2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

1 - 10 of 22 results for: EIPER::ms_freshwater

BIO 238: Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature (BIO 138, EARTHSYS 139, EARTHSYS 239)

This course explores the science of valuing nature, beginning with its historical origins and then a primary focus on its recent development and frontiers. The principal aim of the course is to enable new research and real-world applications of InVEST (Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs) tools and approaches. We will discuss the interconnections between people and nature and key research frontiers, such as in the realms of biodiversity, resilience, human health, poverty alleviation, and sustainable development. The science we¿ll explore is in the service of decisions, and we will use examples from real life to illustrate why this science is so critical to informing why, where, how, and how much people need nature. Prerequisite. Basic to intermediate GIS skills are required (including working with raster, vector and tabular data; loading and editing rasters, shapefiles, and tables into a GIS; understanding coordinate systems; and performing basic raster math).
Last offered: Autumn 2019

CEE 101B: Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

CEE 174A: Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/M.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 174B: Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitch, W. (PI)

CEE 177: Aquatic Chemistry and Biology

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Criddle, C. (PI)

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 260A: Physical Hydrogeology (ESS 220)

(Formerly GES 230.) Theory of underground water occurrence and flow, analysis of field data and aquifer tests, geologic groundwater environments, solution of field problems, and groundwater modeling. Introduction to groundwater contaminant transport and unsaturated flow. Lab. Prerequisite: elementary calculus.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4

CEE 260C: Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport (ESS 221)

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 262A: Hydrodynamics

The flow of incompressible viscous fluid; emphasis is on developing an understanding of fluid dynamics that can be applied to environmental flows. Topics: kinematics of fluid flow; equations of mass and momentum conservation (including density variations); some exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations; appropriate analysis of fluid flows including Stokes flows, potential flows, and laminar boundary layers; and an introduction to the effects of rotation and stratification through scaling analysis of fluid flows. Prerequisites: 101B or consent of instructor; and some knowledge of vector calculus and differential equations.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CEE 262B: Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows

Application of fluid mechanics to problems of pollutant transport and mixing in the water environment. Mathematical models of advection, diffusion, and dispersion. Application of theory to problems of transport and mixing in rivers, estuaries, and lakes and reservoirs. Recommended: 262A and CME 102 (formerly ENGR 155A), or equivalents.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints