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1 - 10 of 24 results for: EIPER::ms_cleantech

APPPHYS 219: Solid State Physics Problems in Energy Technology

Technology issues for a secure energy future; role of solid state physics in energy technologies. Topics include the physics principles behind future technologies related to solar energy and solar cells, solid state lighting, superconductivity, solid state fuel cells and batteries, electrical energy storage, materials under extreme condition, nanomaterials.
Last offered: Spring 2017

BIOE 355: Advanced Biochemical Engineering (CHEMENG 355)

Combines biological knowledge and methods with quantitative engineering principles. Quantitative review of biochemistry and metabolism; recombinant DNA technology and synthetic biology (metabolic engineering). The production of protein pharaceuticals as a paradigm for the application of chemical engineering principles to advanced process development within the framework of current business and regulatory requirements. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41, or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 176A: Energy Efficient Buildings

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

CEE 176B: 100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything (CEE 276B)

This course discusses elements of a transition to 100% clean, renewable energy in the electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, and industrial sectors for towns, cities, states, countries, and companies. It examines wind, solar, geothermal, hydroelectric, tidal, and wave characteristics and resources; electricity, heat, cold and hydrogen storage; transmission and distribution; matching power demand with supply on the grid: efficiency; replacing fossil with electric appliances and machines in the buildings and industry; energy, health, and climate costs and savings; land requirements; feedbacks of renewables to the atmosphere; and 100% clean, renewable energy roadmaps to guide transitions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 207A: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, virtual field trips, and a small-group discussion section once a week for 50 minutes (live participation is required, many different times will be offered). Lectures will be recorded and available on Canvas. No in-person field trips will be offered for AY 2020-2021 ¿ but alumni of the class can optionally attend field trips in future quarters. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5

CEE 207R: E^3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 107R)

Be part of a unique course about extreme energy efficiency and integrative design! We will meet remotely for once a week throughout the winter quarter. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, covering different energy themes throughout the quarter: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. The course will be composed of keynote lectures, exercises, and interactive puzzlers synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system more »
Be part of a unique course about extreme energy efficiency and integrative design! We will meet remotely for once a week throughout the winter quarter. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, covering different energy themes throughout the quarter: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. The course will be composed of keynote lectures, exercises, and interactive puzzlers synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), and Dr. Holmes Hummel, founder of Clean Energy Works. Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to enroll. There is no application this year. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses or their equivalent is required: CEE 107A/207A/ Earthsys 103, CEE 107S/ CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Course details are available at the website: https://energy.stanford.edu/extreme-energy-efficiency
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 226: Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Lepech, M. (PI)

CEE 272R: Modern Power Systems Engineering

Focus is on Power Engineering from a systems point of view. Topics covered may include modeling of generation, transmission and distribution systems, load flow analysis, transient and steady-state stability analysis. Special emphasis given to modern market operations and dispatch, modeling intermittent controllable power sources, storage technologies, mechanisms for demand response, sensing the grid and the role of market mechanisms for deep integration. Course content may vary year to year.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 274A: Environmental Microbiology I (BIO 273A, CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274)

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, CHEM 121 (formerly CHEM 35), and BIOSCI 83, CHEMENG 181, or equivalents.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

CEE 274B: Microbial Bioenergy Systems (BIO 273B, CHEMENG 456)

Introduction to microbial metabolic pathways and to the pathway logic with a special focus on microbial bioenergy systems. The first part of the course emphasizes the metabolic and biochemical principles of pathways, whereas the second part is more specifically directed toward using this knowledge to understand existing systems and to design innovative microbial bioenergy systems for biofuel, biorefinery, and environmental applications. There also is an emphasis on the implications of rerouting of energy and reducing equivalents for the fitness and ecology of the organism. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 174 or 181 and organic chemistry, or equivalents.
Last offered: Winter 2020
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