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1 - 10 of 13 results for: CS 147

CS 147: Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design

Introduces fundamental methods and principles for designing, implementing, and evaluating user interfaces. Topics: user-centered design, rapid prototyping, experimentation, direct manipulation, cognitive principles, visual design, social software, software tools. Learn by doing: work with a team on a quarter-long design project, supported by lectures, readings, and studios. Prerequisite: 106B or X or equivalent programming experience. Recommended that CS Majors have also taken one of 142, 193P, or 193A.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 194H: User Interface Design Project

Advanced methods for designing, prototyping, and evaluating user interfaces to computing applications. Novel interface technology, advanced interface design methods, and prototyping tools. Substantial, quarter-long course project that will be presented in a public presentation. Prerequisites: CS 147, or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Landay, J. (PI)

CS 247A: Design for Artificial Intelligence

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247A is design for human-centered artificial intelligence experiences. What does it mean to design for AI? What is HAI? Let¿s explore what AI actually is and the constraints, opportunities and specialized processes necessary to create AI systems that work effectively for the humans involved. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background in design thinking.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Stanford, J. (PI)

CS 247G: Introduction to Game Design

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; please plan on attending every studio to take this class. nThe focus of CS247g is an introduction to theory and practice of the design of games. We will make digital and paper games, do rapid iteration and run user research studies appropriate to game design. This class has multiple short projects, allowing us to cover a variety of genres, from narrative to pure strategy. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Wodtke, C. (PI)

CS 247I: Design for Understanding

Complex problems require sophisticated approaches. In this project-based hands-on course, students explore the design of systems, information and interface for human use. We will model the flow of interactions, data and context, and crafting a design that is useful, appropriate and robust. Students will create utility apps or games as a response to the challenges presented. We will also examine the ethical consequences of design decisions and explore current issues arising from unintended consequences. Prerequisite: CS 147 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Wodtke, C. (PI)

CS 247S: Service Design

A project-based course that builds on the introduction to design in CS147 by focusing on advanced methods and tools for research, prototyping, and user interface design. Studio based format with intensive coaching and iteration to prepare students for tackling real world design problems. This course takes place entirely in studios; you must plan on attending every studio to take this class. The focus of CS247S is Service Design. In this course we will be looking at experiences that address the needs of multiple types of stakeholders at different touchpoints - digital, physical, and everything in between. If you¿ve ever taken an Uber, participated in the Draw, engaged with your bank, or ordered a coffee through the Starbucks app¿you¿ve experienced a service that must have a coordinated experience for the customer, the service provider, and any other stakeholders involved. Let¿s explore what specialized tools and processes are required to created these multi-faceted interactions. Prerequisites: 147 or equivalent background in design thinking.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Stanford, J. (PI)

CS 294H: Research Project in Human-Computer Interaction

Student teams under faculty supervision work on research and implementationnof a large project in HCI. State-of-the-art methods related to the problemndomain. Prerequisites CS 377, 147, 247, or permission from instructor.
Last offered: Winter 2010

CS 347: Human-Computer Interaction Research

(Previously numbered CS 376.) Prepares students to conduct original HCI research by reading and discussing seminal and cutting-edge research papers. Main topics are interaction, social computing, and design; breadth topics include AI+HCI, media tools, access, programming tools, and visualization. Student groups perform a quarter-long research project. Prerequisites: For CS and Symbolic Systems undergraduates/masters students, CS 147 or CS 247. No prerequisite for PhD students or students outside of CS and Symbolic Systems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit

CS 377J: Designing Systems for Collaboration, Cooperation, and Collective Action

This project-based class focuses on the design of systems that support large groups to collaborate, cooperate, and act together. A large body of research in Human-Computer Interaction and Computer Supported Cooperative Work is devoted to the design of systems that assist large groups to come together and aggregate their efforts, whether in the form of information, code, or people power. Examples of these sociotechnical systems include Wikipedia, Facebook groups, and Change.org. Students will read papers in the HCI literature and participate in discussions that analyze the design of these systems, the various stakeholders, and how the systems play out in the real world. Prerequisites: CS 147; CS 376 recommended but not required.

CS 377P: Advanced User Interface Design Patterns

User interface design is about creating the most effective, intuitive design possible to help users achieve a specific goal. While understanding users is one part of the equation, the other part is a strong understanding of user interface design rules and patterns that you can apply to solve their needs. This course will deep dive into user interface design across mobile, desktop, and wearable platforms covering common patterns, when to use them, and when to break them. Each week will cover a different user interface design challenge and explore the patterns in areas such as data input, search & filters, tables and lists, content organization, navigation, dark patterns and more. Through the use of in class exercises, integrated design challenges, and an exploration of examples, students will leave the class knowing how to integrate user interface patterns into their design work to create powerful, effective digital experiences. Prerequisite: CS 147 or equivalent. 247 recommended but not required.
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