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1 - 10 of 10 results for: Nuclear Politics

EASTASN 94: The Rise of China in World Affairs (EASTASN 294)

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 189K: Politics, Economics, and Society of North Korea (EASTASN 289K)

The course will be a multidisciplinary approach to North Korea, using the fields of sociology, International Relations, history, and economics. The course will begin by exploring western media images of North Korea in order to establish its place in the global order. It will then look back at the process of decolonization and state formation in the 1940s and 1950s before looking at the contours of inter-Korean competition during the Cold War. The course will then turn to look at the contemporary nuclear and missile crisis as the defining feature of North Korea's international relations as well as the contemporaneous economic and social changes that have taken place during the last twenty years. There will be a particular focus on the Kim Jong Un era.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 289K: Politics, Economics, and Society of North Korea (EASTASN 189K)

The course will be a multidisciplinary approach to North Korea, using the fields of sociology, International Relations, history, and economics. The course will begin by exploring western media images of North Korea in order to establish its place in the global order. It will then look back at the process of decolonization and state formation in the 1940s and 1950s before looking at the contours of inter-Korean competition during the Cold War. The course will then turn to look at the contemporary nuclear and missile crisis as the defining feature of North Korea's international relations as well as the contemporaneous economic and social changes that have taken place during the last twenty years. There will be a particular focus on the Kim Jong Un era.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

EASTASN 294: The Rise of China in World Affairs (EASTASN 94)

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

POLISCI 101: Introduction to International Relations

The course provides an introduction to major factors shaping contemporary international politics, including: the origins and nature of nationalism; explanations for war; nuclear weapons and their impact of international politics; international implications of the rise of China; civil war and international peacekeeping since the end of the Cold War; understanding international institutions and how they facilitate interstate cooperation despite anarchy; and the politics of international environmental treaties.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 211N: Nuclear Politics (POLISCI 311N)

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? Have international and domestic views on nuclear weapons changed since 1945? In this course, we will first examine the political science literature on these key questions about nuclear politics. We will read and critique works using different approaches in political science including quantitative analysis, experiments, game theory, historical case studies, and mixed methods. Students will then design and execute small research projects to address questions that have been inadequately addressed in the existing literature.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 215F: Nuclear Weapons and International Politics (POLISCI 315F)

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? We will study the political science and history literature on these topics. Research paper required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

POLISCI 311N: Nuclear Politics (POLISCI 211N)

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? Have international and domestic views on nuclear weapons changed since 1945? In this course, we will first examine the political science literature on these key questions about nuclear politics. We will read and critique works using different approaches in political science including quantitative analysis, experiments, game theory, historical case studies, and mixed methods. Students will then design and execute small research projects to address questions that have been inadequately addressed in the existing literature.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Winter 2017 | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

POLISCI 315F: Nuclear Weapons and International Politics (POLISCI 215F)

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? We will study the political science and history literature on these topics. Research paper required.
Terms: not given this year, last offered Spring 2013 | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

STS 123: Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture

Nuclear technology has shaped our world through its various applications (e.g., weapons, energy production, medicine) and accidents and disasters (e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima). This course will examine the development of nuclear technology and its consequences to politics and culture at the global, national, regional and local levels from interdisciplinary perspectives. Some of the key questions addressed are: How did different countries and communities experience and respond to the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? How did such experiences affect the later development of the technology in different national contexts? How have nuclear tests and disasters change the ways in which risks are understood and managed globally and locally? What kinds of political activism, international arrangements, and cultural tropes and imageries emerged in response to nuclear technology? We explore these questions through key works and recent studies in history, anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies, as well as through films and literature.
Terms: Sum | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sato, K. (PI)
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