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1 - 10 of 13 results for: Technology and National Security

CEE 130R: Racial Equity in Energy (CEE 330)

The built environment and the energy systems that meet its requirements is a product of decisions forged in a context of historical inequity produced by cultural, political, and economic forces expressed through decisions at individual and institutional levels. This interdisciplinary course will examine the imprint of systemic racial inequity in the U.S. that has produced a clean energy divide and a heritage of environmental injustice. Drawing on current events, students will also explore contemporary strategies that center equity in the quest for rapid technology transitions in the energy sector to address climate change, public health, national security, and community resilience. Prerequisites:By permission of the instructor. Preferable to have completed Understanding Energy ( CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103/ CEE 107S/207S) or a similar course at another institution if a graduate student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

CEE 330: Racial Equity in Energy (CEE 130R)

The built environment and the energy systems that meet its requirements is a product of decisions forged in a context of historical inequity produced by cultural, political, and economic forces expressed through decisions at individual and institutional levels. This interdisciplinary course will examine the imprint of systemic racial inequity in the U.S. that has produced a clean energy divide and a heritage of environmental injustice. Drawing on current events, students will also explore contemporary strategies that center equity in the quest for rapid technology transitions in the energy sector to address climate change, public health, national security, and community resilience. Prerequisites:By permission of the instructor. Preferable to have completed Understanding Energy ( CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103/ CEE 107S/207S) or a similar course at another institution if a graduate student.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3

INTLPOL 256: Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future (MS&E 193, MS&E 293)

Explores the relation between technology, war, and national security policy from early history to modern day, focusing on current U.S. national security challenges and the role that technology plays in shaping our understanding and response to these challenges. Topics include the interplay between technology and modes of warfare; dominant and emerging technologies such as nuclear weapons, cyber, sensors, stealth, and biological; security challenges to the U.S.; and the U.S. response and adaptation to new technologies of military significance.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

INTLPOL 259: Research Topics in Technology and National Security

Research on technology and national security, especially including but not limited to cyber conflict and information warfare, nuclear weapons, emerging technologies with relevance to national security. Student and faculty member will agree on one or more topics for research, and student will prepare a topic-relevant paper of approximately 4000 words per unit. A longer paper on one topic or two or three shorter papers on different topics are acceptable. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Lin, H. (PI)

INTLPOL 340: Technology, Innovation and Modern War: Keeping America's Edge in an Era of Great Power Competition (MS&E 296)

This course explores how technology advances in areas like Cyber, Space, AI, Machine Learning, and Autonomy will create new types of military systems that will be deployed in modern conflicts, and the new operational concepts, organization and strategies that will emerge from these technologies. The course develops an appreciation that innovation in military systems throughout history has followed a repeatable pattern: technology innovation > new weapons > experimentation with new weapons/operational concepts > pushback from incumbents > first use of new operational concepts. Students will apply course concepts and learning to identify opportunities for the U.S. to maintain its technological edge and compete more effectively in this era of great power rivalry. The course builds on concepts presented in MS&E 193/293: Technology and National Security and provides a strong foundation for MS&E 297: Hacking for Defense.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

INTLPOL 362: Data: Privacy, Property and Security

The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online m more »
The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online marketplace is no one's business but her own. B, the app that served as intermediary between the buyer and seller, may have a property or contract expectation that it owns the metadata and other information about A's buying habits. C, a government agency, may have a security interest in collecting or unearthing the details of A's purchase of particular items. This same triad of interests is implicated across a wide variety of highly sensitive personal data, such as location information, facial recognition and medical results. This seminar will explore these data rules, norms, technologies and conflicts through three sessions of lecture and interactive exercises addressed to privacy, property and security, respectively; four sessions devoted to presentations from leading representatives of consumer, corporate and government interests, with questioning by students in the class; and two sessions devoted to discussion of student answers to problem sets, focusing on an exploration of the privacy-property-security conflict and on forward-looking solutions to the protection of personal data. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, final research paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Non-law students will also need to submit the Non-Law Student Registration Information Form (Non-Law Student Registration Information). Cross-listed with LAW 4046.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807K: Policy Practicum: The Outlaw Ocean

Illegal fishing and forced labor aboard fishing vessels have long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. This policy lab confronts the global environmental and human rights challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing, supply chains, forced labor and human rights abuses to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a work of The Friends of Ocean Action -- convened by the World Economic Forum -- a coalition of public sector, private sector, and civil society leaders who are committed to accelerating action for more »
Illegal fishing and forced labor aboard fishing vessels have long plagued the world's oceans, undermining economic development, national security, food security, and human rights -- and nowhere is this more starkly evident than in the Pacific. From cans of tuna to shrimp cocktail, the legality of how seafood is caught and processed is often uncertain. This policy lab confronts the global environmental and human rights challenges associated with the existing framework of international laws and policies. The research delves into international laws that apply to the high seas, illegal fishing, supply chains, forced labor and human rights abuses to locate leverage points and explore innovative solutions, including how new technologies might be developed and deployed. The research contributes to a work of The Friends of Ocean Action -- convened by the World Economic Forum -- a coalition of public sector, private sector, and civil society leaders who are committed to accelerating action for sustainability. Solutions require cooperation among nations, international seafood companies, and nonprofit organizations, and the containment of rogue actors. In this policy lab, students will work with two clients. On illegal fishing, the client is Global Fishing Watch. Created through a collaboration among Google and other partners, Global Fishing Watch is a pioneer in harnessing satellite technology to enable better management of fisheries. On forced labor, the client is the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation, which brings together tuna processors who comprise more than 70% of the global market for canned tuna and is committed to developing solutions to address forced labor on fishing vessels in the tuna sector and beyond. Through the Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, students will also connect to a broad range of additional actors on these issues, including UN agencies, large seafood companies, and human rights and environmental NGOs. Students will produce policy briefs that will be published by the Center for Ocean Solutions. The practicum seeks law students, business students, and graduate and well-qualified undergraduates in such programs as earth systems, computer science, product design, public policy, sociology, and marine biology. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Class will meet meet on Wednesday, 9-11am, on Zoom in Autumn 2020. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 807R: Policy Practicum: Human Rights & International Justice

Atrocities continue to ravage our planet--in Syria, Iraq, Myanmar/Burma, North Korea, and Yemen, to name a few. And yet, the international community is increasingly divided when it comes to advancing the project of international justice. Whereas earlier armed conflicts have inspired the establishment of international or hybrid tribunals (such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone) or were referred to the International Criminal Court (such as the situations in Darfur and Libya), a pervasive tribunal fatigue and other geopolitical impasses have greeted today's armed conflicts and repressive regimes. The U.N. Security Council in particular has been hamstrung by the propensity of Russia, sometimes with China in tow, to veto (or threaten to veto) robust accountability proposals that have been put forward. States have been able to reach consensus only around the imperative of prosecuting terrorism and members of the so-called more »
Atrocities continue to ravage our planet--in Syria, Iraq, Myanmar/Burma, North Korea, and Yemen, to name a few. And yet, the international community is increasingly divided when it comes to advancing the project of international justice. Whereas earlier armed conflicts have inspired the establishment of international or hybrid tribunals (such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone) or were referred to the International Criminal Court (such as the situations in Darfur and Libya), a pervasive tribunal fatigue and other geopolitical impasses have greeted today's armed conflicts and repressive regimes. The U.N. Security Council in particular has been hamstrung by the propensity of Russia, sometimes with China in tow, to veto (or threaten to veto) robust accountability proposals that have been put forward. States have been able to reach consensus only around the imperative of prosecuting terrorism and members of the so-called Islamic State, including foreign fighters. As a result of these obstacles, advocates and their sovereign allies have looked to other organs and institutions within and without the United Nations to respond to the commission of international crimes. The General Assembly, the Human Rights Council, and even the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons have thus all become engines of accountability, in part because they are not subject to the pernicious veto. In addition, civil society actors (such as the Commission on International Justice & Accountability and the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization) have stepped up to undertake investigative functions that would ordinarily be performed by sovereign states or international prosecutors. A number of human rights law firms--such as the Center for Justice & Accountability and Accountability Counsel--are continuing to seek justice in U.S. courts and other fora under a suite of statutes that allow for civil redress for international law violations. And, a new breed of CS-for-Good organizations--such as Benetech and Hala Systems--are developing new technology tools to undergird accountability efforts, but need assistance with understanding the operative legal framework and evidentiary standards. This proposed lab will support several of these institutions in their effort to move justice processes forward. On the multilateral plane, confirmed partners/clients include the International Impartial Independent Mechanism for Syria (IIIM), established by the U.N. General Assembly; the United Nations Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da'esh/ISIL (UNITAD), established by the Security Council; and the Independent Investigative Mechanism for Myanmar (IIMM), established by the U.N. Human Rights Council. Domestically, the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice has the lead on the United States' transitional justice policy around the globe. It is increasingly beleaguered within the Department and the interagency as it attempts to advance U.S. support for human rights and accountability in the face of significant resistance. In addition, a number of civil society and non-governmental organizations are conducting thorough criminal investigations and forming detailed dossiers on potential perpetrators in an effort to jumpstart national proceedings, including those proceeding under extraordinary bases of jurisdiction; lay the groundwork for international prosecutions when--and if--an opening appears; and support multilateral and unilateral sanctions regimes, such as the United States' Global Magnitsky Act. Closer to home, organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are working with Black Lives Matter and other organizations to utilize United Nations and human rights treaty institutions to raise awareness about police violence and structural racism in the United States. This policy lab will be open to law students in the Fall and Winter quarters during academic year 2020-21. The application process will coincide with the Mills Legal Clinic registration process. Students can enroll in 3-6 units and receive Pathway B Experiential Learning credit towards graduation. Students enrolled in the lab will conduct both factual and legal research on behalf of partner organizations, participate in advocacy efforts aimed at advancing the imperative of accountability for grave international crimes, and generate concrete policy proposals for building a more robust international justice architecture. Work in the lab will expose students to a range of experiential learning opportunities to build and hone the following human rights lawyering and advocacy skills: 1. Interfacing (orally and in writing) with a range of influential civil society, governmental, and multilateral actors; 2. Assisting these organizations with strategic planning, problem solving, diplomatic outreach, and advocacy; 3. Conducting open source investigations on emergent atrocity situations around the world as well as historical events subject to contemporary accountability processes; 4. Conducting trauma-informed interviews with survivors; 5. Recognizing and helping to resolve ethical dilemmas that arise in a human rights practice (such as the tension between fealty to a client and advancing the movement); 6. Refining the information gathered for a range of transitional justice purposes; 7. Conducting traditional legal research and writing projects, including for briefs, human rights reports, proto-indictments, expert reports, and petitions to international human rights bodies; and 8. Practicing project and peer management and other professional skills. Along the way, students will be closely supervised and will receive constant, and stereoscopic, feedback from the instructor as well as from peers and mentors recruited from partner organizations. In addition to this client-facing work, the weekly seminar component of the lab will involve doctrinal instruction in the global human rights ecosystem, including human rights treaties (such as the International Convention on Civil & Political Rights), human rights institutions (such as the Committee Against Torture), international courts (such as the International Criminal Court), and U.N. mandate holders (such as the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention). Students will also have the opportunity to engage in a number of simulations and role plays to practice their human rights reasoning and lawyering skills. In addition to producing work product for clients and partner organizations, students will compose a series of reflection papers over the course of the quarter to capture their experience of developing their professional identity as a human rights lawyer/advocate. This integrated learning environment--which touches upon cognitive, practical, and ethical-social competencies--will enable student lawyers to wed their concrete experience with more abstract theory. Students will be graded on their participation and performance, their written work product, and their commitment to developing their professional skills (with partner organizations, clients, other stakeholders, and each other). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 12 units total)

LAW 4015: Modern Surveillance Law

This seminar provides an in depth look at modern government surveillance law, policies and practices. It is taught by Richard Salgado, director of law enforcement and information security at Google and a former prosecutor at the U.S. Department of Justice's Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section, and Todd Hinnen, a partner at Perkins Coie and a former head of U.S. Department of Justice's National Security Division. The course will cover the technology, law and policy of government surveillance of the Internet and other communications technologies. We will focus on U.S. government surveillance for national security, criminal law enforcement and public safety purposes, and its relationship with other jurisdictions. Technologies and practices covered will include wiretapping, stored data collection and mining, location tracking and developing eavesdropping techniques. Legal regimes will include the Fourth Amendment, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, the USA Freedom Act, USA Patriot Act, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the CLOUD Act and CALEA among others. Elements used in grading: Two papers, timely submission of topics and outlines, and class participation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

LAW 4046: Data: Privacy, Property and Security

The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online m more »
The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online marketplace is no one's business but her own. B, the app that served as intermediary between the buyer and seller, may have a property or contract expectation that it owns the metadata and other information about A's buying habits. C, a government agency, may have a security interest in collecting or unearthing the details of A's purchase of particular items. This same triad of interests is implicated across a wide variety of highly sensitive personal data, such as location information, facial recognition and medical results. This seminar will explore these data rules, norms, technologies and conflicts through three sessions of lecture and interactive exercises addressed to privacy, property and security, respectively; four sessions devoted to presentations from leading representatives of consumer, corporate and government interests, with questioning by students in the class; and two sessions devoted to discussion of student answers to problem sets, focusing on an exploration of the privacy-property-security conflict and on forward-looking solutions to the protection of personal data. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, research papers. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 362).
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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