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1 - 5 of 5 results for: arthist 2

ARTHIST 2: Asian Arts and Cultures (JAPAN 60)

An exploration of the visual arts of East and South Asia from ancient to modern times, in their social, religious, literary and political contexts. Analysis of major monuments of painting, sculpture and architecture will be organized around themes that include ritual and funerary arts, Buddhist art and architecture across Asia, landscape and narrative painting, culture and authority in court arts, and urban arts in the early modern world.
Last offered: Winter 2020 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II

ARTHIST 156: American and European Art, 1945-1968 (ARTHIST 356)

Examines the pivotal figures, movements, themes and practices of art in the United States and Europe, from the conclusion of World War 2 to the end of the 1960s. Emphasis is on the changed nature of the avant-garde after the catastrophic events of midcentury. Topics include: modern art, ideology and the Cold War; the rise of consumer society and the "Society of the Spectacle"; concepts of medium specificity; the impact of new media and technologies on postwar art making; the role of the artist as worker and activist. Movements include: Abstract Expressionism, Art Informel, Pop, minimalism, process, performance conceptual art. An introductory art history course is recommended.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ARTHIST 298: Individual Work: Art History

Prerequisite: student must have taken a course with the instructor and/or completed relevant introductory course(s). Instructor consent and completion of the Independent Study Form are required prior to enrollment. All necessary forms and payment are required by the end of Week 2 of each quarter. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator in McMurtry 108 for more information. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

ARTHIST 356: American and European Art, 1945-1968 (ARTHIST 156)

Examines the pivotal figures, movements, themes and practices of art in the United States and Europe, from the conclusion of World War 2 to the end of the 1960s. Emphasis is on the changed nature of the avant-garde after the catastrophic events of midcentury. Topics include: modern art, ideology and the Cold War; the rise of consumer society and the "Society of the Spectacle"; concepts of medium specificity; the impact of new media and technologies on postwar art making; the role of the artist as worker and activist. Movements include: Abstract Expressionism, Art Informel, Pop, minimalism, process, performance conceptual art. An introductory art history course is recommended.
Last offered: Winter 2013

ARTHIST 442: Art History in the First Person

Course Description: This seminar considers the use of the first person voice in a wide range of writings about art, from fiction to criticism to scholarship. Insofar as graduate students have typically been discouraged from using the first person voice in their scholarly work, we will question the benefits and drawbacks of doing so in particular cases. To what ends have different writers put the first person voice and how do they integrate it with others strategies of written expression? How might we distinguish among different forms of speaking from the position of ¿I¿ in art-historical writing? What kind of ¿I¿ is at stake¿personal, professional, intellectual, imaginary, or otherwise?nnRequirements: Students will be required to attend all seminar meetings and participate actively in discussion. They will submit two types of writing assignments: The first, which each student will prepare on a rotating basis, will be a 2-page response to a selected reading that will serve to launch discussion of that text in seminar. The second, longer paper (12-15 pages) will involve original research on a selected object or exhibition and the writing of a paper that adopts the first person voice to some degree or explains its necessary rejection.
Last offered: Winter 2020
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