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1 - 10 of 15 results for: BMC::cellmol

APPPHYS 294: Cellular Biophysics (BIO 294, BIOPHYS 294)

Physical biology of dynamical and mechanical processes in cells. Emphasis is on qualitative understanding of biological functions through quantitative analysis and simple mathematical models. Sensory transduction, signaling, adaptation, switches, molecular motors, actin and microtubules, motility, and circadian clocks. Prerequisites: differential equations and introductory statistical mechanics.
Last offered: Autumn 2019

BIO 104: Advance Molecular Biology: Epigenetics and Proteostasis (BIO 200)

Molecular mechanisms that govern the replication, recombination, and expression of eukaryotic genomes. Topics: DNA replication, DNA recombination, gene transcription, RNA splicing, regulation of gene expression, protein synthesis, and protein folding. Prerequisite: Biology core or BIO 83 ( BIO 82 and 86 are strongly recommended).
Last offered: Winter 2019 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci

BIO 214: Advanced Cell Biology (BIOC 224, MCP 221)

For Ph.D. students. Taught from the current literature on cell structure, function, and dynamics. Topics include complex cell phenomena such as cell division, apoptosis, signaling, compartmentalization, transport and trafficking, motility and adhesion, and differentiation. Weekly reading of current papers from the primary literature. Advanced undergraduates may participate with the permission of the Course Director.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIO 230: Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Terms: Aut | Units: 4

BIOC 241: Biological Macromolecules (BIOE 241, BIOPHYS 241, SBIO 241)

The physical and chemical basis of macromolecular function. Topics include: forces that stabilize macromolecular structure and their complexes; thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of macromolecular folding, binding, and allostery; diffusional processes; kinetics of enzymatic processes; the relationship of these principles to practical application in experimental design and interpretation. The class emphasizes interactive learning, and is divided among lectures, in-class group problem solving, and discussion of current and classical literature. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisites: Background in biochemistry and physical chemistry recommended but material available for those with deficiency in these areas; undergraduates with consent of instructor only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Das, R. (PI)

BIOE 222: Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects (RAD 222)

Physics and Engineering Principles of Multi-modality Molecular Imaging of Living Subjects ( RAD 222A). Focuses on instruments, algorithms and other technologies for non-invasive imaging of molecular processes in living subjects. Introduces research and clinical molecular imaging modalities, including PET, SPECT, MRI, Ultrasound, Optics, and Photoacoustics. For each modality, lectures cover the basics of the origin and properties of imaging signal generation, instrumentation physics and engineering of signal detection, signal processing, image reconstruction, image data quantification, applications of machine learning, and applications of molecular imaging in medicine and biology research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4

CHEM 141: The Chemical Principles of Life I

This is the first course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will examine biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisites: CHEM 121, MATH 21 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

CHEM 143: The Chemical Principles of Life II

(Not offered in AY2020-21) This is the second course in a two-quarter sequence ( Chem 141/143), which will continue the discussion of biological science through the lens of chemistry. In this sequence students will gain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the molecular logic of cellular processes, which include expression and transmission of the genetic code, enzyme kinetics, biosynthesis, energy storage and consumption, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Connections to foundational principles of chemistry will be made through structure-function analyses of biological molecules. Integrated lessons in structural, mechanistic, and physical chemistry will underscore how molecular science and molecular innovation have impacted biology and medicine. Prerequisite: Chem 141.
Last offered: Spring 2020

CHEM 171: Foundations of Physical Chemistry

Quantum and statistical thermodynamics: obtaining quantum mechanical energy levels and connecting them to thermodynamic properties using statistical mechanics. Emphasis will be on quantum mechanics of ideal systems (e.g. particle in a box, particle in a ring, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom) and their connection to and uses in thermodynamics (laws of thermodynamics, properties of gases, chemical equilibria, thermal motion and energy barriers, and rates of chemical reactions). Homeworks and discussion sections will employ the Python programming language for hands-on experience with simulating chemical systems. Prerequisites: CHEM 33; PHYS 41; CS106A; either MATH 51 or CME 100.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci
Instructors: Markland, T. (PI)

CHEMENG 150: Biochemical Engineering (BIOE 150, CHEMENG 250)

Systems-level combination of chemical engineering concepts with biological principles. The production of protein pharmaceuticals as a paradigm to explore quantitative biochemistry and cellular physiology, the elemental stoichiometry of metabolism, recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, fermentation development and control, product isolation and purification, protein folding and formulation, and biobusiness and regulatory issues. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
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