2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 13 results for: colonial archaeology

AFRICAAM 117: Maroon Freedom: Black Resistance, Autonomy, and Fugitivity in the U.S. South

Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary appro more »
Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary approach to investigating maroon survival, autonomy, gender, kinship, community, and the relationship between marronage and insurrection. We examine a wide range of evidence spanning periodicals, state mandates, archaeology, runaway slave advertisements, slave narratives, oral histories, and traveler¿s logs, in addition to secondary literature.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 5

ANTHRO 65: Looking out from California: Introduction to North American Prehistoric Archaeology (ARCHLGY 65, NATIVEAM 65)

This course is an archaeological/anthropological course that surveys the different indigenous prehistoric culture areas of North America, and the archaeological approaches to its academic and non-academic study. Topics covered in this course include: the peopling of the New World, subsistence strategies, trade, settlement systems, warfare, religion, social inequality, egalitarianism, the origins of agriculture, identity, gender, environmental relations, and colonial empires among many others. These topics will be explored in class using archaeological case studies paired with instructor lectures as a means to bridge the student's regional competency of ancient cultures with in-depth archaeological research methods.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ANTHRO 102B: Aztec Language and Culture

Introduction to Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs. Also known as Mexicano, Nahuatl was once used as a lingua franca throughout Mesoamerica, and is today spoken by about 1.5 million people. Emphasis on vocabulary. colonial documents, including Central Mexican codices, and archaeology. Attention also given to modern dialects, the place of Nahuatl in the Uto-Aztecan language phylum, and the relationship between Nahuatl and Aztec culture. Appropriate for students interested in linguistics, anthropology, archaeology, and history, and those desiring to better understand the native linguistic heritage of Mesoamerica and its impact on Spanish.
Last offered: Spring 2014

ANTHRO 120: The Maya

Lecture course on the ancient and modern Maya. We explore the archaeology, ecology, culture, and language history of the Maya from the earliest times to the Classic Maya Collapse in the 9th-10th Centuries A.D., and examine also the Post-Classic, the Conquest, and Colonial Periods, and the persistence and impact of the Maya in present-day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, El Salvador, and diasporic Maya in the United States. The course acquaints students with the cultural achievements of the Maya in the context of the anthropology and archaeology of civilization, and considers issues of identity over vast periods of time. It includes discussion of the roles of isolation, contact, and geography in Maya history; principles of archaeological excavation and interpretation as applied to the Maya city-states, especially to their rise and fall; Maya hieroglyphic writing and its decipherment; Maya mythology and the Popol Vuh; Maya art in its Mesoamerican context; ethical issues in the management of Maya archaeological sites; principles of ethnographic analysis as applied in modern Maya communities, and Maya rebellions against colonial and modern states. Anthropology concentration: CS, Arch. No prerequisites.
Last offered: Spring 2017

ANTHRO 317: Colonial Archives and Archaeology: Models and Methods of Analysis

This course details the methodological challenges associated with using primary historical documents, ethnographic methods and sources and archaeological data. How do archaeologists deal with multiple sources of data, primary texts (translated and original) and ethnographic materials? This course examines archaeological monographs as models for individual student projects leading to dissertation research and publishing beyond the dissertation. Students will be required to present materials, research questions and primary source materials to the class in order to expand our understanding of the challenges and insights provided by archival and archaeological studies.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ANTHRO 374: Archaeology of Colonialism/Postcolonialisms

Advanced graduate seminar focused on the archaeology of colonial and postcolonial contexts, both prehistoric and historic. Emphasis on intersections between archaeological research and and subaltern, postcolonial, and transnational feminist/queer theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Last offered: Autumn 2018

ARCHLGY 16: Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America (ANTHRO 16, NATIVEAM 16)

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Wilcox, M. (PI)

ARCHLGY 65: Looking out from California: Introduction to North American Prehistoric Archaeology (ANTHRO 65, NATIVEAM 65)

This course is an archaeological/anthropological course that surveys the different indigenous prehistoric culture areas of North America, and the archaeological approaches to its academic and non-academic study. Topics covered in this course include: the peopling of the New World, subsistence strategies, trade, settlement systems, warfare, religion, social inequality, egalitarianism, the origins of agriculture, identity, gender, environmental relations, and colonial empires among many others. These topics will be explored in class using archaeological case studies paired with instructor lectures as a means to bridge the student's regional competency of ancient cultures with in-depth archaeological research methods.
Last offered: Autumn 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

ARCHLGY 132: The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique (ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 232, ARCHLGY 332)

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Last offered: Winter 2012

ARCHLGY 232: The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique (ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 132, ARCHLGY 332)

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Last offered: Winter 2012
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints