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1 - 10 of 112 results for: HAAS::CEL

AFRICAAM 21: African American Vernacular English (CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 106: Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices (CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337)

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

AFRICAAM 130: Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms (CSRE 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322)

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Last offered: Autumn 2017

AFRICAAM 245: Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development (CSRE 245, EDUC 245, PSYCH 245A)

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials. Students will work with community partners to better understand the nuances of racial and ethnic identity development in different contexts. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

AFRICAST 142: Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice (AFRICAST 242, CSRE 142C, INTNLREL 142)

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

AMSTUD 150X: From Gold Rush to Google Bus: History of San Francisco (HISTORY 252E, URBANST 150)

This class will examine the history of San Francisco from Native American and colonial settlement through the present. Focus is on social, environmental, and political history, with the theme of power in the city. Topics include Native Americans, the Gold Rush, immigration and nativism, railroads and robber barons, earthquake and fire, progressive reform and unionism, gender, race and civil rights, sexuality and politics, counterculture, redevelopment and gentrification. Students write final project in collaboration with ShapingSF, a participatory community history project documenting and archiving overlooked stories and memories of San Francisco. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

CEE 177X: Engineering and Sustainable Development: Toolkit (CEE 277X, ENGR 177A, ENGR 277A)

The first of a two-quarter, project-based course sequence that address cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students work in interdisciplinary project teams to tackle real-world design challenges in partnership with social entrepreneurs and/or NGOs. While students must have the skills and aptitude necessary to make meaningful contributions to technical product designs, the course is open to all backgrounds and majors. The first quarter focuses on conceptual design, feasibility analysis, and implementation, evaluation, and deployment. Admission is by application. Following successful completion of CEE 177X/277X, students have the option to enroll in CEE 177S/277S Engineering & Sustainable Development: Implementation. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER | Repeatable for credit

CEE 224A: Design and Operation of Integrated Infrastructure Systems

In the next decade, countries will spend trillions of dollars on built infrastructure, the effect of which is to preserve our isolated infrastructure systems¿ status quo. Regulatory bodies like Public Utility Commissions (PUC) have unintentionally institutionalized this effect, with sometimes disastrous results, when in fact these isolated systems interact in ways that create new opportunities and new challenges. Infrastructure can be made more flexible and resilient but only when we know how to design, interconnect, and operate urban systems as an integrated whole, and when quality of life is the explicit motivation. These systems include Energy, Transportation, Communication, Water, Air, Green Space and Geophysical systems.nnThis class will introduce the basics of current infrastructure systems and explore in greater depth how these systems can be integrated in design and in operations. During the first half of the quarter, class lectures and guest speakers will develop the principle more »
In the next decade, countries will spend trillions of dollars on built infrastructure, the effect of which is to preserve our isolated infrastructure systems¿ status quo. Regulatory bodies like Public Utility Commissions (PUC) have unintentionally institutionalized this effect, with sometimes disastrous results, when in fact these isolated systems interact in ways that create new opportunities and new challenges. Infrastructure can be made more flexible and resilient but only when we know how to design, interconnect, and operate urban systems as an integrated whole, and when quality of life is the explicit motivation. These systems include Energy, Transportation, Communication, Water, Air, Green Space and Geophysical systems.nnThis class will introduce the basics of current infrastructure systems and explore in greater depth how these systems can be integrated in design and in operations. During the first half of the quarter, class lectures and guest speakers will develop the principles of infrastructure design and operations. The focus of the second half of the quarter will be directed student research to explore in greater detail the integration of two or more infrastructure systems, concluding with a written paper and class presentation.nnAt the end of this course students will have a framework for understanding integrated infrastructure design from multiple engineering and civic perspectives. Specific topics will be: n- Boundaries and boundary conditions between Built Urban Infrastructure Systems and Natural Urban infrastructure Systems n- Materials and Energy Flows between Built and Natural Urban Systemsn- Quantifying and Normalizing Urban Materials and Energy Flowsn- Basis of physical control of Infrastructure Systemsn- Basis of legal and economic control of Infrastructure systemsn- Metrics to evaluate single system and integrated system performancenStudents must submit an application for admission to this course: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfxTP9MWxbOMJOYXOA3kK1ZWAPJHCkptxaXfGQ80o0Nz7d6cA/viewform?usp=sf_link
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit

CEE 224X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 124X)

Note to students: please be advised that the course number for this course has been changed to: CEE 218X, which is offered Autumn 2019-20. If you are interested in taking this course, please enroll in CEE 218X instead for Autumn 2019-20.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CHILATST 177A: Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course (CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A)

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Schell, E. (PI)
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