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AFRICAAM 18A: Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940 (MUSIC 18A)

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Low, M. (PI)

AFRICAAM 20A: Jazz Theory (MUSIC 20A)

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: Music 19, consent of instructor, or satisfactory demonstration of basic musical skills proficiency on qualifying examination on first day of class. This class is closed by design. Please register on the waitlist and show up on the first day of class to receive a permission number for enrollment.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Nadel, J. (PI)

AFRICAAM 37: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads 'Weather Simulator' Performance Project (DANCE 30)

An interdisciplinary project-based class to develop dance technique, collaborative choreography, and associated visual and musical arts. We invite dancers, movers, and emerging creators of all styles and backgrounds. The Autumn 22-23 project will focus on creating a "weather simulator" as a vehicle to explore the relationship between weather and human social life. We will use improvisational scores, meteorological data, gaming and machine learning strategies to both become weather and respond to weather. Through this poetic simulator, we will devise a collective way of thinking about our survival and our creative agency. How does weather change our way of being? How is the weather affected by human behavior on earth? In an unpredictable world of climate catastrophes, how can our simulator inspire hope through collective imagination grounded in science? The Chocolate Heads will continue the practice of creating intermedia performances using dance, film projection, technology, and live music. We are seeking interdisciplinary artists in dance, poetry, music, graphics, video and AI. All levels of experience are welcome. WEEK 1: TU 9/27--Introduction to the Project & CHs Band; THU 9/29--1st Audition Workshop. Contact Instructor (Aleta Hayes, ahayes1@stanford.edu) for more information.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 45: Dance Improvisation from Freestyle to Hip Hop (DANCE 45)

In this dance improvisation class, we will develop techniques and practices to cultivate an improvisational practice in dance and domains beyond. This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers and to promote collaborative and interactive intelligence. We will draw upon dance styles and gestural vocabularies, including contemporary dance, hip-hop, vogue and more. Students will learn how to apply these improvisational dance ideas to generate and innovate across disciplines. Accompanied by a live DJ, students will practice listening with eyes, ears, and our whole bodies. Open to students from all dance, movement, and athletic backgrounds. Beginners welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Hayes, A. (PI)

AFRICAAM 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143)

This course provides students with an introductory survey of literature and cinema from Francophone Africa and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will be encouraged to consider the geographical, historical, and political connections between the Maghreb, the Caribbean, and Sub-Saharan Africa. This course will help students improve their ability to speak and write in French by introducing students to linguistic and conceptual tools to conduct literary and visual analysis. While analyzing novels and films, students will be exposed to a diverse number of topics such as national and cultural identity, race and class, gender and sexuality, orality and textuality, transnationalism and migration, colonialism and decolonization, history and memory, and the politics of language. Readings include the works of writers and filmmakers such as Aimé Césaire, Albert Memmi, Ousmane Sembène, Leïla Sebbar, Mariama Bâ, Maryse Condé, Dany Laferrière, Mati Diop, and special guest Léonora Miano. Taught in French. Students are encouraged to complete FRENLANG 124 or successfully test above this level through the Language Center.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP
Instructors: Seck, F. (PI)

AFRICAAM 156: Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson (CSRE 156T, TAPS 156, TAPS 356)

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Last offered: Winter 2018 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-EDP

AFRICAAM 159: James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature (AMSTUD 159, ENGLISH 159, FEMGEN 159)

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.NOTE: Enrollment by department consent. To apply, please email Prof. Elam (melam@stanford.edu) with your name, year, major, and one sentence about why you would like to take this class.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-EDP

AFRICAAM 163: Fly Folk in the Buttermilk: A Black Music and Culture Writing Workshop (CSRE 163, MUSIC 153C)

This course in honor of the late, great music journalist and thinker, Greg Tate, is designed to introduce popular music writing as a genre to students from all academic backgrounds. From cultural criticism, liner notes, music journalism, and DJ scholarship and more - this course explores the art of music writing with lectures, discussion and ongoing feedback on student writing from Special Guest Artists DJ Lynnée Denise and Daniel Gray-Kontar. Students will also have the opportunity to read and analyze various types of music writing in public and scholarly venues, and if they choose, to build a portfolio of their own working across several possible genres. Nationally and internationally renowned guests will visit with the class regularly to share their journeys as writers and offer their views on craft, aesthetics, and principles for writers to consider as they work on their own craft. These guests will include: Cheo Hodari Coker, journalist at The Source Magazine turned television/fil more »
This course in honor of the late, great music journalist and thinker, Greg Tate, is designed to introduce popular music writing as a genre to students from all academic backgrounds. From cultural criticism, liner notes, music journalism, and DJ scholarship and more - this course explores the art of music writing with lectures, discussion and ongoing feedback on student writing from Special Guest Artists DJ Lynnée Denise and Daniel Gray-Kontar. Students will also have the opportunity to read and analyze various types of music writing in public and scholarly venues, and if they choose, to build a portfolio of their own working across several possible genres. Nationally and internationally renowned guests will visit with the class regularly to share their journeys as writers and offer their views on craft, aesthetics, and principles for writers to consider as they work on their own craft. These guests will include: Cheo Hodari Coker, journalist at The Source Magazine turned television/film writer of Creed II; Joan Morgan, long-time music and culture writer who coined the phrase Hip-Hop Feminism; Fredara Hadley, ethnomusicology professor at The Juilliard School; Scott Poulsen Bryant, co-founding editor of Vibe Magazine, and others. This spring course is presented by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts, IDA.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4

AFRICAAM 173: Still Waters Run Deep, Troubling The Archive with filmmaking and photography (CSRE 173)

Using lens-based filmmaking and photography as a form of storytelling, students will create individual projects that explore their own family, community, environmental histories, and narratives. How has your identities or historical context been flattened, simplified, or erased? How have they been shaped, transformed, and uplifted? How has your relationship to the land affected your current social, political, or environmental circumstances? What tools can we employ as creatives to re-dress the past and rebuild new relationships to self and community? We will watch works by artists of color and read essays by Saidiya Hartman, Alice Walker, and Fred Moten. We will explore how our narratives challenge knowledge production while connecting past to present.nnStudents will identify an archive to use as source material for a personal project. They will use filmmaking and or photography to intervene in or trouble that archive. No experience required. nnThis course is presented by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: burrell, a. (PI)

AFRICAAM 186: Black Experimental Narrative (ARTSTUDI 186)

How do Black video artists and filmmakers use materials, space, and language to construct the subjective space of storytelling? Black Experimental Narrative surveys the aesthetics, history, and theories that characterize experimental Black cinema and video art through a comprehensive range of filmmakers and artists that have contributed work to the canon. As a class project, we will work collectively to design and publish an original publication featuring a selection of work created during the course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Weefur, L. (PI)
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