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1 - 5 of 5 results for: earth systems 10

EARTHSYS 10: Introduction to Earth Systems

For non-majors and prospective Earth Systems majors. Multidisciplinary approach using the principles of geology, biology, engineering, and economics to describe how the Earth operates as an interconnected, integrated system. Goal is to understand global change on all time scales. Focus is on sciences, technological principles, and sociopolitical approaches applied to solid earth, oceans, water, energy, and food and population. Case studies: environmental degradation, loss of biodiversity, and resource sustainability.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 180: Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture (ESS 280)

Field-based training in ecologically sound agricultural practices at the Stanford Community Farm. Weekly lessons, field work, and group projects. Field trips to educational farms in the area. Topics include: soils, composting, irrigation techniques, IPM, basic plant anatomy and physiology, weeds, greenhouse management, and marketing. Application required. Deadline: September 10 for Autumn and March 10 for Spring. https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3l0kOiLP8DhwS1fnnApplication: https://stanforduniversity.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_0ANZWrjlz0SbhxX
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Repeatable for credit

EARTHSYS 187A: The Future of Food & Farming Technology

"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural system more »
"How are we going to feed X billion people by the year ____?" A historical refrain from corporate agribusiness, academia, national policy makers and, increasingly today, investors and technologists in innovation hotspots like Silicon Valley. But with only 60 global harvests remaining due to soil degradation, the compounding feedback loop between agriculture and climate change, and nearly a billion of our current population starving or undernourished and another billion of them overweight or obese, it begs the question of whether this is the right problem for which our food system should be solving. Some even argue, including the designers of this course, that this question is responsible for the various existential crises we face today.nnThis course will examine the history of agricultural innovation and technology to look for insights as to why our food system has gone so far off the rails. We will utilize the Stanford Educational Farm as a scaled-down model of our agricultural systems, where each student will step into the role of a modern, large scale farmer under simulated conditions. Through gamified scenarios based on real-world challenges faced by farmers, students will gain a deeper understanding of the problems facing our agriculture. Based on this nuanced understanding, students will propose new and novel uses of existing and/or emerging technologies to solve these problems. These ideas will be circulated in the marketplace of your peer farmers, where ideas will either be adopted, modified and built upon, or abandoned. This process will tap into, challenge, and hone your creative problem solving abilities. In the end, we will see who has what it takes to fundamentally shift the course of our food system,nnThis class is for students who are (a) aspiring ag-tech entrepreneurs (b) generally interested in emerging technologies or (c) seeking a deeper understanding of how large scale agriculture works.nnThe application for this course can be found on the d.school¿s website: https://dschool.stanford.edu/classes/nnCourse meets : Saturday May 4th, 10 am to 3pm, Saturday May 11th, 10am to 3pm, Saturday May 25th, 10am to 3pm
Last offered: Spring 2019

ESS 10SC: In the Age of the Anthropocene: Coupled-Human Natural Systems of Southeast Alaska

Southeast Alaska is often described as America's "last frontier," embodying a physical reality of the "pristine" that was once revered by the early romantics and founders of the modern conservation movement throughout Western North America. Although endowed with more designated Wilderness land than any other state, Alaska remains a working landscape: a mixed cash-subsistence economy where communities rely upon the harvest and export of natural resources. Here, ecosystem services remain tangible, and people living in communities that are unconnected by roads confront questions of sustainability on a daily basis. This field-based course introduces students to the global questions of land use change and sustainable resource management in the American West through the place-based exploration of Southeast Alaska. Focused on four key social-ecological challenges -- fisheries, forestry, tourism, and energy -- the coupled human-natural systems of Southeast Alaska provide a unique lens for stud more »
Southeast Alaska is often described as America's "last frontier," embodying a physical reality of the "pristine" that was once revered by the early romantics and founders of the modern conservation movement throughout Western North America. Although endowed with more designated Wilderness land than any other state, Alaska remains a working landscape: a mixed cash-subsistence economy where communities rely upon the harvest and export of natural resources. Here, ecosystem services remain tangible, and people living in communities that are unconnected by roads confront questions of sustainability on a daily basis. This field-based course introduces students to the global questions of land use change and sustainable resource management in the American West through the place-based exploration of Southeast Alaska. Focused on four key social-ecological challenges -- fisheries, forestry, tourism, and energy -- the coupled human-natural systems of Southeast Alaska provide a unique lens for students to interpret broader resource management and conservation issues. The curriculum balances field explorations and classroom lectures with community exploration in which students will engage with fishermen, hatchery workers, forest managers, loggers, mill owners, tour operators, tourists, city officials, citizens, and Native residents. Students will catch their own salmon, walk through old-growth and logged forests, kayak next to glacial moraines, and witness the impacts of human activities, both local and global, on the social-ecological systems around them. In the context of rapidly changing ecosystems, students will confront the historical, ecological, and economic complexities of environmental stewardship in this region. By embedding their experiences within frameworks of land change science, land-ocean interactions, ecosystem ecology, and natural resource management and economics, students will leave this course ready to apply what they have learned to the global challenges of sustainability and conservation that pervade systems far beyond Alaska. This course is co-sponsored by the School of Earth Sciences and takes place in Sitka, Alaska. Students arrange for their arrival at the seminar's point of origin; all subsequent travel is made possible by Sophomore College and the School of Earth Sciences.
Terms: Sum | Units: 2
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

GES 50Q: The Coastal Zone Environment

Preference to sophomores. The oceanographic, geological, and biological character of coastal zone environments, including continental shelves, estuaries, and coastal wetlands, with emphasis on San Francisco Bay. Five required field trips examine estuarine and coastal environments, and agencies and facilities that manage these resources. Students present original research. Prerequisite: beginning course in Biology such as BIOSCI 51, Chemistry such as CHEM 30 or 31, Earth Sciences such as GES 1 or 2, or Earth Systems such as EARTHSYS 10.
Last offered: Winter 2006 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
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