: who am I? why am I here? what truly matters? how can I be happy? Together we will investigate how these stories, and stories like them, can be used to help us find our own story. Students in this course will have a special opportunity to meet personally with poet Billy Collins and singer Aimee Mann when they visit campus in April. Does not fulfill NSC requirement. For students who have completed the first level of the writing requirement and want further work in developing writing abilities, especially within discipline-specific contexts and nonfiction genres. Individual conferences with instructor and peer workshops. Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For more information, see http://www.stanford.edu/dept/undergrad/cgi-bin/drupal_pwr/advanced_pwr.
Last offered: Spring 2016 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

RELIGST 180: Gender Relations in Islam (FEMGEN 180)

This course investigates the ways in which gender identities and relationships between men and women have been articulated, constructed, and refashioned throughout the Muslim world. Starting with problematizing the fixed notions of gender and sexuality, we map the attitudes toward these notions through visiting a diverse array of sources from the Qur¿an, Sunna, and legal documents to historical and anthropological case studies, literature, and film from South East Asia to Europe and North America. We examine the notions of femininity and masculinity in the Qur¿an, family laws, and attitudes toward homosexuality and transgendered populations. We read examples of ambiguous use of language with regards to gender and sexuality in Persian poetry and mystical traditions. We study the dynamic relationship between Islam and Feminism in the Muslim world. Finally, we witness the implications of these attitudes in our case studies and stories, from a divorce court in Iran to a wedding in Sudan.
Last offered: Autumn 2017 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI

SLAVIC 146: The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (SLAVIC 346)

The two giant novels we will read and discuss closely were above all urgent actions taken in the heat of present crisis. War and Peace (1865-1869), Leo Tolstoy's epic family saga of Russia's historic resistance to Napoleon and the modern "will-to-power," and The Brothers Karamazov (1878-1880), Dostoevsky's tragicomic investigation into the roots of familial perversion, crimes of individual thought and collective performance, fascinate us with the striking contrasts of their novels' aesthetic responses and innovations. The final focus of the course will be on several of Anton Chekhov's short stories that re-play the themes of the Russian novel with compressed indirectness, pushing the great realist novel's dominance firmly into "history."
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II

SLAVIC 346: The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (SLAVIC 146)

The two giant novels we will read and discuss closely were above all urgent actions taken in the heat of present crisis. War and Peace (1865-1869), Leo Tolstoy's epic family saga of Russia's historic resistance to Napoleon and the modern "will-to-power," and The Brothers Karamazov (1878-1880), Dostoevsky's tragicomic investigation into the roots of familial perversion, crimes of individual thought and collective performance, fascinate us with the striking contrasts of their novels' aesthetic responses and innovations. The final focus of the course will be on several of Anton Chekhov's short stories that re-play the themes of the Russian novel with compressed indirectness, pushing the great realist novel's dominance firmly into "history."
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
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