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1 - 4 of 4 results for: Music 141

ARTSINST 141: Network Performance Practice (MUSIC 153A)

JackTrip software, developed at Stanford, provides the means for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission for live music-making. Remote ensemble rehearsals, coaching, music lessons, jamming and concert broadcasting make use of the technology. The open-source project continues to develop, especially in its ability to support large ensembles of home-to-home connections. The course will cover recent features, history and theory of JackTrip and engage in a series of practical, participatory performance sessions. Students will learn the software and related network and audio principles with a focus on intuition building and ear training. Course participants will work from home and be able to use CCRMA facilities remotely. The course can be audited or coordinated with another course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 16 units total)
Instructors: Chafe, C. (PI)

COMPLIT 141: Songs of Love and Longing (COMPLIT 241B, MUSIC 183F, MUSIC 283F)

This course will take us on a journey from the Balkans to South Asia as we explore the nexus of poetry and song practiced by bards across a vast geographic and cultural space. Specifically, we will survey the Persianate genre of ghazal lyric, the storytelling traditions of Central Asia, the spiritual concert of certain Sufi orders, the mystical poems and music of Alevi ashiks in Turkey and the Balkans, the life and legend of Armenian poet-composer Sayat Nova, the spiritual practices of the Kurdish Ahl-e Haqq in Iran, the art forms of khyal and qawwali in India and Pakistan, and the syncretistic mysticism of the Bauls of Bengal. Students will engage in listening exercises, analysis of cinematic examples, and a comparison with the European troubadour tradition. There are no prerequisites for this course apart from a desire to engage with poetry as an existential performance. Taught in English.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

FEMGEN 141B: The Pen and the Sword (HISTORY 261P, ITALIAN 141)

As weapons, the pen and the sword have been used to wound, punish, and condemn as well as to protect, liberate, and elevate. Historically entangled with ideals of heroism, nobility, and civility, the pen and the sword have been the privileged instruments of men. Yet throughout history women have picked up the pen and the sword in defense, despair, and outrage as well as with passion, vision, and inspiration. This course is dedicated to them, and to study of works on love, sex, and power that articulate female experience. In our readings and seminars, we will encounter real and fictive women in their own words and in narrations and depictions by others from classical antiquity to the present, with a special focus on the Renaissance and on the twenty and twenty-first centuries. Touching on such topics as flattery and slander through the study of misogynistic, protofeminist, and feminist works in the early modern and modern periods in various European literary traditions, we will consider questions of truth and falsehood in fiction and in life. Course materials span a variety genres and media, from poetry, letters, dialogues, public lectures, treatises, short stories, and drama to painting, sculpture, music, and film ¿ works regarded for their aesthetic, intellectual, religious, social, and political value and impact.

ITALIAN 141: The Pen and the Sword (FEMGEN 141B, HISTORY 261P)

As weapons, the pen and the sword have been used to wound, punish, and condemn as well as to protect, liberate, and elevate. Historically entangled with ideals of heroism, nobility, and civility, the pen and the sword have been the privileged instruments of men. Yet throughout history women have picked up the pen and the sword in defense, despair, and outrage as well as with passion, vision, and inspiration. This course is dedicated to them, and to study of works on love, sex, and power that articulate female experience. In our readings and seminars, we will encounter real and fictive women in their own words and in narrations and depictions by others from classical antiquity to the present, with a special focus on the Renaissance and on the twenty and twenty-first centuries. Touching on such topics as flattery and slander through the study of misogynistic, protofeminist, and feminist works in the early modern and modern periods in various European literary traditions, we will consider questions of truth and falsehood in fiction and in life. Course materials span a variety genres and media, from poetry, letters, dialogues, public lectures, treatises, short stories, and drama to painting, sculpture, music, and film ¿ works regarded for their aesthetic, intellectual, religious, social, and political value and impact.
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