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1 - 9 of 9 results for: MED 234

BIOS 234: Personalized Genomic Medicine

Focuses on next-generation sequencing and its implications for personalized genomic medicine. Students gain hands-on experience with popular DNA sequence analysis tools as well as a practical understanding of the underlying algorithms and biomedicine.
Last offered: Spring 2016

DBIO 234: Elements of Grant Writing

Focus is on training first year graduate students in proposal writing. In an intensive 4-week period, students learn fundamental skills focused on scientific proposal writing, including writing and criticizing a proposal on the scientific topic of their choice. Students encouraged to use these new skills and the proposal they create to apply for external funding to support their research training. Students in the Genetics home program may enroll in this course with prior approval from the course director.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1
Instructors: Kim, S. (PI)

EMED 234: The Impact of Climate Change on Human Health (EMED 134)

Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing all subsequent generations of patients and physicians. This nweekly lunch seminar aims to introduce medical trainees to a variety of climate change topics and advanced clinical nskills specific to climate change. Course content will cover climate and disease, sustainable medicine, and advocacy. The course will feature speakers who are leaders in this emerging domain and patient perspectives of climate change. Each class session is designed to be interactive, with a mix of didactic lecture and small group discussion. Optional study materials will supplement each weekly topic for further study. Lunch provided for enrolled students.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit

GENE 234: Fundamentals of RNA Biology (MI 234, PATH 234)

For graduate or medical students and (if space allows) to active participants from other segments of the Stanford Community (e.g., TGR students); undergraduates by instructor consent. Fundamental issues of RNA biology, with the goal of setting a foundation for students to explore the expanding world of RNA-based regulation. Each week a topic is covered by a faculty lecture and journal club presentations by students.
Last offered: Autumn 2011

HRP 234: Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health (MED 254)

This course teaches engineering, operations research and modeling techniques to improve public health programs and systems. Students will engage in in-depth study of disease detection and control strategies from a "systems science" perspective, which involves the use of common engineering, operations research, and mathematical modeling techniques such as optimization, queuing theory, Markov and Kermack-McKendrick models, and microsimulation. Lectures and problem sets will focus on applying these techniques to classical public health dilemmas such as how to optimize screening programs, reduce waiting times for healthcare services, solve resource allocation problems, and compare macro-scale disease control strategies that cannot be easily evaluated through randomized trials. Readings will complement the lectures and problem sets by offering critical perspectives from the public health history, sociology, and epidemiology. In-depth case studies from non-governmental organizations, departm more »
This course teaches engineering, operations research and modeling techniques to improve public health programs and systems. Students will engage in in-depth study of disease detection and control strategies from a "systems science" perspective, which involves the use of common engineering, operations research, and mathematical modeling techniques such as optimization, queuing theory, Markov and Kermack-McKendrick models, and microsimulation. Lectures and problem sets will focus on applying these techniques to classical public health dilemmas such as how to optimize screening programs, reduce waiting times for healthcare services, solve resource allocation problems, and compare macro-scale disease control strategies that cannot be easily evaluated through randomized trials. Readings will complement the lectures and problem sets by offering critical perspectives from the public health history, sociology, and epidemiology. In-depth case studies from non-governmental organizations, departments of public health, and international agencies will drive the course. Prerequisites: A course in introductory statistics, and a course in multivariable calculus including ordinarily differential equations. Open to upper-division undergraduate students and graduate students. Human Biology majors enroll in HUMBIO 154A. Prerequisite: MATH 51 or CME 100 and Human Biology Core or Bio 141 or BioHopk 174H
Last offered: Autumn 2018

INDE 234: Introduction to Writing Research Proposals

Practical instruction in research proposal writing. Suitable for advanced graduate students. Substantial writing component. Enrollment by instructor approval only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

MI 234: Fundamentals of RNA Biology (GENE 234, PATH 234)

For graduate or medical students and (if space allows) to active participants from other segments of the Stanford Community (e.g., TGR students); undergraduates by instructor consent. Fundamental issues of RNA biology, with the goal of setting a foundation for students to explore the expanding world of RNA-based regulation. Each week a topic is covered by a faculty lecture and journal club presentations by students.
Last offered: Autumn 2011

PATH 234: Fundamentals of RNA Biology (GENE 234, MI 234)

For graduate or medical students and (if space allows) to active participants from other segments of the Stanford Community (e.g., TGR students); undergraduates by instructor consent. Fundamental issues of RNA biology, with the goal of setting a foundation for students to explore the expanding world of RNA-based regulation. Each week a topic is covered by a faculty lecture and journal club presentations by students.
Last offered: Autumn 2011

SURG 234: Service Through Surgery: Surgeons with an Impact

Surgeons with an Impact is a weekly lunch seminar course with guest lectures and facilitated workshops with the following objectives: 1) Participants will be able to understand the role of surgeons in addressing health inequities, social justice, and poverty, 2) Participants will be exposed to the potential of expert surgeons through lectures from diverse professionals, 3) Participants will reflect on how addressing inequities can align with their career goals in surgery. Health justice topics covered will include: surgery and global health, advocacy and trauma surgery, transplant justice, inequities in pediatric surgery, serving veterans through surgery, accessing surgical obstetrics and gynecology care, women in surgery, LGBTQ advocacy and surgery, and race and surgery; as well as diversity among surgeons themselves. Course open to MD and PA students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Lau, J. (PI)
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