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1 - 10 of 73 results for: GEOLSCI 1

GEOLSCI 1: Introduction to Geology (EARTHSYS 11)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Sperling, E. (PI)

GEOLSCI 2: Chemistry of the Earth and Planets

Chemistry of the Earth and PlanetsnCouse Description: Introduction to chemical principles with an emphasis on applications in the Earth Sciences. Topics include: origin and distribution of the elements in the solar system and on Earth, origin and structure of the Earth, its oceans and atmosphere, crystal chemistry, structure, and transformations, predicting and balancing reactions; thermodynamics, phase diagrams, high temperature and aqueous geochemistry, weathering, isotope geochemistry, and organic geochemistry. Students will also be exposed to analytical methods used in the Earth sciences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

GEOLSCI 4: Coevolution of Earth and Life (EARTHSYS 4)

Earth is the only planet in the universe currently known to harbor life. When and how did Earth become inhabited? How have biological activities altered the planet? How have environmental changes affected the evolution of life? Are we living in a sixth mass extinction? In this course, we will develop and use the tools of geology, paleontology, geochemistry, and modeling that allow us to reconstruct Earth's 4.5 billion year history and to reconstruct the interactions between life and its host planet over the past 4 billion years. We will also ask what this long history can tell us about life's likely future on Earth. We will also use One half-day field trip.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

GEOLSCI 5: Living on the Edge (EARTH 15)

A weekend field trip along the Pacific Coast. Tour local beaches, geology, and landforms with expert guides from the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. Enjoy a BBQ dinner and stay overnight in tents along the coast. Get to know faculty and graduate students in Stanford Earth. Transportation, meals, and camping equipment are provided at no cost to student participants. AY2020-21 offering is dependent on the COVID-19 health situation.
Terms: Sum | Units: 1

GEOLSCI 6: Data Science for Geoscience (EARTHSYS 100A)

This course provides an overview of the most relevant areas of data science to address geoscientific challenges and questions as they pertain to the environment, earth resources & hazards. The focus lies on the methods that treat common characters of geoscientific data: multivariate, multi-scale, compositional, geospatial and space-time. In addition, the course will treat those statistical method that allow a quantification of the human dimension by looking at quantifying impact on humans (e.g. hazards, contamination) and how humans impact the environment (e.g. contamination, land use). The course focuses on developing skills that are not covered in traditional statistics and machine learning courses.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)
Instructors: Caers, J. (PI)

GEOLSCI 30N: Science Fiction Worlds (GEOPHYS 30N)

Science fiction writers, with limited knowledge of what technologies or discoveries about space might exist in the future, must build entire worlds in their minds and craft underlying physical laws about how these fantastical places might operate and the types of environments that they could sustain. In this course, we will use popular works of science fiction from film, television, and literature as conversation starters to discuss real discoveries that have been made about how planets form and evolve over time. The class will focus on the following overarching questions: (1) What conditions are required for habitable planets to form? (2) What types of planets may actually exist, including desert worlds, lava planets, ice planets, and ocean worlds? (3) What kids of life could inhabit such diverse worlds? (3) What types of catastrophic events such as supernovas, asteroid impacts, climate changes can nurture or destroy planetary habitability?

GEOLSCI 38N: The Worst Journey in the World: The Science, Literature, and History of Polar Exploration (EARTHSYS 38N, ESS 38N)

This course examines the motivations and experiences of polar explorers under the harshest conditions on Earth, as well as the chronicles of their explorations and hardships, dating to the 1500s for the Arctic and the 1700s for the Antarctic. Materials include The Worst Journey in the World by Aspley Cherry-Garrard who in 1911 participated in a midwinter Antarctic sledging trip to recover emperor penguin eggs. Optional field trip into the high Sierra in March.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

GEOLSCI 42: Moving and Shaking in the Bay Area (EARTH 42)

Active faulting and erosion in the Bay Area, and its effects upon landscapes. Earth science concepts and skills through investigation of the valley, mountain, and coastal areas around Stanford. Faulting associated with the San Andreas Fault, coastal processes along the San Mateo coast, uplift of the mountains by plate tectonic processes, and landsliding in urban and mountainous areas. Field excursions; student projects.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Hilley, G. (PI)

GEOLSCI 45: Developing and maintaining a habitable Earth: A global challenge?

Did you ever wonder how we got here and where we are going? This course examines how the Earth became habitable for humans after 4.5 billion years of history and where we are headed as we continue to alter the Earth's livable environment. The Earth as we know it today is itself a highly tuned system of linked fluid (oceans and atmosphere) and solid (rock) envelopes that interact to maintain a highly hospitable environment for advanced life forms and civilization. From water to food to energy and mineral resources, we rely on our planet. Was this synergy always the case? Will it continue this way? We will explore how the Earth became habitable, specifically examining how those conditions arose and how they might change in the future, exploring what might happen when we perturb this system. How will the Earth respond and over what time scales? This course, taught by earth scientists who want to continue making our planet habitable for future generations, will also give you the hands on w more »
Did you ever wonder how we got here and where we are going? This course examines how the Earth became habitable for humans after 4.5 billion years of history and where we are headed as we continue to alter the Earth's livable environment. The Earth as we know it today is itself a highly tuned system of linked fluid (oceans and atmosphere) and solid (rock) envelopes that interact to maintain a highly hospitable environment for advanced life forms and civilization. From water to food to energy and mineral resources, we rely on our planet. Was this synergy always the case? Will it continue this way? We will explore how the Earth became habitable, specifically examining how those conditions arose and how they might change in the future, exploring what might happen when we perturb this system. How will the Earth respond and over what time scales? This course, taught by earth scientists who want to continue making our planet habitable for future generations, will also give you the hands on working knowledge of the Earth system and its evolution, and the tools and models we use to understand today's delicately balanced Earth system. It is our hope that at the end of this course you will have deep insights into your origins, your place in the universe, and how best to ensure that Earth remains our home.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)

GEOLSCI 105: Introduction to Field Methods

Two-week, field-based course in the White Mountains of eastern California. Introduction to the techniques for geologic mapping and geologic investigation in the field: systematic observations and data collection for lithologic columns and structural cross-sections. Interpretation of field relationships and data to determine the stratigraphic and deformational history of the region. Prerequisite: GEOLSCI 1, recommended: GEOLSCI 102.
Last offered: Spring 2019 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
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