2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021 2021-2022
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 36 results for: PHIL 80

ETHICSOC 177K: On Domination (ETHICSOC 277K, PHIL 177K, PHIL 277K)

Domination is a morally problematic form of social power. To be dominated, according to republican political philosophy, is to be subject to the arbitrary or uncontrolled power of another. And to be free is the absence of domination. This view was the dominant political conception of freedom in the western political tradition until the rise of classical liberalism in the 19th century. In this course, we will examine different accounts of domination and freedom in the republican political tradition and critiques of non-domination as a political conception of freedom. We will also examine the contemporary revival of the republican view and its application to social relations ranging from the workplace to the family and beyond (prerequisite: PHIL 80).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

ETHICSOC 277K: On Domination (ETHICSOC 177K, PHIL 177K, PHIL 277K)

Domination is a morally problematic form of social power. To be dominated, according to republican political philosophy, is to be subject to the arbitrary or uncontrolled power of another. And to be free is the absence of domination. This view was the dominant political conception of freedom in the western political tradition until the rise of classical liberalism in the 19th century. In this course, we will examine different accounts of domination and freedom in the republican political tradition and critiques of non-domination as a political conception of freedom. We will also examine the contemporary revival of the republican view and its application to social relations ranging from the workplace to the family and beyond (prerequisite: PHIL 80).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

PHIL 80: Mind, Matter, and Meaning

We'll cover three central topics in philosophy: personal identity; the metaphysics of mind; and the nature of belief. Readings will be drawn both from philosophy and from cognitive science more broadly. This is an intensive writing course that satisfies the writing in the major requirement for both Philosophy and Symbolic Systems. Students will submit five papers over the course of the quarter, and receive constructive feedback on each. Prerequisite: at least one other philosophy course, not including SYMSYS 1 / PHIL 99.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

PHIL 107B: Plato's Later Metaphysics and Epistemology (PHIL 207B)

A close reading of Plato's Theatetus and Parmenides, his two mature dialogues on the topics of knowledge and reality. We will consider various definitions of knowledge, metaphysical problems about the objects of knowledge, and a proposed method for examining and resolving such problems. Some background in ancient Greek philosophy and/or contemporary metaphysics and epistemology is preferred, but not required. Prerequisite: Phil 80.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Code, A. (PI)

PHIL 160: What are Laws of Nature? (PHIL 260)

Scientists, and philosophers, regularly speak of the laws of nature: Newton's laws of motion or Avogadro's law. But what is a law of nature? Is it just a generalization that allows for exceptions? Is it just a summary statement of a pattern in events we have observed so far? Is talk of laws an indirect way of talking about the powers that objects and properties have? Or are laws somehow separate entities that make objects behave the way they do? Do they show us how things have to be, not just how they happen to be? Given what laws are supposed to be, are there really any laws of nature? Prerequisites: PHIL 80, PHIL 150 (or equivalent, and PHIL 180 (or equivalent).
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Hussain, N. (PI)

PHIL 167D: Philosophy of Neuroscience (PHIL 267D, SYMSYS 167D)

How can we explain the mind? With approaches ranging from computational models to cellular-level characterizations of neural responses to the characterization of behavior, neuroscience aims to explain how we see, think, decide, and even feel. While these approaches have been highly successful in answering some kinds of questions, they have resulted in surprisingly little progress in others. We'll look at the relationships between the neuroscientific enterprise, philosophical investigations of the nature of the mind, and our everyday experiences as creatures with minds. Prerequisite: PHIL 80.n(Not open to freshmen.)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Cao, R. (PI)

PHIL 173B: Undergraduate Introduction to Metaethics

This is an intensive, undergraduate-only introduction to, and survey of, contemporary metaethics. Can moral and ethical values be justified or is it just a matter of opinion? Is there a difference between facts and values? Are there any moral truths? Does it matter if there are not? Focus is not on which things or actions are valuable or morally right, but what is value or rightness itself. Prerequisites: 80, 181 and one ethics course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Hussain, N. (PI)

PHIL 175: Philosophy of Law (ETHICSOC 175B)

This course will explore foundational issues about the nature of law and its relation to morality, and about legal responsibility and criminal punishment. Toward the end we will turn to issues about the criminal culpability of children. nPrerequisite: Philosophy 80
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER, GER:DB-Hum

PHIL 177K: On Domination (ETHICSOC 177K, ETHICSOC 277K, PHIL 277K)

Domination is a morally problematic form of social power. To be dominated, according to republican political philosophy, is to be subject to the arbitrary or uncontrolled power of another. And to be free is the absence of domination. This view was the dominant political conception of freedom in the western political tradition until the rise of classical liberalism in the 19th century. In this course, we will examine different accounts of domination and freedom in the republican political tradition and critiques of non-domination as a political conception of freedom. We will also examine the contemporary revival of the republican view and its application to social relations ranging from the workplace to the family and beyond (prerequisite: PHIL 80).
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

PHIL 180: Metaphysics

This is an undergraduate only class. Intensive introduction to core topics in contemporary metaphysics. What is the fundamental structure of reality? Is it objective? How can there be truths about what is possible or necessary, if only the actual exists? Do we have free will? What is it for an event to be determined by its causes? Is the only thing that exists the current instance of time? Is the world purely physical? Does science answer all of these questions? If not, is there some other way to answer them? Prerequisites: PHIL 80, PHIL 150 (or equivalent), and PHIL 181 (or equivalent).
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hussain, N. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints