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1 - 10 of 21 results for: EIPER::ms_sustainable-built

CEE 100: Managing Sustainable Building Projects

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 174B: Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

CEE 176B: 100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything (CEE 276B)

This course discusses elements of a transition to 100% clean, renewable energy in the electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industrial sectors for towns, cities, states, countries, and companies. It examines wind, solar, geothermal, hydroelectric, tidal, and wave characteristics and resources; electricity, heat, cold and hydrogen storage; transmission and distribution; matching power demand with supply on the grid: efficiency; replacing fossil with electric appliances and machines in the buildings and industry; energy, health, and climate costs and savings; land requirements; feedbacks of renewables to the atmosphere; and 100% clean, renewable energy roadmaps to guide transitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

CEE 207R: E^3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 107R)

Be part of a unique course about extreme energy efficiency and integrative design! We will meet remotely for once a week throughout the winter quarter. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, covering different energy themes throughout the quarter: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. The course will be composed of keynote lectures, exercises, and interactive puzzlers synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system more »
Be part of a unique course about extreme energy efficiency and integrative design! We will meet remotely for once a week throughout the winter quarter. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, covering different energy themes throughout the quarter: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. The course will be composed of keynote lectures, exercises, and interactive puzzlers synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), and Dr. Holmes Hummel, founder of Clean Energy Works. Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to enroll. There is no application this year. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses or their equivalent is required: CEE 107A/207A/ Earthsys 103, CEE 107S/ CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Course details are available at the website: https://energy.stanford.edu/extreme-energy-efficiency
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 218X: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 118X, ESS 118X, ESS 218X, GEOLSCI 118X, GEOLSCI 218X, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, POLISCI 218X, PUBLPOL 118X, PUBLPOL 218X)

The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to more »
The complex urban problems affecting quality of life in the Bay Area, from housing affordability and transportation congestion to economic vitality and social justice, are already perceived by many to be intractable, and will likely be exacerbated by climate change and other emerging environmental and technological forces. Changing urban systems to improve the equity, resilience and sustainability of communities will require new collaborative methods of assessment, goal setting, and problem solving across governments, markets, and communities. It will also require academic institutions to develop new models of co-production of knowledge across research, education, and practice. This XYZ course series is designed to immerse students in co-production for social change. The course sequence covers scientific research and ethical reasoning, skillsets in data-driven and qualitative analysis, and practical experience working with local partners on urban challenges that can empower students to drive responsible systems change in their future careers. The Autumn (X) course is specifically focused on concepts and skills, and completion is a prerequisite for participation in the Winter (Y) and/or Spring (Z) practicum quarters, which engage teams in real-world projects with Bay Area local governments or community groups. X is composed of four modules: (A) participation in two weekly classes which prominently feature experts in research and practice related to urban systems; (B) reading and writing assignments designed to deepen thinking on class topics; (C) fundamental data analysis skills, particularly focused on Excel and ArcGIS, taught in lab sessions through basic exercises; (D) advanced data analysis skills, particularly focused on geocomputation in R, taught through longer and more intensive assignments. X can be taken for 3 units (ABC), 4 units (ACD), or 5 units (ABCD). Open to undergraduate and graduate students in any major. For more information, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 226E: Techniques and Methods for Decarbonized and Energy Efficient Building Design

This class explores innovative methods for designing, developing, and financing zero carbon and zero energy buildings. At this pivotal moment, as building codes in California and around the world move towards decarbonization and all electric buildings, this class will ideally position students to enter the field of the built environment with the tools to tackle the quickly changing industry. Students will learn best practices to reduce energy and integrate solar PV generation and battery energy storage in commercial buildings in pursuit of Net Zero Energy and Net Zero Carbon buildings. The class is taught by Peter Rumsey, a widely recognized global leader in energy efficiency and sustainable building design. Lectures include presentations and panels featuring foremost experts and practitioners in the field of green buildings. Optional site visits to the Bay Area's most notable decarbonized and green buildings. CEE 176A and CEE 156/256 or similar courses are recommended prerequisites. more »
This class explores innovative methods for designing, developing, and financing zero carbon and zero energy buildings. At this pivotal moment, as building codes in California and around the world move towards decarbonization and all electric buildings, this class will ideally position students to enter the field of the built environment with the tools to tackle the quickly changing industry. Students will learn best practices to reduce energy and integrate solar PV generation and battery energy storage in commercial buildings in pursuit of Net Zero Energy and Net Zero Carbon buildings. The class is taught by Peter Rumsey, a widely recognized global leader in energy efficiency and sustainable building design. Lectures include presentations and panels featuring foremost experts and practitioners in the field of green buildings. Optional site visits to the Bay Area's most notable decarbonized and green buildings. CEE 176A and CEE 156/256 or similar courses are recommended prerequisites. All students participate in a group-based, term project focused on the design of a Net Zero Carbon building. Topics covered in this course include: understanding the importance of building envelopes in a successful design, designing a heating system without natural gas, calculating building energy use, optimizing daylighting and electrical lighting, reducing plug load power use, quantifying embodied and lifetime operating carbon emissions from buildings, sizing photovoltaic and battery storage systems, and financing energy efficiency, PV, and battery systems.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

CEE 236: Planning Calif: the Intersection of Climate, Land Use, Transportation & the Economy (CEE 136, PUBLPOL 130, PUBLPOL 230, URBANST 130)

Cities and urban areas have always been transformed by major external changes like pandemics and public health crises. California is both in the midst of its greatest economic recession since the Great Depression and experiencing a pandemic that has the potential to reshape many aspects of life. Planning for cities and regions, however, is a long game that requires follow-through on decisions made sometimes over many decades. How do we balance the shocks to our assumptions from the current Covid world with the need to plan long-term for issues like affordable housing and equitable cities, and perhaps most fundamentally, prepare our cities and communities for the inevitability of climate change and climate impact? nnnnThis course takes an interdisciplinary view of the key contemporary planning topics in California. It does so from looking at the intersection of climate laws, land use changes, the need for housing, travel patterns and the availability of high quality jobs and employment. more »
Cities and urban areas have always been transformed by major external changes like pandemics and public health crises. California is both in the midst of its greatest economic recession since the Great Depression and experiencing a pandemic that has the potential to reshape many aspects of life. Planning for cities and regions, however, is a long game that requires follow-through on decisions made sometimes over many decades. How do we balance the shocks to our assumptions from the current Covid world with the need to plan long-term for issues like affordable housing and equitable cities, and perhaps most fundamentally, prepare our cities and communities for the inevitability of climate change and climate impact? nnnnThis course takes an interdisciplinary view of the key contemporary planning topics in California. It does so from looking at the intersection of climate laws, land use changes, the need for housing, travel patterns and the availability of high quality jobs and employment. This course will give you an understanding of the roles of key levels of government, from the state to the region/metropolitan scale, to the city and county, down to the neighborhood and parcel level. it will give students insight into leading themes and issues of the day in California such as the future of downtowns, the role of high speed rail, the impact of telework, automation in the construction of housing, drawing from examples in San Jose and San Francisco, the Central Valley, the state legislature, Southern California. Within each of these topics we will look at the impact of decisions on equity as well as climate and the economy. nnnnThe instructors are Kristy Wang, formerly SPUR¿s Community Planning Policy Director, and Egon Terplan, Senior Advisor for Economic Development and Transportation in the California Governor¿s Office, formerly SPUR¿s Regional Planning Director. (Affiliations for identification purposes only)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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