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1 - 10 of 24 results for: EIPER::ms_health

ANTHRO 266: Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness (ANTHRO 166)

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?
Last offered: Winter 2020

ANTHRO 282: Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A)

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 5
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

BIO 117: Biology and Global Change (EARTHSYS 111, EARTHSYS 217, ESS 111)

The biological causes and consequences of anthropogenic and natural changes in the atmosphere, oceans, and terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Topics: glacial cycles and marine circulation, greenhouse gases and climate change, tropical deforestation and species extinctions, and human population growth and resource use. Prerequisite: Biology or Human Biology core or BIO 81 or graduate standing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

BIO 238: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, EARTHSYS 139, EARTHSYS 239)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins and then a primary focus on its recent development and frontiers. The principal aim of the course is to enable new research and real-world applications of InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) tools and approaches. We will discuss the interconnections between people and nature and key research frontiers, such as in the realms of biodiversity, resilience, human health, poverty alleviation, and sustainable development. The science we¿ll explore is in the service of decisions, and we will use examples from real life to illustrate why this science is so critical to informing why, where, how, and how much people need nature. Prerequisite. Basic to intermediate GIS skills are required (including working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading and editing rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; understanding coordinate systems; and performing basic raster math).
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 174B: Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 260C: Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport (ESS 221)

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 263A: Air Pollution Modeling

The numerical modeling of urban, regional, and global air pollution focusing on gas chemistry and radiative transfer. Stratospheric, free-tropospheric, and urban chemistry. Methods for solving stiff systems of chemical ordinary differential, including the multistep implicit-explicit method, Gear's method with sparse-matrix techniques, and the family method. Numerical methods of solving radiative transfer, coagulation, condensation, and chemical equilibrium problems. Project involves developing a basic chemical ordinary differential equation solver. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Last offered: Spring 2018

CEE 263D: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 64)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Last offered: Winter 2020
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