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1 - 2 of 2 results for: POLISCI Political Mobilization

POLISCI 242G: Political Mobilization and Democratic Breakthroughs (INTLPOL 218, POLISCI 342G)

Mass political mobilization occurs in both democracies and autocracies. Sometimes political protests, demonstrations, and acts of nonviolence civic resistance undermine autocracies, produce democratic breakthroughs, or generate democratic reforms. Other times, they do not. This course explores why, first examining the original causes of mobilization, and then understanding why some movements succeed and others fail. The first sessions of the course will review theories of revolution, social movements, and democratization. The remainder of the course will do deep dives into case studies, sometime with guest lecturers and participants from these historical moments. Cases to be discussed will likely include the U.S. civil rights movement (1960s), Iran (1978 and 2009), Chile (1988), Eastern Europe (1989), China/Hong Kong (1989, 2011, 2019), USSR/Russia (1991 & 2011), South Africa (1990s), Serbia (2000), Egypt and Arab Spring (2011), Ukraine (2004 and 2013), and Black Lives Matter (2000s).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

POLISCI 342G: Political Mobilization and Democratic Breakthroughs (INTLPOL 218, POLISCI 242G)

Mass political mobilization occurs in both democracies and autocracies. Sometimes political protests, demonstrations, and acts of nonviolence civic resistance undermine autocracies, produce democratic breakthroughs, or generate democratic reforms. Other times, they do not. This course explores why, first examining the original causes of mobilization, and then understanding why some movements succeed and others fail. The first sessions of the course will review theories of revolution, social movements, and democratization. The remainder of the course will do deep dives into case studies, sometime with guest lecturers and participants from these historical moments. Cases to be discussed will likely include the U.S. civil rights movement (1960s), Iran (1978 and 2009), Chile (1988), Eastern Europe (1989), China/Hong Kong (1989, 2011, 2019), USSR/Russia (1991 & 2011), South Africa (1990s), Serbia (2000), Egypt and Arab Spring (2011), Ukraine (2004 and 2013), and Black Lives Matter (2000s).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
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